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» » Dying for a Hamburger: Modern Meat Processing and the Epidemic of Alzheimer's Disease
Dying for a Hamburger: Modern Meat Processing and the Epidemic of Alzheimer's Disease e-book

Author:

MD Murray Waldman,Marjorie Lamb

Language:

English

Category:

Fitness

Subcategory:

Diseases & Physical Ailments

ePub size:

1213 kb

Other formats:

lit lrf doc mbr

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Thomas Dunne Books; 1st edition (July 1, 2005)

Pages:

320

ISBN:

031234015X

Dying for a Hamburger: Modern Meat Processing and the Epidemic of Alzheimer's Disease e-book

by MD Murray Waldman,Marjorie Lamb


Dying for a Hamburger book.

Dying for a Hamburger book. The statistical rise of AD and its meteoric rise in risk as one gets older present a compelling case. It's truly a horrible, horrible disease and certainly gave me a greater understanding for those whose family members suffer from i. .

InDying for a Hamburger, Dr. Murray Waldman, in collaboration with writer Marjorie Lamb, sets out to show that Alzheimer’s is, indeed, a deadly modern plague

InDying for a Hamburger, Dr. Murray Waldman, in collaboration with writer Marjorie Lamb, sets out to show that Alzheimer’s is, indeed, a deadly modern plague. They present startling evidence that Alzheimer’s is one of a family of diseases caused by a malformed protein – or prion – that also causes mad cow disease and its human variant, Cruetzfeld-Jakob disease (CJD). Bubonic plague, Black Death, AID. nd Alzheimer’s? One in ten people over 65, and nearly half of those over 85, have Alzheimer’s disease. Today, we simply accept the idea that old people lose their minds as a matter of course.

book by Marjorie Lamb. One in ten people older than sixty-five, and nearly half of those older than eighty-five, have Alzheimer's disease. by Marjorie Lamb and Murray Waldman.

pdf, Download Murray Waldman epub Read Dying for a Hamburger: Modern Meat .

pdf, Download Murray Waldman epub Read Dying for a Hamburger: Modern Meat Processing and the Epidemic of Alzheimer s Disease Online, Download pdf Murray Waldman Read Dying for a Hamburger: Modern Meat Processing and the Epidemic of Alzheimer s Disease Online, Read Murray Waldman ebook Read Dying for a Hamburger: Modern Meat Processing and the Epidemic of Alzheimer s Disease Online, Download pd.

Dying for a Hamburger. Murray Waldman, Marjorie Lamb. Dying for a Hamburger. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Dying for a Hamburger from your list? Dying for a Hamburger. Modern Meat Processing and the Epidemic of Alzheimer's Disease. Published June 30, 2005 by Thomas Dunne Books. When he was about fifty years old, my father collapsed over dinner at a restaurant one evening.

Modern Meat Processing and the Epidemic of Alzheimer's Disease. by Murray Waldman, MD and Marjorie Lamb. and that mad cow disease and its human equivalent, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, other encephalitic diseases and Alzheimer's may have a common antecedent.

Dying for a Hamburger: Modern Meat Processing and the Epidemic of Alzheimer's Disease. It's widely accepted nowadays that memory loss comes with age. Alzheimer's currently robs at least 15 million people of their identity worldwide. This book makes the controversial claim that eating meat may contribute to the development of the disease.

The book is called Dying for a Hamburger: Modern Meat Processing and the Epidemic of Alzheimer's Disease. Dr. David Westaway of the University of Toronto says Alzheimer's isn't a prion disease, and adds that experiments have shown it isn't transmissible. It was written by Toronto coroner Dr. Murray Waldman and Marjorie Lamb and it blames hamburgers for an "epidemic of Alzheimer's disease. Waldman argues hamburger is the main source of prions, a type of malformed protein which trigger the disease in the aged. Waldman also quotes the studies of University of Indiana epidemiologist Dr. Hugh Hendrie.

lock Your payment will be securely processed. Questions or problems donating? Maybe later. Alzheimer's disease - Popular works, Meat industry and trade - Health aspects - Popular works, Meat - Health aspects - Popular works. Thomas Dune Books/St.

Epidemiologist Dr. Hugh Hendrie of the University of Indiana, whose studies are quoted in Waldman's Dying for a Hamburger: Modern meat processing and the epidemic of Alzheimer's disease, was cited as saying that Waldman and co-author Marjorie Lamb have misinterpreted his findings. Hugh Hendrie of the University of Indiana, whose studies are quoted in Waldman's Dying for a Hamburger: Modern meat processing and the epidemic of Alzheimer's disease, was cited as saying that Waldman and co-author Marjorie Lamb have misinterpreted his findings, adding, "There's no evidence of Alzheimer's being a prion-caused disease.

One in ten people older than sixty-five, and nearly half of those older than eighty-five, have Alzheimer's disease. It's widely accepted nowadays that memory loss comes with age. Alzheimer's currently robs at least 15 million people of their identity worldwide. This book makes the controversial claim that eating meat may contribute to the development of the disease. In Dying for a Hamburger, Dr. Murray Waldman and Marjorie Lamb draw upon documentary evidence, historical testimony, and inspired speculation to suggest that Alzheimer's: - is a new disease--elderly people did not experience symptoms of dementia in such alarming numbers in the past- began appearing after modern meat production techniques were introduced- has soared in nations where these techniques are used- hardly exists in cultures where meat consumption is low- has been attributed to many deaths that are actually the human equivalent of mad cow disease. They present startling evidence that Alzheimer's may be part of a family of diseases linked to malformed proteins known as prions. They hypothesize that the conditions that allow these brain disorders to be triggered are similar. They propose that mad cow, its human equivalent, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), other encephalitic diseases, and Alzheimer's may have a common antecedent. We know that a form of CJD is transmitted to humans who eat contaminated beef. And we are becoming increasingly aware of the need to monitor the meat supply closely to avoid a repetition of the mad cow scare in Great Britain. But suppose that Alzheimer's also involves prions--the evidence that points in this direction is growing. And suppose that Alzheimer's is also associated with tainted meat. This conclusion seems far-fetched--at first. In this compelling book, the authors come to a frightening conclusion about our seemingly insatiable hunger for hamburgers. Destined to provoke heated argument, this book is definitely food for thought.
Diredefender
I appreciated the clinical portion in the beginning of the book it provided a great foundation. Moving along the practical side of what may be causing the rise in dementia has shed considerable light on what we as individuals can do to protect ourselves. Thank you for your work.
Najinn
What a fascinating and highly readable book--when was the last time you raced through a non-fiction treatise?

Dr. Waldman and Ms. Lamb have written a winner, and I'm sorry to see it buried in the Amazon stacks without notice or acclaim. I don't even remember how I stumbled on this title but I'm glad I did. In the process of explaining how a hamburger may permanently alter your brain--for the worse--the authors take the reader through the history of cognition and aging as found in scientific textbooks, philosophy, and literature to prove that losing your marbles through the years is a new phenomenon.

Then they move on to cannibalism, horrific neurodegenerative diseases, the germ theory of disease, the biology of prions, the evolving nature of the human diet, the complex relationship of humans to cattle, the meat-packing industry, and international food standards.

Consider the elegance of their explanation of misfolded proteins (the biological basis of neurodegenerative diseases) as seen in the common egg white:

"Imagine a large bowl of raw egg whites. These whites are made of a protein called albumin, which is folded in a unique way.. Because of its shape, this protein is a translucent liquid and can be dissolved in water, Now place a tiny amount of the egg whites in boiling water, where it cooks immediately. The protein is still albumin, but now it is a solid instead of a liquid...there is no way that the cooked egg whites can be made to revert to their uncooked state. All these changes happen because the protein is now folded in a different manner."

Want to better understand how you might possibly cook your brains with a misguided modern diet and the inattention of those to whom we entrust our food supply? Order one of these bargain copies of "Dying for a Hamburger"--this book is great food for thought.
JoJoshura
Great book. If humans were infected with prions, the Congo Red would stain amyloid and prions tissue samples for precise identification by doctors motivated to stop it.
Altad
This well researched book is a must for everyone who is interested in a healthy lifestyle and the truth and risks relating to our diets and the meat industry. The reader could do well in googling "prion" to learn more about this type proteien which appears to be kept very much under covers by the medical and pharmaceutical fraternity.
Voodoozragore
The author's idea in this book is that countries that eat more beef have a higher rate of Alzheimer's Disease and thus there is likely a "mad cow" link. His star countries as examples were "Nigeria" and "India", that have "virtually no Alzheimer's." The only problem is his facts are not accurate: more like India has the same rate of Alzheimer's as the US and Nigeria has an even higher rate than the US.

This book has some interesting Alzheimer clinical facts and the same old rehashed Kuru and CJD stories. But "Brain Trust" was a more interesting attempt at a similar albeit also similarly weak argument -- so if you want to just read an Art Bell theory, go for "Brain Trust" over this book since it's more fun to read.

I find it annoying when authors use extremely weak circumstantial barely data to try to prove their argument, and here is yet another example.

Just do a little research and you will find that mad cow disease is a fairly well understood process, while Alzheimer's with its plaques and tangles is not a well understood process. Also look at how much money is being poured into Alzheimer's research -- if it was simply caused by mad cow prions, I think this would be known by now.
Moralsa
I heard an interview with one of the authors, Dr. Murray Waldman, and ordered this book immediately. Dr. Waldman's father died of Alzheimer's. I lost a beloved mother to Alzheimer's. I have a powerful interest in understanding this disease and whether children and grandchildren of someone with AD -- and so on down the family line -- might someday develop this terrible ailment.
Dr. Waldman has been the chief of an emergency department, the chief of staff of a rehabilitation hospital, and a coroner in Toronto.
In this book, Waldman and Lamb examine the history and pattern of Alzheimer's. They are historical, medical, sleuths.
The bottom line is that they believe Alzheimer's is a type of prion disease, like mad cow disease (BSE) and Creutzfeld-Jakob Disease (CJD).
They discuss the modern methods of meat processing, and why modern methods increase risks to consumers, compared to the old-fashioned methods used generations ago.
Specifically, they point to hamburger as a problem area, because hamburger meat may include parts of many cows. This increases the risk of exposure to BSE, and hence, in Waldman's and Lamb's point of view, to AD as well as CJD.
This book is very well-written. While it addresses medical issues, it is written in a way that is accessible to readers who don't have a medical degree.
If you are a vegetarian or a vegan: read this book.
If you have a family member who has Alzheimer's: read this book.
Wire
I happened upon this book, and after reading the inside flap, I was drawn in. Being one who doesn't eat a lot of meat, I was curious as to the authors' hypotheses surrounding various prion diseases (Alzheimer's, CJD, BSE). At first, I prepared myself for reading this book over several weeks, but when I started reading, I couldn't put it down! That says a lot--this book is wonderfully written, for the medical expert and layperson alike, and easy to follow. The authors have done an excellent job of making their case for the link between the modern meat industry, forced cannibalism of cattle and prion diseases. If you're eating meat, read this book. Even if you're not eating meat, read this book--today!

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