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» » Mau Mau: An African Crucible
Mau Mau: An African Crucible e-book

Author:

Robert B. Edgerton

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Africa

ePub size:

1973 kb

Other formats:

lrf lrf rtf mbr

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Ballantine Books (January 30, 1991)

Pages:

304

ISBN:

0345369785

Mau Mau: An African Crucible e-book

by Robert B. Edgerton


Edgerton's overview of the Mau Mau uprising, the State of Emergency, and the subsequent birth of independent Kenya remains one of the better reconstructions of its time and place

Edgerton's overview of the Mau Mau uprising, the State of Emergency, and the subsequent birth of independent Kenya remains one of the better reconstructions of its time and place. The intersection of the anti-colonial movement with the cold war provided the spectacle of an outpost of the "Free World", defending itself by scorched earth and barb-wire concentration camps disguised as "resettlement" (as in South Vietnam).

Edgerton, Robert . 1931-. Mau Mau, Nationalism. New York : Free Press ; London : Collier Macmillan. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on September 9, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

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The struggle for Mau Mau rehabilitation in late colonial Kenya. International Journal of African Historical Studies 33 (2000): 25-57. Looking beyond Mau Mau: archiving violence in the era of decolonization. Looking beyond Mau Mau: archiving violence in the era of decolonization Engholm, Geoffrey. Afr ican elections in Kenya, March 1957. I n William MacKenzie and Kenneth Robinson (eds), Five Elections in Africa: A Group of Electoral Studies, 391-461 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960).

Home Edgerton, Robert B. Mau Mau: An African Crucible. ISBN 10: 0029089204, ISBN 13: 9780029089200. Edgerton concludes that the primary cause of Mau Mau was the actions of the white settler community and that the excesses of the settlers went far beyond those of the Mau Mau. Not to be read for Kenyan history, as some major factors are barely mentioned and shallowly treated, this will be appreciated by individuals interested in insurrections growing out of inequality and injustice, whether in Africa or elsewhere. For informed laypersons and general readers.

Mau Mau. An African Crucible. by Robert B. Edgerton. Published January 30, 1991 by Ballantine Books. 20th century, Mau Mau Emergency, 1952-1960.

Mau Mau: An African Crucible. New York: Free Press, 1989. This Pulitzer Prize–winning book is focused on the British detention and rehabilitation camp system. E-mail Citation . A somewhat sensationalist narrative whose writing style and occasional errors are balanced by a number of original insights into Mau Mau. Elkins, Caroline. Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya. New York: Henry Holt, 2005. Its narrative is built in part from the testimony of over three hundred interviews with Gikuyu detainees, as well as former British settlers and officials. Mau Mau and Kenya: An Analysis of a Peasant Revolt.

Mau Mau: An African Crucible. The Individual in Cultural Adaptation. Am hist rev. Dane Kennedy. Like Lions They Fought: The Zulu War and the Last Black Empire in South Africa.

The Mau Mau Uprising (1952–1960), also known as the Mau Mau Rebellion, the Kenya Emergency, and the Mau Mau Revolt, was a war in the British Kenya Colony (1920–1963) between the Kenya Land and Freedom Army (KLFA), also known as Mau Mau, and the Briti.

The Mau Mau Uprising (1952–1960), also known as the Mau Mau Rebellion, the Kenya Emergency, and the Mau Mau Revolt, was a war in the British Kenya Colony (1920–1963) between the Kenya Land and Freedom Army (KLFA), also known as Mau Mau, and the British colonists.

The Mau Mau rebellion in the 1950s was portrayed as the work of a primitive cult who exercised violence against white settlers in Kenya. Edgerton shows that in reality the Mau Mau were a national liberation army like many others that rose up against the British in the twilight of Empire. 8-page photo insert.
Ginaun
book has water damage. not as described.
no repeat biusiness here
Musical Aura Island
Edgerton's overview of the Mau Mau uprising, the State of Emergency, and the subsequent birth of independent Kenya remains one of the better reconstructions of its time and place. The intersection of the anti-colonial movement with the cold war provided the spectacle of an outpost of the "Free World", defending itself by scorched earth and barb-wire concentration camps disguised as "resettlement" (as in South Vietnam). It also produced the paradox of white liberals and progressives supporting a black Ku-Klux, whose atrocities literally cut its own throat in the struggle for legitimacy in Kenya Uhuru.

There's much speculation on the origin of the mysterious nickname. One suspects it was adopted by young rebels as an Africanized version of "Mao", to underscore the revolutionary peasant aspirations of the movement. Both sides of the struggle were losers in the end. The priviliged settlers lived as a self-styled Herrenvolk whose chief pastime was a parody of Marx' "community of women." Despite Jomo Kenyatta's call for Harambee - all working together - the settlers knew that it was the end of their mastery, the very thing that had made Kenya so compelling in the first place. No guarantees, however sincere, could restrain their desertion.

As for the black majority, ironically the poor peasant tribesmen who were the backbone of Mau Mau did not taste the fruits of struggle. They instead watched from the sidelines as colonial collaborators and educated, urban "moderates" took over the white villas (and white mischief) and put the country's treasures in their own pockets. Bwanas (white sirs) were replaced by Benzis (Mercedes owners) and the memory of Mau Mau was to be as buried as even Winston Churchill could hope. Also revealing is that Jomo Kenyatta's independent Kenya was to serve as role model for Nelson Mandela's post-apartheid South Africa: unity through stalemate, development through stagnation.

And Kenyatta himself? Demonized by white settlers as the evil genius of Mau Mau, his defenders maintained he knew "absolutely nothing" about it. Canny observers will gather that the truth lay between: formally distancing himself from the bloody doings of the Kenya African Union's militant youth wing, he used its terrorism for advantage to himself and his movement, placing himself as the responsible moderate who could save white skins and black dignity. Once in power he disavowed all relationship with his "native army" and concentrated on national development: most notably his own monarchy. Remaining whites doubtless looked on the pinata of independence as cynical confirmation of their opinion on what "Maw Maw was really all about."
Froststalker
Amazing details throughout.

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