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» » Ch'orti'-Maya Survival in Eastern Guatemala: Indigeneity in Transition
Ch'orti'-Maya Survival in Eastern Guatemala: Indigeneity in Transition e-book

Author:

Brent E. Metz

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Americas

ePub size:

1515 kb

Other formats:

doc txt docx lrf

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

University of New Mexico Press; 44784th edition (May 1, 2006)

Pages:

356

ISBN:

0826338801

Ch'orti'-Maya Survival in Eastern Guatemala: Indigeneity in Transition e-book

by Brent E. Metz


Scholars and Guatemalans have characterized eastern Guatemala as Ladino or non-Indian. The Ch'orti' do not exhibit the obvious indigenous markers found among the Mayas of western Guatemala.

Scholars and Guatemalans have characterized eastern Guatemala as Ladino or non-Indian.

Ethnic issues in Guatemala are commonly analyzed using theoretical frameworks that underscore the role of Maya activism in promoting Mayan identification. However, these frameworks often pay insufficient attention to the local significance of phenotype. In this study, I propose an alternative framework to explain ethno-racial status in contexts of mestizaje. Based on this framework, I investigate.

Published: 1 April 2008. Keywords: Ch'orti, Maya Survival, indigeneity, Eastern Guatemala, Transition Brent, Metz.

Scholars and Guatemalans have characterized eastern Guatemala as "Ladino" or non-­Indian. The Ch'orti' do not exhibit the obvious indigenous markers found among the Mayas of western Guatemala, Chiapas, and the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico

Scholars and Guatemalans have characterized eastern Guatemala as "Ladino" or non-­Indian. The Ch'orti' do not exhibit the obvious indigenous markers found among the Mayas of western Guatemala, Chiapas, and the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico. Few still speak Ch'orti', most no longer wear distinctive dress, and most community organizations have long been abandoned. During the colonial period, the Ch'orti' region was adjacent to relatively vibrant economic regions of Central America that included major trade routes, mines, and dye plantations.

The Ch'orti' do not exhibit the obvious indigenous markers found among the Mayas of western Guatemala, Chiapas .

The Ch'orti' do not exhibit the obvious indigenous markers found among the Mayas of western Guatemala, Chiapas, and the Yucat�n Peninsula of Mexico. He found Ch'orti's to be ashamed of their indigeneity, and he was fortunate to be present and involved when many Ch'orti's joined the Maya Movement.

Book Overview The Ch'orti' do not exhibit the obvious indigenous markers found among the Mayas of western Guatemala, Chiapas, and th. . The Ch'orti' do not exhibit the obvious indigenous markers found among the Mayas of western Guatemala, Chiapas, and the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.

Ch'orti'-Maya Survival in Eastern Guatemala: Indigeneity in Transition.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Geographic Name: Guatemala Social life and customs. Rubrics: Chorti Indians History Social conditions Politics and government.

Ch’orti’-Maya survival in eastern Guatemala: Indigeneity in transition. Gender, migration, and transnational identities: Maya and ladino relations in eastern Guatemala. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press. Dissertation), University of Florida. Rosenbaum, B. (1993).

Scholars and Guatemalans have characterized eastern Guatemala as "Ladino" or non-Indian. The Ch'orti' do not exhibit the obvious indigenous markers found among the Mayas of western Guatemala, Chiapas, and the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico. Few still speak Ch'orti', most no longer wear distinctive dress, and most community organizations have long been abandoned.

During the colonial period, the Ch'orti' region was adjacent to relatively vibrant economic regions of Central America that included major trade routes, mines, and dye plantations. In the twentieth century Ch'orti's directly experienced U.S.-backed dictatorships, a 36-year civil war from start to finish, and Christian evangelization campaigns, all while their population has increased exponentially. These have had tremendous impacts on Ch'orti' identities and cultures.

From 1991 to 1993, Brent Metz lived in three Ch'orti' Maya-speaking communities, learning the language, conducting household surveys, and interviewing informants. He found Ch'orti's to be ashamed of their indigeneity, and he was fortunate to be present and involved when many Ch'orti's joined the Maya Movement. He has continued to expand his ethnographic research of the Ch'orti' annually ever since and has witnessed how Ch'orti's are reformulating their history and identity.


Qumenalu
The book is quite technical, but unlike tourism guides, this text deals with the people and the culture. This is why international travel is interesting and rewarding. True, the book deals with the native peoples, but in doing so, also reveals the western encroachment, and interactions with other populations within Guatemala. It's worth readiing.
Bukelv
Perfect.

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