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» » Canal Fever: The Ohio Erie Canal, from Waterway to Canalway
Canal Fever: The Ohio  Erie Canal, from Waterway to Canalway e-book

Author:

Peg Bobel,Lynn Metzger,Chuck Ayers

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Americas

ePub size:

1424 kb

Other formats:

txt lit doc lrf

Rating:

4.9

Publisher:

The Kent State University Press (September 1, 2009)

Pages:

392

ISBN:

1606350137

Canal Fever: The Ohio Erie Canal, from Waterway to Canalway e-book

by Peg Bobel,Lynn Metzger,Chuck Ayers


Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Canal Fever: The Ohio & Erie Canal, from Waterway to Canalway.

Lynn Metzger, Peg Bobel. Each contributor brings his or her expertise to tell the canal's story in three parts: the canal era - the creation of the canal and its importance to Ohio's early growth; the canal's decline - the decades when the canal was merely a ditch and path in backyards all over northeast Ohio; and finally the rediscovery of this old transportation system and.

Canal Fever takes a broad approach to the canal and what it has meant to Ohio . Natural History Natural Resources and the Ohio Erie Canal. Peg Bobel, a native of Akron, Ohio, worked for over 30 years as a social worker and nonprofit administrator.

Canal Fever takes a broad approach to the canal and what it has meant to Ohio from its original function in the state's growth its present-day function in revitalizing our region. Canal buffs, historians, educators, engineers, and those interested in urban revitalization will appreciate its extensive use of primary source materials and will welcome this comprehensive collection.

Canal Fever takes a broad approach to the canal and what it has meant to Ohio from its original function in the state"s growth its present-­day function in revitalizing our region.

Published by: The Kent State University Press.

Read "Canal Fever The Ohio & Erie Canal, from Waterway to. .

Canal Fever takes a broad approach to the canal and what it has meant to Ohio from its original function in the state’s growth its present-day function in revitalizing our region.

Canal Fever, a play on words referring both to the epidemics of malaria that killed many .

Canal Fever, a play on words referring both to the epidemics of malaria that killed many early canal workers and the recent fervor of preservation, is an excellent work that documents the history of the O&E from its beginnings m the 182Os to the present. What makes this book different from other canal history works is first, its local focus, and second, its continuance of the story beyond the decline of canals as an economically viable form of transportation.

The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System (formerly known as the New York State Barge Canal)

The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System (formerly known as the New York State Barge Canal). Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from the Hudson River in Albany to Lake Erie in Buffalo. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes.

Главный новогодний концерт (3. 2. 2019), Первый канал - Продолжительность: 1:28:52 Новый год - 2020 Recommended for you. 1:28:52. Эта мелодрама с самым высоким рейтингом на ютубе!

Download free electronic books Canal Fever: The Ohio & Erie Canal, from Waterway to Canalway by Lynn Metzger, Peg Bobel Illustrator: Lynn Metzer in Italian iBook.

Download free electronic books Canal Fever: The Ohio & Erie Canal, from Waterway to Canalway by Lynn Metzger, Peg Bobel Illustrator: Lynn Metzer in Italian iBook. Libros que tengo comprados y no he.

Original essays on the past, present, and future of the Ohio & Erie Canal

Combining original essays based on the past, present, and future of the Ohio & Erie Canal, Canal Fever showcases the research and writing of the best and most knowledgeable canal historians, archaeologists, and enthusiasts. Each contributor brings his or her expertise to tell the canal’s story in three parts: the canal era―the creation of the canal and its importance to Ohio’s early growth; the canal’s decline―the decades when the canal was merely a ditch and path in backyards all over northeast Ohio; and finally the rediscovery of this old transportation system and its transformation into a popular recreational resource, the Ohio & Erie Canalway.

Included are many voices from the past, such as canalers, travelers, and immigrants, stories of canal use through various periods, and current interviews with many individuals involved in the recent revitalization of the canal. Accompanying the essays are a varied and interesting selection of photographs of sites, events, and people, as well as original maps and drawings by artist Chuck Ayers.

Canal Fever takes a broad approach to the canal and what it has meant to Ohio from its original function in the state’s growth its present-day function in revitalizing our region. Canal buffs, historians, educators, engineers, and those interested in urban revitalization will appreciate its extensive use of primary source materials and will welcome this comprehensive collection.


Bladecliff
great material on the eastern portion of the Ohio canal system, from inception to closing. Vewry descriptive and interesting about the link joining Lake Erie with the Muskingum and Ohio Rivers and the link to PA
Faebei
I really liked the book. It was very informative. There could have been a few more pictures, though. I would recommend the book to anyone interested in Ohio's canal system.
Ustamya
We today think little or nothing about flying across the country to visit family, or driving on a several thousand mile vacation, or shipping a package across the state, the country or the world. This takes energy, low cost energy. While we really know, we forget that for most of history such energy simply wasn’t available. Any energy you could get was from a waterwheel, a sail on a boat, or mostly muscle power.

The Ohio and Erie canal was built by men with picks and shovels and horses and mules. It was begun in 1825 and took seven years to build at a cost of $4,300,000. With gold worth $20 an ounce at that time, that is 215,000 ounces of gold, which today costs about $1200 per ounce or $258,000,000.

It almost seems like producing this book was a task of almost the same effort. Lynn Metzer and Peg Bobel are extremely active in the association that is restoring the canal for use as a cultural/historical landmark. They have prevailed on some sixteen experts to write articles on some aspect of the history of building and use of the canal, the times after the railroad more or less ended its functionality, and the recent restoration and preservation efforts. They have done a marvelous job.

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