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» » Spooner
Spooner e-book

Author:

Pete Dexter

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

United States

ePub size:

1977 kb

Other formats:

mobi rtf lrf docx

Rating:

4.6

Publisher:

Grand Central Publishing; Large Print edition (September 24, 2009)

Pages:

784

ISBN:

0446562440

Spooner e-book

by Pete Dexter


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Warren Spooner was born after a prolonged delivery in a makeshift delivery room in a doctor's office in Milledgeville.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Oddball, accident-prone Warren Spooner doesn't so much get along with life as crash into it head-on. Through the awkward scrapes of his childhood, to a violent and troubled adulthood, the young man is nothing if not resilient, standing up to adversity in his own dark (often extremely dark) ways. Hilarious and heartbreaking, US National Book Award-winner Pete Dexter's autobiographical magnum opus is nothing short of a tragicomic tour de force.

This author, Pete Dexter, won the National Book Award in 1988 for Paris Trout. I had heard of that but didn't remember the author nor had I read any of his other books. We live surrounded by riches: so many great writers of whom we may never have heard, much less read.

Pete Dexter (born July 22, 1943) is an American novelist. National Book Award in 1988 for his novel Paris Trout. Dexter was born in Pontiac, Michigan. His father died when Dexter was four; and he and his mother moved to Milledgeville, Georgia, where she married a college Physics professor. He earned his undergraduate degree in 1969 from the University of South Dakota, which awarded him an honorary Doctor of Letters and Literature in 2010.

An eye had been knocked out of the boy’s head.

An eye had been knocked out of the boy’s head ecially in South Philadelphia, and had glimpsed the rules that held the place together. Which is to say that he should have seen the column for the intrusion it was. Still, it looked harmless enough

Pete Dexter writes books about damaged goods, about men (invariably men) who are defined by their actions but . All of which makes Warren Spooner a rarity. Against all odds, Dexter's hero remains intact. The book itself is not so lucky.

Pete Dexter writes books about damaged goods, about men (invariably men) who are defined by their actions but who act without quite knowing what they are after. Some of these characters are downright dangerous, while others emerge as noble innocents. All, one suspects, are fighting blind and destined for the ropes. It comes broken down the middle, front-loaded with greatness, and imperfectly set. Topics.

Read Spooner, by Pete Dexter online on Bookmate – Oddball, accident-prone Warren Spooner doesn't so much get along with life as crash into it head-on. Through the awkward scrapes of his childhood, t. Oddball, accident-prone Warren Spooner doesn't so much get along with life as crash into it head-on.

Аудиокнига "Spooner", Pete Dexter. Читает Tom Stechschulte. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Pete Dexter began his working life with a . Post office in New Orleans, Louisiana

Warren Spooner was born after a prolonged delivery in a makeshift delivery room in a doctor's office in Milledgeville, Georgia, on the first Saturday of December, 1956. His father died shortly afterward, long before Spooner had even a memory of his face, and was replaced eventually by a once-brilliant young naval officer, Calmer Ottosson, recently court-martialed out of service. Pete Dexter began his working life with a . Post office in New Orleans, Louisiana. He wasn't very good at mail and quit, then caught on as a newspaper reporter in Florida, which he was not very good at, got married, and was not very good at that.

Warren Spooner was born after a prolonged delivery in a makeshift delivery room in a doctor's office in Milledgeville, Georgia, on the first Saturday of December, 1956. His father died shortly afterward, long before Spooner had even a memory of his face, and was replaced eventually by a once-brilliant young naval officer, Calmer Ottosson, recently court-martialed out of service. This is the story of the lifelong tie between the two men, poles apart, of Spooner's troubled childhood, troubled adolescence, violent and troubled adulthood and Calmer Ottosson's inexhaustible patience, undertaking a life-long struggle to salvage his step-son, a man he will never understand.
Whiteseeker
A while back, I watched an offbeat movie on Netflix that I had never heard of, called The Paper Boy. I thought it was terrific and decided to see if the movie had been based upon a book. It was, and its author was Pete Dexter. I did a Google search and found that Mr. Dexter had written at least a half dozen other novels, including Spooner. Since its paperback version was nearly 500 pages, I didn't think the Kindle price of $8.99 was such a bad deal, so I bought it. Boy, am I glad I did. Right off the bat, however, let me tell you that this is not a book for everyone, but if you enjoy the storytelling of Joseph Heller and John Irving, I think you'll absolutely love Spooner.
Essentially, this is a complex biography about two men - Warren Spooner and his stepfather, Calmer Ottosson - and their unusual and unlikely relationship. In a way, it's a kind of love story. Now, before you go getting all worked up and saying "I don't want to read any love story about two men," just relax. We're talking stepfather-stepson love here, nothing perverted. On the contrary. It's all about mutual respect, some given and some earned.
On more than one occasion while reading this book, my wife heard me laugh aloud, sometimes hysterically; that is the essential nature of Spooner. Indeed, it is a very funny book. However, it is also a complex tragic story, replete with a sense of poignancy that I always seem attracted to.
I can't wait to read another of Mr. Dexter's books. But for now, I would suggest you get started with Spooner. I promise you won't be disappointed.
Mave
This is a dangerous book. It takes you through a long journey into dark genius, and exiting into mystery and wonder. Along the way you are treated to a world of the blessed unsane, the perilously sane, the bizarre, the whimsical, and the disturbed gallantly leaping from tipsy stone to black ice coated boulders lining a Cliffside that ends in shattered rock. If, at some point, you do not wonder whether your parents actually named you Spooner, but were prescient enough to grasp the consequence, you have wasted your time.
Wiliniett
I enjoyed this book from start to finish. Spooner's life is very much like the life of Pete Dexter which may have made his writing about even the craziest events seem very real. Be prepared for a lot of humor and some insight into human development. The influence of a very fine step-father made all the difference and is a lesson for us all. Spooner is pretty much a man's man and I'd like to know how his wife handled all that trait implies.. Maybe the next book should be "Wife of Spooner".
Xor
Awesome. Can't get better than this. One thing leads to another. Dexter takes the premise: What's the worst thing that could happen in any given situation? And blows it apart.
Fenrinos
My take on Spooner may be a little different than most readers. Dexter was a columnist for the Sacramento Bee in the 1980s and I was a regular reader of those columns. I met him a couple of times at functions in Sacramento and have an autographed copy of the original hardbound version of Paris Trout. I recall some of the incidents in Spooner as having been the subject of some of those columns. One incident that really stood out: when Spooner has his problems at a bar in Philadelphia, I recalled several Bee columns in which Dexter discussed his own mishaps in a Philadelphia bar in partnership with the boxer Randall (Tex) Cobb. (Dexter was a columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer before he came to Sacramento.) I'm not discussing this incident in more detail because that part of the book is an important part of the story and I don't want to give anything away.

Having said that, I enjoyed Spooner very much. Parts are serious, parts are funny, and, as was stated in a quote on the cover, it is a Garpian tale (as in "The World According to Garp", I assume). It is also a very different book than Paris Trout.
Glei
Reminded me of the strung together farces of a John Irving novel. Pete Dexter has a marvelous flair for analogy. With a central theme of 'you don't have as much say in your life as you think you do', you wouldn't expect to find yourself laughing as often you will. The real irony is the books funniest scenes all involve death. The details of Spooner's mother's death is priceless and though it involves both the death of his mother and Silly the bulldog, it is as good of a tragically farcical scene as you'll ever read and I defy you not to at least smile, if not laugh out loud.

My only knock is that the arc of the story ended up too much in Calmer's head at the end and it sort of ran down like wind-up toy rather then dropping off a cliff, as you might expect from the rest of the plot. In that Spooner's life was always thrust upon him and he was mostly along for the ride, the ending is true to the rest of the book and Dexter certainly would have betrayed the story with a neat and tidy ending.

All in all, it's a great read. You'll walk away with at least three or four new 'one liners' stuck in your world view.
Keramar
Even the acknowledgments are incredibly funny. Dexter makes it look effortless. The understated regionalisms, the crafty plot structure, the characters you could swear you keep bumping into in real life, well, it all accumulates and you start wishing everybody at work would just shut up so you could finish up, go home, and read your book. Then you realize it can't be effortless or you'd have read more novels as amazing as this. You start regretting that Spooner's going to end sooner or later, so you check the copyright dates on Dexter's other novels in order to figure out how fast he writes and therefore how long before the next one is published. Don't even bother denying it, because we all know you.

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