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» » With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child, Vol. 3
With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child, Vol. 3 e-book

Author:

Keiko Tobe

Language:

English

Category:

Fitness

Subcategory:

Psychology & Counseling

ePub size:

1697 kb

Other formats:

mbr lrf rtf docx

Rating:

4.6

Publisher:

Yen Press (September 30, 2008)

Pages:

528

ISBN:

0759523843

With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child, Vol. 3 e-book

by Keiko Tobe


Book 3 of 8 in the With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child Series. Keiko Tobe has unified people from all over the world with this stellar series. She wisely included explanations and descriptions of Japanese culture and mores as well as some humor.

Book 3 of 8 in the With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child Series. I like the way she talks about people who have influenced this book. While Tobe does not go into great detail about autism, her story and the magnificent drawings clearly depict severely autistic behavior and how it impacts others. This is a delightful book that will remain a bright light in the hearts of all who read it.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child (With the Light, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

PDF On Oct 1, 2009, Ernst O. VanBergeijk and others published Keiko Kobe, With the Light: Raising an. .already fascinated by the Japanese culture and the world of. manga. With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child is a useful. tool for clinicians who want to provide families with a book

PDF On Oct 1, 2009, Ernst O. VanBergeijk and others published Keiko Kobe, With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child. tool for clinicians who want to provide families with a book. on autism that is realistic and sensitively portrayed. It may. be particularly helpful to give to the older siblings of a child. However, some readers may object to the use of.

With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child is a josei drama manga by Keiko Tobe. It began serialization in 2000 in For Mr. and serial chapters were collected in 15 tankōbon volumes by Akita Shoten. The series depicts the struggles of a young mother, Sachiko Azuma, raising her autistic son Hikaru in modern Japan. The series is licensed in English in North America by Yen Press, with eight volumes (each collecting two tankōbon volumes with the exception of the final volume) published as of September 2011.

Keiko Tobe was born in Amagasaki in Hyougo, Japan. She graduated from Kwansei Gakuin University's School of Economics and took an advertising job thereafter. Tobe-sensei lives in Japan with her husband and two sons. When her then-newlywed existence required her to move to Tokyo with her husband, she began working as a mangaka's assistant and eventually became a mangaka herself is universally considered her masterwork.

With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child

With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child. With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child Vol. 3. 3 - Manga. A little effort goes a long way-that's what Sachiko, Honda-san, and Gunji-sensei learn as they struggle to work together to make life easier for the Special Education children. With the help of gadgets and the support of more people in their environment than meets the eye, Hikaru and Miyu become able to communicate better with the world around them.

McCloud (1993) in his seminal book, Understanding Comics, provides us with clues as to why Japanese manga graphic novels, such as With the Light,are so popular among higher functioning individuals on the autism spectrum. He refers to comics as sequential art that ‘strips down an image to its essential meaning and can amplify that meaning in a way that realistic art can’t’ (p. 30). McCloud feels that comics are visual iconography which approaches a form of universal communication. Comics are ‘a mono-sensory medium, which relies on only one sense to convey a world of experience’ (p. 89).

Vol. 3 : Raising an Autistic Child. By (author) Keiko Tobe.

by Mariko Abe. My Son Is A Senior In College by Masako Suzuki. Alexis Eckerman letterer. Keiko Tobe artist, cover, writer. Header 4. Header 3. Header 2. Quote. Satsuki Yamashita other.

A little effort goes a long way-that's what Sachiko, Honda-san, and Gunji-sensei learn as they struggle to work together to make life easier for the Special Education children. With the help of gadgets and the support of more people in their environment than meets the eye, Hikaru and Miyu become able to communicate better with the world around them. But when Hikaru's teen idol classmate sends some mothers into a flashbulb frenzy that causes Hikaru to panic, other parents begin to question his presence alongside "normal" students in the classroom. Hikaru's first school trip also ends in disaster, when he gets separated from the group, and Sachiko begins to worry that Hikaru is losing his hard-fought place in society.
mIni-Like
As I mentioned in my reviews for Volumes 1 and 2 of this series, this beautifully done manga effort provides so much insight into raising a child with autism for those unfamiliar with the disorder that I cannot rate it less than five stars. Japanese manga artist Keiko Tobe was inspired to create this series after meeting a child with autism, a male kindergarten classmate of her younger son, as well as the boy's mother, who wanted him to be a "cheerful working adult". Serialization of this story began in 2000 in a Josei drama manga magazine called "For Mrs." that provides stories aimed at housewives about everyday experiences of women living in Japan. Entries were later collected into volumes, and this volume is the second of an eventual 8-volume English translation. Some readers might be interested in knowing that in 2004 it was also adapted as a Japanese television drama that won several awards, including "Best Drama" at Japan's 41st Television Drama Academy Awards.

The third volume in this series about a family whose son Hikaru is autistic follows Hikaru through an additional 12 episodes that cover his later elementary years. While I mentioned in my review of the second volume that I found it a bit slower than the first, this third volume brings back the increased pace of the first volume. The way Keiko Tobe carried over the optimism of the protagonist's supportive special education teacher, with his refrains "autism isn't your fault" and "each child has the ability to grow", is especially well done, especially in light of the way Hikaru's mother Sachiko shares her thoughts on how "those words saved me from a dark place". Be prepared for a lot of subplots as you read this entry in the series, including a host of new topics that enter the plot as Hikaru gets older, such as mainstreaming and school choice alongside the continued dialogue of a misinformed public. And as the father of a son diagnosed with autism, I especially enjoyed the reentry of Hikaru's father Azuma to the plot late into this volume.

Although developments in autism research have increased significantly in the last several years, and there is residual misinformation from previous decades in this story, especially in the "What is Autism" essay at the back of this volume, I continue to spread the word about this series and am looking forward to reading subsequent volumes. As with the first two volumes, a few short essays and translation notes are shared in the closing pages, but I want to call out the 4-page essay by attorney Mariko Abe, who shares very personal thoughts on her life with son Pon-suke, which will likely speak to many parents of autistic children. "A parent does not know how long she can live with her child. But if I can be with Pon-suke when that goal is achieved, I would like to tell him, 'I gave birth to you in a place with the most beautiful view of Morioka City. You can lead a happy life. I'm very glad I had you.' And I would like him to relish his happiness even after I'm gone...hopefully in an environment surrounded by his supporters and loved ones." Beautifully done.
Folsa
This stellar series makes me think of the 1968 George Harrison song, "The Inner Light" and the spiritual "This Little Light of Mine (I'm Gonna Let it Shine)." This book might make you cry. This is the third book in a series about Hikaru Azuma, a child with autism.

Since this book was written in the Japanese manga style, readers are also treated to Japanese literary culture. The book's story sequence is from right to left, which is the opposite of most Western languages. A glossary of Japanese words and a list of Japanese holidays and description of services for people with autism are provided as well. Readers are engaging in a form of cultural sharing with this book.

Sachiko and Masato Azuma's first child, Hikaru has severe autism. Hikaru is a linking of cultures as well. Masato's mother is Western and his late father was plainly Japanese. Sachiko is Western. Hikaru is more Asian in appearance than his sister, Kanon. There are other non-Asian and even Eurasian characters which provide a "diverse" look at Japan and Japanese culture.

Readers are treated to aspects of Japanese culture. Holidays and popular movies and shows are listed. Readers get a good, clear picture of Japanese culture and services. The book also includes useful websites about autism and can also be seen as a good resource tool.

In this third installment, Hikaru, now 10 and in 5th grade is coping with a poorly matched teacher, Gunji-san. Miyu, his younger classmate has a much more severe form of autism. Luckily, Hikaru's old friends from day care, Nobuaki and Moe as well as a new peer mentor, Yoshida are there for him. Moe-chan, ever Hikaru's protector remains a loyal friend as does the high spirited, rough and tumble fun loving Nobuaki as well as their fair-minded, logical friend, Tanaka-kun. He is the only one of the three who has known Hikaru since they were infants. Moe and Nobuaki were Hikaru's day care classmates.

Tanaka-kun has become a local celebrity. Luckily, his teacher insists that the parents not photograph the boy in his classroom; he said that Tanaka was his student first. Sadly, the bright flashbulbs set Hikaru off and the parents fear that he might not be well suited for his part-time inclusion in a 5th grade class.

Hikaru, like many with autism has language processing issues. He does not respond when another child greets him; noises upset him and he responds to his world largely on a sensory level. Bright and determined, he remains fixed and focused on whatever he is currently involved in. Rigid thinking patterns are often a part of autism.

The illustrations are nothing short of phenomenal and the character development vivid brilliant. Kanon, Hikaru's toddler sister is by now enrolled in day care and has the same outstanding teacher Hikaru, Moe and the others had just a few years earlier. Bright and high spirited, she continues giving her brother crash courses in interaction.

Old friends are reunited. In one especially moving part of the story, Nobuaki said he wished Hikaru could stay in his [Nobuaki's] class forever. It is Nobuaki and Moe who have helped Hikaru the most with peer interaction. They were beautiful examples of tolerance.

The students are reunited with Aoki-sensei, Hikaru and Miyu's extraordinary teacher. He has been transferred to another school and his former pupils meet again on a class overnight trip. The kind volunteer who, in Volume 2 who had lost her son with autism joined forces with other volunteers and set up a respite center. Hikaru travels with an aide who supervises him and lets him escape when the noise level is too much. Nobuaki, a fun-loving boisterous and large personality even apologizes when his loud, perfectly appropriate splashing play was upsetting to Hikaru. I like the way these kids took Hikaru under their wing and learned to view him with compassion and tolerance. That is what keeps the light shining.

At times, one could easily forget that this is a novel. Serious topics such street brawls, drunkenness, developing sexuality and sexual awareness are realistically and sensitively included in this third installment. This book has a preface by a parent in Japan who has a child with autism. It is very interesting to learn about autism services in other countries. The Japanese character for "autism" is "closed off" or "cloistered self." The irony of the Japanese character for autism is that Hikaru is part of a very integrated community and, thanks to Moe, Nobuaki and others is anything but cloistered.

Keiko Tobe has unified people from all over the world with this stellar series. She wisely included explanations and descriptions of Japanese culture and mores as well as some humor. I like the way she talks about people who have influenced this book. While Tobe does not go into great detail about autism, her story and the magnificent drawings clearly depict severely autistic behavior and how it impacts others.

This is a delightful book that will remain a bright light in the hearts of all who read it. I was delighted to learn that this will be a continuing series! I'm already looking forward to the next installment!
Yalone
These books give an unusual insight to the life of parenting a child on the "spectrum". A great read for parents, teachers and teenagers.
Keth
Great book and prompt delivery.
Prince Persie
The "With the Light" manga series is excellent. It presents autism is a completely new format. Even though the series is set in Japan, the experiences that parents of autistic children go through are universal. Some parts of this book made me cry.
Marilace
Great book.

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