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» » New York Burning: Liberty, Slavery, and Conspiracy in Eighteenth-Century Manhattan
New York Burning: Liberty, Slavery, and Conspiracy in Eighteenth-Century Manhattan e-book

Author:

Jill Lepore

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Americas

ePub size:

1565 kb

Other formats:

mbr doc azw lit

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Highbridge Audio; Abridged edition (September 8, 2005)

ISBN:

1565119681

New York Burning: Liberty, Slavery, and Conspiracy in Eighteenth-Century Manhattan e-book

by Jill Lepore


Professor Lapore's "New York Burning" will disturb many readers. American slavery and the attendant slave revolts were not all initiated in the South as this documentary illustrates

Professor Lapore's "New York Burning" will disturb many readers. Still, this in an incredibly important book for anyone interested in the history of our nation and/or the all-too-tragic fragility of race relations in America. For this, Professor Lapore deserves our appreciation. American slavery and the attendant slave revolts were not all initiated in the South as this documentary illustrates. New York City Burning" is a good read, not only on the NYC slave revolt that took place, but takes the reader to 18th century Manhattan.

In New York Burning, Bancroft Prize-winning historian Jill Lepore recounts these dramatic events of 1741, when ten fires blazed across Manhattan and panicked whites suspecting it to be the work a slave uprising went on a rampage

In New York Burning, Bancroft Prize-winning historian Jill Lepore recounts these dramatic events of 1741, when ten fires blazed across Manhattan and panicked whites suspecting it to be the work a slave uprising went on a rampage. In the end, thirteen black men were burned at the stake, seventeen were hanged and more than one hundred black men and women were thrown into a dungeon beneath City Hall. Even back in the seventeenth century, the city was a rich mosaic of cultures, communities and colors, with slaves making up a full one-fifth of the population.

New York Burning book. Even then, the city was a rich mosaic of cultures, communities and colors, with slaves making up a full one-fifth of the population.

Аудиокнига "New York Burning: Liberty, Slavery, and Conspiracy in Eighteenth-Century Manhattan", Jill Lepore. Читает Beth McDonald. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы

Аудиокнига "New York Burning: Liberty, Slavery, and Conspiracy in Eighteenth-Century Manhattan", Jill Lepore. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Vivid and provocative; evokes eighteenth-century New York in all its moral and physical messiness. sober, meticulous, balanced book" -The Washington Post Book World. The type of book that we need to read and historians need to write, more often. brings this terrifying period vividly to life.

Listen to unlimited audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The untold story of the little-known Manhattan slave rebellion of 1741 and the white hysteria that resulted in thirty black men hanged or burned at the stake, over a hundred black men and women thrown into the dungeon beneath City Hall, and many more shipped into bone-crushing slavery on Caribbean plantations.

subscription required).

Though, as Jill Lepore writes, New York's slave past ha. .A gripping tale and groundbreaking investigation of a mysterious, and largely forgotten, eighteenth-century slave plot to destroy New York City. Over a few weeks in 1741, ten fires blazed across Manhattan. With each new fire, panicked whites saw more evidence of a slave uprising.

Boston, MA, and New York, NY: Bedford/St. 193 pp. ISBN: 0-312-40216-3 (pb. Volume 30 Issue 2 - Marjoleine Kars.

The untold story of the little-known Manhattan slave rebellion of 1741 and the white hysteria that resulted in thirty black men hanged or burned at the stake, over a hundred black men and women thrown into the dungeon beneath City Hall, and many more shipped into bone-crushing slavery on Caribbean plantations. Was this a brutal and audacious rebellion prevented just in time or a far more horrible and unjust version of the Salem witch trials?
Tat
This is a great piece of historiography about something few know about at all --- slavery in New York City in the 18th century. How about a slave "rebellion" in New York City, how about more people burned at the stake than in the Salem witchcraft trials, how about dark byways and highways of old New York, barely transformed from its days as New Amsterdam, dark plots in dank places, shrill frightened tyrants overreacting with bloody retribution, burned ruins of an early African American village in Central Park?
One cannot make up this stuff, it is too real so it must be history at its best.
And written by one of our premier authors of history, a woman who makes our history live in The New Yorker to the acclaim of many, and yet whose best book, this one, is still too little known.
If you appreciate Harry Truman's remark that the only new thing under the Sun is the history you haven't read, then this is one to curl up with and marvel at; a great way to spend a rainy day or a dark night.
Zinnthi
I doubt anyone who does not want to read a true historical book with a lot of facts but not as exciting as a non-fiction novel will enjoy this. I liked it because I learned a lot of things about New York that I was really surprised to read. Seems my beloved New York had a pretty bloody, violent history towards slaves and Catholics and some others the leaders and people did not like. I didn't realize the punishments of the day were just as bad, if not worse, than those of the Salem Witch hunt days. Beware, some of the content may turn your stomach.
Snowseeker
All history books should be this detailed, this readable, this humane. Lepore knows how to write about a horrible, nearly forgotten episode in NYC history. Unlike many historians, she steps away from overt politics or raw emotion. She knows that this subject is too serious to be shouted. It is the rare history book that is packed with facts as well as knowledge.

I felt like Lepore was taking my hand and leading me through the smelly streets of lower Manhattan in 1741, like I could almost see the faces of...what were they, anyway? The victims of a horrible hoax? The demented planners of a plot to burn the city? Or something in between, where thieves can also be the keepers of ancient rites from a distant homeland, where the world is turned upside down?

I could go on and on, but just buy the book!
Quinthy
This book makes you think differently about new york city. Great college read.
MrCat
Jill Lepore's "New York Burning: Liberty, Slavery, and Conspiracy in Eighteenth-Century Manhattan" is a valuable and admirable examination of one of the darkest episodes in New York's history: the so-called slave rebellion of 1741 and the brutal vengeance that was extracted. Professor Lepore's painstaking research confronts the reader with a terrible conclusion: even the most respectable of people in society will consent to the deaths of human beings, based on even the tiniest shreds of evidence.

Focusing primarily on the actions of Daniel Horsmanden, the City's Recorder, Lepore provides the reader with a background on the attitudes of New York's whites toward their slaves. She makes clear that Gotham was neither the first nor only city to have witnessed slave uprisings. (It had suffered a similar uprising a couple of decades earlier.) But the events of 1741 were unique for several reasons:

--the shifting finger-pointing at various groups;

--the inconsistency of Mary Burton's testimony, which essentially was the case against several slaves;and

--Horsmanden's bizarre behavior toward Mary Burton.

Admittedly, I've only superficially studied this dark time in New York's history, so I was shocked to learn that there were actually several "conspiracies": the Negro Plot, Hughson's Plot, the Spanish Plot, the Roman Plot, etc. Each plot was hatched depending on who confessed to what. Worst of all, the white population of New York--fueled by racism, xenophobia, paranoia, and, not the least of all, bloodlust--went right along with it. And, with the exception of an intriguing anonymous letter from Massachussetts, it seems the rest of the colonies went along with it, too. While Horsmanden is just short of villified in this book, he is not alone in his culpability.

Professor Lapore's "New York Burning" will disturb many readers. The accounts of the slaves and the few whites burning, hanging, begging, and praying are graphic and heartbreaking. Still, this in an incredibly important book for anyone interested in the history of our nation and/or the all-too-tragic fragility of race relations in America. For this, Professor Lapore deserves our appreciation
Ballazan
.
This is an important book that explores in depth what is usually only found in textbooks as a one-sentence summation:
"In 1741 there was a slave uprising in New York City."

Scholars will probably be happier starting with the Appendix and bibliography and then reading the book. The text is disorganized and uneven, and although this is non-fiction, the characters could have been more finely drawn. Peter Zenger's trail keeps popping up in unexpected places, often disconnected from the action the author is working on. Some sections are heavy on primary documents and period writings, others are more poetic.

Yes, I do understand the parallels with the Salem Witch Trials. The Salem Witch Trials get more press today because of Arthur Miller's "Crucible." Color and religion of the participants aside, both events are stories of group think and mass hysteria, fear and anger. There is plenty of room here for a first-class film or play to be written.

Read this book, learn from it. Expect to complain about it.

Kim Burdick
Stanton, DE
DrayLOVE
American slavery and the attendant slave revolts were not all initiated in the South as this documentary illustrates. "New York City Burning" is a good read, not only on the NYC slave revolt that took place, but takes the reader to 18th century Manhattan.
Eye opener

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