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» » Note Found In a Bottle
Note Found In a Bottle e-book

Author:

Susan Cheever

Category:

Fitness

Subcategory:

Addiction & Recovery

ePub size:

1490 kb

Other formats:

lrf docx doc azw

Rating:

4.1

Publisher:

Simon Schuster Trade (1990)

ISBN:

0965078833

Note Found In a Bottle e-book

by Susan Cheever


Susan Cheever is the bestselling author of thirteen previous books, including five novels and the memoirs Note Found in a Bottle and Home Before Dark. Her work has been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award and won the Boston Globe Winship Medal.

Susan Cheever is the bestselling author of thirteen previous books, including five novels and the memoirs Note Found in a Bottle and Home Before Dark. She is a Guggenheim Fellow, a member of the Corporation of Yaddo, and a member of the Author's Guild Council.

Note Found in a Bottle book. I absolutely love Susan Cheever's writing, undoubtedly thanks to a combination of her conversational tone, warmth, steady eye for detail and, perhaps, most important of all, her honesty. A book like this, whereby the dominant story is the author's failings and falls - into the bottle, and into many beds or out of marriages - is addictive to read but, I would imagine, requires guts to write.

Note Found in a Bottle - Susan Cheever.

Born into a world ruled and defined by the cocktail hour, in which the solution to any problem could be found in a dry martini or another glass of wine, Susan Cheever led a life both charmed and damned. She and her father, the celebrated writer John Cheever, were deeply affected and troubled by alcohol. Note Found in a Bottle - Susan Cheever.

Note Found in a Bottle (. .has been added to your Cart. Born into a world ruled and defined by the cocktail hour, in which the solution to any problem could be found in a dry martini or another glass of wine, Susan Cheever led a life both charmed and damned. She and her celebrated father, John Cheever, were deeply affected and troubled by alcohol.

Note Found in a Bottle. 0 5 Kirjailija: Susan Cheever

Note Found in a Bottle. 0 5 Kirjailija: Susan Cheever. Saatavilla e-kirjana. She and her father, the celebrated writer John Cheever, were deeply affected and troubled by alcohol

Drinking in America is something of a passion project for Cheever, who is a recovering alcoholic (she’s been sober more than 20 years), a memoirist about her addiction (Note Found in a Bottle), and the daughter of John Cheever, one of the 20th century’s more famous alcoholics.

Drinking in America is something of a passion project for Cheever, who is a recovering alcoholic (she’s been sober more than 20 years), a memoirist about her addiction (Note Found in a Bottle), and the daughter of John Cheever, one of the 20th century’s more famous alcoholics. Now she’s glad she did. The history books that we revere, you never know who the writer is, where he-or Doris, she jokes, is coming from. My Life as a Drinker. This book changes the angle of the mirror, focusing on the role of alcohol in her growing up, her affairs and marriages, the birth of her two children, and her work. Drinking was her heritage: The ship on which her ancestors came to the New World carried three times as much beer as water, along with ten thousand gallons of wine. She teaches in the Bennington College .

Электронная книга "Note Found in a Bottle", Susan Cheever

Электронная книга "Note Found in a Bottle", Susan Cheever. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Note Found in a Bottle" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

could be found in a dry martini or another glass of wine, Susan Cheever led a life both charmed and damned. She and her father, the celebrated writer John Chee. Похожие книги: John Cheever: Collected Stories and Other Writings (Library of America, No. 188).


Burking
Written by a true alcoholic...and by a true person in recovery. Thank you for your honesty, it was wonderful and refreshing.
Ielonere
It was ok but pretty basic text.
Reighbyra
I read this in 2 days & found it interesting, well written & true as far as it went-- which wasn't that far. It is superficial & it is frustrating because even by the end I was not convinced that she considers herself to be an alcoholic. There is little "deep" introspection & she says over & over that she just didn;t realize what part alcohol played in her life choices. Can someone that smart really be that dumb?? Maybe that is the lesson of this book. I felt sorry for her because she was spoon fed booze by her parents & the drinking lifestyle in her upper-class/artsy cliques wasn't just acceptable it was mandatory. The changes in perception from the 1950's to now about the hazards & consequences of drinking are huge & for the better but it is so hard for me to understand how anyone could drink that much & not SEE it's impact on their life & the lives of those around them. Especially once her father finally sobered up!! Wasn't that a major CLUE to her?? I guess I suffer from the problem that non-drinkers have where is concerns alcoholics. We see it so clearly & they refuse to see it at all & they will lie and deny & shape shift & destroy just so they can keep drinking. Maybe deeper self-inspection is too painful because she did damage her kids because of the booze. But that would be the main reason to write such a memoir. This book needed HER specific, unique perspective on the drinkers life because there are indeed many other such memoirs around. There are bits & pieces here that are unique but overall it just wasn't enough.
Trex
If you are not an alcoholic, you might not "get" this book. Throughout this memoir Susan Cheever describes decades of self-indulgent, hedonistic, immoral behavior engaged in while under the influence of alcohol. Her life, like the lives of many alcoholics, was defined by alcohol (hence the title of the book). Her alcoholism and all of its accompanying behaviors was inherited, and in many ways encouraged by her alcoholic parent(s?) (her father was definitely an alcoholic, her mother definitely a drinker).

Some reviewers panned this book because they felt she constantly engaged in name-dropping -- she is the daughter of a famous writer who grew up among many other famous writers, and being among famous people was just her life, and she does not glamorize or express false humility about it.

Maybe this is just one of those alcoholic "insider" books, like the book "Alcoholics Anonymous", which many non-alcoholics may find tedious and depressing. Self-reflection occurs throughout the book, but it is done in a non-self-judgemental way, like when her newborn daughter was put under medical observation for tremors -- she mentioned that she (and at the time, most people) were not aware of the effects alcohol could have on a developing fetus. Trust me, Susan today is probably cringing at most of her previous alcohol-fueled behavior. But in order to recover alcoholics have to accept and forgive themselves, otherwise they will drink again. Getting over the shame of who they have been is part of every alcoholics' recovery.

Thank you, Susan Cheever, for writing this book, and thank you for writing the Bill Wilson book. And thank you for publishing your father's journals.
Era
By her own account, Susan Cheever has had quite a romp. For nearly six heady decades she's had her fill of dry Martinis, fine wines, champagne, Famous Grouse scotch, and up to three famous lovers in a single day. Publishing doors have swung open to her as the daughter of a revered writer and the wife of three other writers. (The most poignant parts of this book heavily owe their style to her father. Who but John Cheever, in the 1978 Preface to his "Stories," characterized the post-war years in NYC as a time when "almost everybody wore a hat"? Susan writes: "the men all wore brimmed felt hats trimmed with grosgrain ribbon.") Now, in her ninth book, a memoir, she assures us she has turned her back on her drunken, sluttish ways. She promises to tell all, while omitting almost everything, including the surname of her first husband. (Cowley-- it's in the biography of John Cheever.) She says she has found God and given up alcohol for hard candy. She says she is now lying sober in the arms of her current lover, having cleared away her drunken husbands along with the bottles on the sideboard. But is she truly reformed? Why is this book about drinking strangely free of morning-after headaches? Why aren't there scenes of Susan desperately guzzling rubbing alcohol? (Even Kitty Dukakis drank some strange brews.) Herein lies the problem with "Note." While Susan may now be sober, she's still narcissistic, and she's not sorry. And why should she be, exactly? She has had a fun life. She can't quite resist the temptation of dropping all those famous names (and many, many more in the pages of thanks following the text). Yet we never get to know the "real Susan." "Note" irritates, packaged as it is as a trendy confession of a sot who has seen the light. Why not just level with us, Susan: Your life has been a lucky one, full of marvelous things that were given to you. Why turn it into this silly, silly drunkalog?

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