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» » The October Crisis, 1970: An Insider's View
The October Crisis, 1970: An Insider's View e-book

Author:

William Tetley

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Americas

ePub size:

1716 kb

Other formats:

mbr doc lit lrf

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

McGill-Queen's University Press; Reprint edition (October 26, 2006)

Pages:

310

ISBN:

0773531181

The October Crisis, 1970: An Insider's View e-book

by William Tetley


William Tetley attended the Royal Canadian Naval College and served with the Royal Canadian Navy. In December 2006, his book The October Crisis, 1970: An Insider's View was published by McGill-Queen's University Press

William Tetley attended the Royal Canadian Naval College and served with the Royal Canadian Navy. He graduated from McGill University with a Bachelor's degree then obtained a law degree from Université Laval. He was admitted to the Bar of Quebec in 1952, a year he also began contributing to the Montreal Star and the Montreal Gazette newspapers as a literary critic. In December 2006, his book The October Crisis, 1970: An Insider's View was published by McGill-Queen's University Press. An art collector, William Tetley was a member of the Board of Directors of the McCord Museum of Canadian History.

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October Crisis, 1970: An Insider’s View. The truth is much different. The October Crisis was not merely a series of events that took place from October to December 1970.

In a detailed analysis of the government's decision-making process, Tetley points out what most historical interpretations ignore: all but sixty of those apprehended were soon released, not a window was broken, and the calm that descended on Quebec and Canada has lasted for thirty-six years. -Résumé de l'éditeur.

In October 1970, Robert Bourassa's provincial government refused to exchange political hostages for twenty-three FLQ terrorists. By the evening of 15 October, 3,000 outraged Quebecers appeared poised to riot. Fearing insurrection, the federal government implemented the War Measures Act and jailed 497 people.

Tetley addresses important questions, corrects widely believed factual . Books related to October Crisis, 1970: An Insider’s View.

Tetley addresses important questions, corrects widely believed factual errors, and successfully deconstructs events fr. .

Article excerpt Nonetheless, Tetley's book is important for two reasons: it i.

William Tetley, The October Crisis, 1970: An Insider's View (Kingston & Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2006), xxxviii + 274pp. 25. ISBN 9780- 7735-3118-5. Terrorists, journalists, soldiers, politicians, academics, activists and even a prime minister have offered their own 'authoritative' histories. Nonetheless, Tetley's book is important for two reasons: it is written in English and it defends the government's actions. William Tetley, now professor of international law, McGill University, was serving as a minister in Robert Bourassa s cabinet when the October Crisis broke out. మరింత చదవండి.

Book Publishing WeChat. The October Crisis, 1970: An Insider’s View. Montréal: McGill-Queen’s University Press. The notion that Machiavelli’s insights in the sixteenth century might have utility for a critique of 20th century Quebecois political life seemed outrageous and we wanted to explore the validity of such associations. There’s nothing wrong with this.

In December 2006, his book The October Crisis, 1970: An Insider's View was published by McGill-Queen's .

In December 2006, his book The October Crisis, 1970: An Insider's View was published by McGill-Queen's University Press. Rosslyn Tetley, William Tetley's lifelong companion, died on January 14, 2016, at the age of 81.

In October 1970, Robert Bourassa's provincial government refused to exchange political hostages for twenty-three FLQ terrorists. By the evening of 15 October, 3,000 outraged Quebecers appeared poised to riot. Fearing insurrection, the federal government implemented the War Measures Act and jailed 497 people. Most Canadian historians cite this event as an unjustified assault on civil rights and political liberty - The October Crisis, 1970 challenges this assumption. William Tetley, then a minister in Bourassa's cabinet, breaks the government's silence about the event and, with meticulous reference to now available documentation and passages from his own 1970 diary, reveals details of the government's decision-making process. He also points out facts that most historical interpretations gloss over: for instance, all but sixty of those apprehended were soon released, not a window was broken, and the calm that descended on Quebec and Canada has lasted for four decades.
Unh
...even in the foreword of THE OCTOBER CRISIS, 1970: AN INSIDER'S VIEW, William Tetley is blunt about the biggest hurdle to jump in tackling the subject: "This is either novel nor narrative. I have tried to keep to the facts, while my opinion usually appears at the end of each...chapter."
To admit so bravely that it is hard for a Canadian or Quebecois author to approach the subject from a completely academic point of view, and thus admit to an attempt to control, rather than eject, their emotions is the first moment in the book where one can see that this will be different.

Tetley's book is highly readable, covering the crisis with a concentration on the players inside Quebec. While it gives a great overview of the Federal government and it's proactions and reactions to it, the undoubtedly center players here are Rene Levesque, the Bloc leadership, and the individual members of the FLQ.
For Tetley, these are not merely dry historical figures to be moved around like chesspieces: he tries to get inside their heads and make their actions understandable to the reader while avoiding anything approaching moral judgement. It's a tightrope, and Tetley walks it very well.

As he states in his foreword, the book is overflowing with citations and quotes from source material, to the point where some researchers on this subject might find the bibliography the most fascinating part of the book. He understands this, and the back 1/5 of the pages almost seem as if they could be a book in themselves.

This is an amazing trove of source material, and a very empathetic view of the events of 1970. For scholarly readers, this is worth it's price just for the bibliography alone, and the smooth writing style is accessible to people who are looking for a book to start out their education on the subject.
Jube
Not what I hoped it would be. But it did give facts I had forgotten
Nalmezar
I lived through this era. And I have read this book before. A thorough, well-reasoned examination of the era in Quebec native-grown terrorism.

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