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» » Celibates and Other Lovers
Celibates and Other Lovers e-book

Author:

Walter Keady

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

United States

ePub size:

1527 kb

Other formats:

txt rtf docx mbr

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

MacMurray & Beck; First Edition edition (November 1, 1997)

Pages:

225

ISBN:

1878448773

Celibates and Other Lovers e-book

by Walter Keady


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Celibates & other lovers. by. Keady, Walter, 1934-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Francis Ong on October 15, 2010.

Walter Keady presents a wonderful tale with, "Celibates And Other Lovers", that is a charming change of pace. This is an enjoyable book, thanks to Keady's easy style and wit. The confession of Philpot Emmet is one of the funniest descriptions I've read in some time, I laughed hard. Maybe it's because I'm an Irish Catholic. I would have been a bit more comfortable with the book if it omitted the final collision Phelim and Catherine.

Excerpted from Celibates and Other Lovers: There was nothing else that Phelim could say, especially with Annie May standing there looking daggers at him. I'll be seeing you, he said and turned his back on them. And he resolved as he climbed the wall out onto the road that he would have a long talk in private with Pisspot the first chance he got.

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This book was originally published prior to 1923, and represents a reproduction of an important historical work, maintaining the same format as the original work. While some publishers have opted to apply OCR (optical character recognition) technology to the process, we believe this leads to sub-optimal results (frequent typographical errors, strange characters and confusing formatting) and does not adequately preserve the historical character of the original artifact.

Book Lovers Day (aka National Book Lovers Day in the US) is celebrated on August 9 every year. This is an unofficial holiday observed to encourage bibliophiles celebrate reading and literature. People are advised to put away their smartphones and every possible technological distraction and pick up a book to read. Book Lovers Day is widely recognized on global scale yet its origin and creator remain unknown to date.

Celibates and Other Lovers" is a witty, great . Written by Walter Keady, a Hudson Valley (NY) resident these days, I thougt it was pretty good

Celibates and Other Lovers" is a witty, great read about a young man in a small town in Ireland (set after World War II), who is determined to become a priest, despite the efforts of a young lady, who refuses to believe that he would choose the church over her charms. Filled with wonderful dialogue, you'll think you are sitting by a window sill watching all these Irish characters, situations, feuds, and stories hapenning right across from you. Written by Walter Keady, a Hudson Valley (NY) resident these days, I thougt it was pretty good. Her books don't tax your mind in the least, and the stories are pleasant and entertaining enough to take you across the Altantic.

Celibates and Other Lovers - Walter Keady. The Complete Walter Keady Book List. FictionDB is committed to providing the best possible fiction reference information. Celibates and Other Lovers. Published: Oct-1997 (Hardcover). If you have any issues with the site, please don't hesitate to contact us.

It is 1945, and in a rural Irish village called Creevagh, a young man waits eagerly for the mail, convinced that one letter will bring his salvation. Since the age of reason, Phelim O'Brien has been obsessed by a morbid fear of hell; and from the age of puberty, tormented by the certainty he'll wind up there. But his friend, Philpot Emmett, refuses to accept that the slightest tittle of carnal pleasure is a mortal sin, and where Phelim struggles, Philpot happily yields. Father Coyne admonishes, Catherine Ryan tempts, and the formidable Maura Higgins rebels against them all, vanguard of the encroaching modern values that are slowly changing the face of village life. This is an this endearing and sweetly funny first novel, by an engaging and talented new writer.
Eta
I enjoyed this slice-of-life book very much. I was a bit wary at first. Since I'm not a christian, I wasn't sure how much I would identify with what the cover implied was the main character. However, this isn't really about Phelim so much as it is about his town. It presents you with pictures of various people throughout the town and without so much poking fun at them, lets you laugh at their hang-ups and foibles like you would laugh at a much loved sister or brother.
Fordrekelv
The last few books I have read that have taken place on this particular island have been depressing even by the stories that normally come from this geographic point. Mr. Walter Keady presents a wonderful tale with, "Celibates And Other Lovers", that is a charming change of pace.
There is great humor both in quantity and quality, however it is not trying to lighten a general tragedy or the misfortune of others. This is not dark much less black humor; this is just great amusing interaction among people that is almost uniformly without rancor of any kind. The book is not explicit either in language or human relations. A word here and there that would generally be considered profane, are so few they go almost unnoticed. And because they are not scattered through every bit of dialogue, they have the same impact as hearing an expletive from a source you have never expected it from. Writers, who rely on vulgarity as a cornerstone of their work, are like comedians that do the same with their standup, after a period of time passes, you become numb to it.
Mr. Keady also treats relations between couples with a consideration that is rare. He shows touching intimacy, not to be confused with graphic and explicit which is what lousy writers place on a page, embarrassing situations, in all, very human. A couple may be caught behind a haystack, but the event is of note not because of what they have yet to get to, rather who it is that finds them, and the dialogue that ensues.
Religion too is dealt with in a manner that is not without its controversy, but the Author does not sink to the Priest as a pedophile that has become the staple of so many stories. Such Priests exist, but they are not to be found on every Church Altar a person may enter. I would imagine the young man on his path to the Priesthood, and the struggles and stumbles he makes, will leave readers with the idea these men are human, they have weaknesses, but those weaknesses are not by definition that of a felon or a seriously damaged mind.
The title of the book is not indicative of prevailing behavior among the book's Clergy, so please don't pass the book because of it. The book is a well-written story that on balance leaves you feeling good about virtually all the people you have read about. The characters are not perfect, but they are not at the other end closing upon deviance either.
Error parents
Celibates and Other Lovers is a novel written like a series of intertwined short stories, never quite coming together as a true novel should. Taking place in the village of Creevagh, this slight book is an example of "cute" Irish literature, with its silly characters, the expected Irish wake, and the overwhelming authority of the Roman Catholic church; all pushed together to form this superficial look at rural Ireland in the 40's and 50's. (Although you rarely get a good sense of time period other than the occasional pointed reference.) On the other hand, my mother, a first generation Irish-American, loved this book and found it to be very truthful, so I might not be the perfect audience for this one.
Majin
I had just finished reading 'Angela's Ashes' and was still under an "Irish spell" when somebody recommended this book to me. I absolutely loved the way the author weaves the stories of the different people of the small Parish of Creevagh to offered one insightful look into the human soul. The dialogues are written so you feel you are eave-dropping into these people's conversations. I only wish that the author had taken more time to revealed/explored what was driving Phelim O'Brien in a direction he obviously was not supposed to be heading to. Been from Upstate NY, it was nice to learned Mr. Keady is a Hudson Valley resident. I am looking forward to more of his writing. May I suggest a sequel?...I MUST know what happens to Catherine, Phillipot and Phelim.....PLEASE!!!!
Galanjov
If you want to have some fun reading about and listening to some wonderfully REAL characters, then this is the book for you. If you want to FEEL the generosity and the small-mindedness, the bigotry and the humor of people in small-town Ireland, then you just have to read it. If you want also to get some sense of the smothering impact of the Roman Catholic Church on the people of the town, ditto. It's a genuinely funny, droll, touching book about a group of characters--saints and sinners all--I came to like and care about a lot.
generation of new
This is an enjoyable book, thanks to Keady's easy style and wit. The confession of Philpot Emmet is one of the funniest descriptions I've read in some time, I laughed hard. Maybe it's because I'm an Irish Catholic. I would have been a bit more comfortable with the book if it omitted the final collision Phelim and Catherine. It seemed too extreme for the otherwise light-hearted and affectionate look at a society that never really existed yet lives on in more ways than we'll ever admit!
Amarin
There is something very cinematic about the way Keady shows us the lives of his rural characters. You can see them and you can certainly hear them. I especially like the dry wit with which he lampoons the Catholic Church's stand on certain issues, like sex and welfare. While the village characters aren't particularly brilliant for the most part, they are never made fun of (except those who deserve it). Quite a refreshing novel.

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