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» » What Have I Ever Lost by Dying?: Collected Prose Poems
What Have I Ever Lost by Dying?: Collected Prose Poems e-book

Author:

Robert Bly

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Poetry

ePub size:

1925 kb

Other formats:

doc rtf txt lrf

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Perennial; Reprint edition (May 1, 1993)

Pages:

112

ISBN:

0060923652

What Have I Ever Lost by Dying?: Collected Prose Poems e-book

by Robert Bly


The book showed Bly attempting to unite public and private realms in poetry, a project that would continue to influence both his own . The Morning Poems are the best Robert Bly has written. What Have I Ever Lost by Dying?: Collected Prose Poems, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1992.

The book showed Bly attempting to unite public and private realms in poetry, a project that would continue to influence both his own work and his role as a public poet. In 1966, Bly cofounded American Writers against the Vietnam War, led much of the opposition among writers to that war, and even contributed his National Book Award prize money to the antiwar effort. His new and selected poems Eating the Honey of Words (1999) was also widely praised.

Collected Prose Poems as Want to Read . One of the first books of poetry I ever bought, way back when, as a high school student struggling to make sense of life through poetry

Collected Prose Poems as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. I love Robert Bly's prose poems! There is so much about nature and everyday life in these poems, yet there is fantasy and a transport into another realm with his comparisons that I find touching. One of the first books of poetry I ever bought, way back when, as a high school student struggling to make sense of life through poetry. I was challenged and changed by Bly's cunning use of poetic devices, and it remains one of the most impactful books I've ever read as a poet.

Collected Prose Poems Paperback – Unabridged, May 1, 1993. Robert Bly is a poet who has been around for a long time, but I discovered him only recently. What Have I Ever Lost by Dying" is a collection of his beautiful, rich prose poems. Bly is a master of intimate observation. by. Robert Bly (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Prose poems, American. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Much of Bly's 1973 book of poems Sleepers Joining Hands is concerned with this theme. What Have I Ever Lost by Dying?: Collected Prose Poems (1992). Loving a Woman in Two Worlds (1985). Selected Poems (1986). In the context of the Vietnam War, a focus on the divine feminine was seen as urgent and necessary. Since that time, the Conference has expanded to consider a wide variety of poetic, mythological, and fairy tale traditions.

Baudelaire believed that the prose poem would be the major form of the twentieth century because of its suppleness and the subtlety of its music.

Robert, you’ve wasted so much of your life Sitting indoors to write poems

Robert, you’ve wasted so much of your life Sitting indoors to write poems. Would you Do that again? I would, a thousand times. when she died you that I have never seen except nowhere in a mirror please go on showing me faces you led me to daylight the bird moment the leaves of morning as long as I look hoping to catch sight of what has not yet been seen. Robert Bly: A Thousand Years of Joy.

There's no description for this book yet.

American Prose poems.

This collection of prose poems by Robert Bly - poet, translator and author of the best-selling IRON JOHN - is drawn from those he has written during the past thirty years. The poems are organized into five sections, including The Point Reyes Poems, Family Poems, Objects and Creatures Glanced at Briefly, Love Poems, and Looking for the Rat’s Hole. In The Dead Seal, from The Point Reyes Poems, as if offering a shamanlike prayer, Bly praises the seal’s whiskers, smooth skin, and slanted eyes and asks the seal to Be comfortable in death.

What Have I Ever Lost by Dying?: Collected Prose Poems by Robert Bl. Centuries later, the Mesopotamian gods, All curls and ears, showed up; behind them the Generals With their blue-coated sons who will die at dawn

What Have I Ever Lost by Dying?: Collected Prose Poems by Robert Bly. k. Centuries later, the Mesopotamian gods, All curls and ears, showed up; behind them the Generals With their blue-coated sons who will die at dawn. Those grasshopper-eating hermits were so good To stay all day in the cave; but it is also sweet To see the fenceposts gradually appear at dawn.

Baudelaire believed that the prose poem would be the major form of the twentieth century because of its suppleness and the subtlety of its music. Robert Bly brings together a harvest of the prose poems he has been writing for more than thirty years, including a number of poems that have never appeared in book form. This collection of prose poems, drawn from work done over the past 30 years, is organized into five sections The Point Reyes Poems, Family Poems, Object and Creatures Glanced at Briefly, Love Poems, and Looking for the Rat's Hole.
Balladolbine
Robert Bly is a poet who has been around for a long time, but I discovered him only recently. "What Have I Ever Lost by Dying" is a collection of his beautiful, rich prose poems. Bly is a master of intimate observation. With sharp, exquisite language he illuminates the strange and the beautiful, both human and non-human.
Sharpbrew
"What Have I Ever Lost by Dying?" contains about seventy prose poems which cover a variety of subjects but especially center on nature poems and contemplations on plants (a meditation on a lichen plant, for one) and animals (a dying seal, several bird poems). All of these poems are enjoyable and present the subjects in interesting lights, but I felt that they were not particularly clever poems and didn't really challenge the way I see things or present their subjects in new lights. They are rather conventional poems. There is a take on a hockey game that is fun, and I particularly liked his poem "Warning to the Reader," which describes a bird trying to get out of a grain silo and then compares the bird to readers of poetry, stuck in the silo of tricky definitions and ending up "hunched in the corner with nothing in their gizzards for four days, light failing, the eyes glazed..." This nifty little turnaround makes for a fun poem, but this kind of trick ending is all too rare in this collection. Bly's work is enjoyable, and it's worth reading, but there's better to be had. Try Earle Stone's "Song of the Toad" for 500 haiku, where there are hundreds of nature poems for your reading pleasure. Maybe it's the medium, prose poetry, but this collection plods where is should soar.
Wanenai
I enjoy Bly's translations and anthologies; therefore, I try his poetry ... this time, only to be disappointed. And from his introduction to the early poems, I suspect he detects the same flaw as I. He says "When I composed the first of these poems, ... I hoped that a writer could describe and object or a creature without claiming it, without immersing it like a negative in his developing tank of disappointment and desire. I no longer think that is possible". He later mentions that the style of the object poems is usually spare - that he is unusual in accepting the human fantasy that closes many of his poems.
Despite the warnings, Bly's style in this poems appears inconsistent - he begins in the concrete but quickly dissolves into intellectual images i.e. images that display a highly creative, broadly educated intellect that has gone into itself rather than staying in the concrete moment that began the poem. The result is a poem in which the poet seems centered neither in the poem nor the object of the poem but rather in his own mind.
There are some wonderful images, some superb turns of phrase, some excellent reinterpretations of unlikely topics (see his take on hockey) but the poems as a whole remain unsatisfying.

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