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» » Indian Life on the Upper Missouri (The Civilization of the American Indian Series)
Indian Life on the Upper Missouri (The Civilization of the American Indian Series) e-book

Author:

John C. Ewers

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Americas

ePub size:

1252 kb

Other formats:

docx mbr doc mobi

Rating:

4.1

Publisher:

University of Oklahoma Press (June 15, 1988)

Pages:

240

ISBN:

0806121416

Indian Life on the Upper Missouri (The Civilization of the American Indian Series) e-book

by John C. Ewers


Denig, who had two Indian wives, and children by them, began trapping for the American Fur Company in 1833, and rose to authority at Fort Union. He didn't leave Indian territory until 1855.

Denig, who had two Indian wives, and children by them, began trapping for the American Fur Company in 1833, and rose to authority at Fort Union. The book has historical value, and it is interesting in its own right, but don't expect detailed histories of the Sioux, Arickaras, Assiniboines, Crees, and Crows.

John Canfield Ewers (July 21, 1909 – May 7, 1997) was an American ethnologist and museum curator. Known for his studies on the art and history of the American Plains Indians, he was described by The New York Times as one of his country's "foremost interpreters of American Indian culture. He was instrumental in establishing the National Museum of American History and became its Director in 1964. At the time of his death he was Ethnologist Emeritus of the Smithsonian Institution.

The Plains Indian of the Upper Missouri in the nineteenth-century buffalo days remains the widely recognized symbol of primitive man par excellence–and the persistent image of the North American Indian at his most romantic.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library .

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. La Raza Historical Society of Santa Clara County Point Loma Nazarene University, Ryan Library Chapman University, Frank Mt. Pleasant Library of Special Collections and Archives Hemet Public Library Center for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide, Sonoma State University Placer County Museums Division California Nursery Company - Roeding.

The Plains Indian of the Upper Missouri in the nineteenth-century buffalo days remains the widely recognized symbol of primitive man par excellence-and the persistent image of the North American Indian at his most romantic.

Are you sure you want to remove Indian Life on the Upper Missouri . by John Canfield Ewers. Published September 1988 by University of Oklahoma Press Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with

Are you sure you want to remove Indian Life on the Upper Missouri (Civilization of the American Indian Series) from your list? Indian Life on the Upper Missouri (Civilization of the American Indian Series). Published September 1988 by University of Oklahoma Press. Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with: WorldCat.

3. The artists seem to have been most interested in the extremes of Indian life.

In a way, these artists were able to debunk various outside prejudices of Northern Plains Indians. 3. Such as the elaborate living structures, the Medicine Man, the twelve year old famous girl, and Ah-jon-jon, the man who was impacted by civilization. The artists were most interested in what they thought was the taboo of Indian life.

PDF American Indians have endured numerous significant historical . more likely to score higher on the Indian Identity Scale than those without ancestor. Testing factor structure.

PDF American Indians have endured numerous significant historical events, including epidemics, warfare, genocide, relocation, and for many,. tices, lived life in an Indian way, and believed maintaining Indian values and prac-. tices was important-both individually and as a family.

The Plains Indian of the Upper Missouri in the nineteenth-century buffalo days remains the widely recognized symbol of primitive man par excellence–and the persistent image of the North American Indian at his most romantic. Fifteen cultural highlights, each a chapter made from research for a particular subject and enriched by contemporary illustrations, provide a sensitive interpretation of tribes such as the Blackfeet, the Crows, and the Mandans from the decades before Lewis and Clark up to the present.

In an attempt to understand and record the old culture of the Indians, the author has developed, over the past 30 years, a special ethnohistorical approach. The results, as seen here, are enlightening both for other ethnohistorians and for historians of more or less conventional bent. This book is abundantly illustrated from historical sources.


Samowar
This book contains 15 articles by well known Plains Indian historian John C. Ewers (1909-1997), all of which are said to be revised from their original publication. Quite a few of the articles revolve around the Blackfeet Indians of present Montana and Southern Alberta (Canada). Topics include: Indian Trade before Lewis and Clark; The Northwest Trade Gun; How George Catlin and Karl Bodmer affected Plains Indian art; The Blackfoot War Lodge; When Sitting Bull Surrendered His Winchester; and how the Plains Indians came to represent all North American Indians, regardless of where they were from geographically. Despite some minor quibbles with the information presented (sorry, I wasn't taking notes), this is a strong selection of articles (the time frame covered is the 1700s and 1800s) and I enjoyed reading them. The articles are short enough that you can read one a day, perfect for commuting or some quiet time after work. You'll even learn some interesting details about Indian Life on the Upper Missouri, too.
Yannara
Indian Life on the Upper Missouri consists of fifteen articles written by John Ewers brings to life the culture of the Native American culture in the Upper Missouri region. He covers everything from remembrances of the days before horses were introduced into the region to the artistic depiction of this culture in the twentieth century. His prose is clear and non-academic, although his subject matter is treated in a very organized and concise manner, similar to academic writing. This book would be useful both for the academic and the casual reader. The use of graphics ties well to the writing and is used to enlighten rather than just to illustrate.

I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in a study of the Indians on the northern reaches of the Great Plains.

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