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» » A Phone Call to the Future: New and Selected Poems
A Phone Call to the Future: New and Selected Poems e-book

Author:

Mary Jo Salter

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Poetry

ePub size:

1429 kb

Other formats:

lrf lrf txt docx

Rating:

4.7

Publisher:

Knopf; First Edition edition (March 4, 2008)

Pages:

240

ISBN:

0307267180

A Phone Call to the Future: New and Selected Poems e-book

by Mary Jo Salter


Mary Jo Salter is the author of five previous books of poetry and a children’s book, The Moon Comes Home. When her name appears, haltingly, in one of the last of the eight parts, I am jilted to the reality- This woman, described in the poem-she is, in fact dead

Mary Jo Salter is the author of five previous books of poetry and a children’s book, The Moon Comes Home. She is a professor in the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University. She divides her time between Amherst, Massachusetts, and Baltimore. When her name appears, haltingly, in one of the last of the eight parts, I am jilted to the reality- This woman, described in the poem-she is, in fact dead. I know it seems obvious, but I guess it was so striking for me because it is the tradition classically to euphemistically dance around the sadness that is someone's death.

A Phone Call to the Future: New and Selected Poems. Random House Digital, Inc. 2009. ISBN 978-0-375-71156-5.

Selected translations. Children's literature. A Phone Call to the Future: New and Selected Poems.

Superb new poems from one of the major poets of her generation, along with a selection of the best from Mary Jo Salter’s previous award-winning collections. In Mary Jo Salter’s poetry we have a unique blend of domestic drama and the grittier wider world

Superb new poems from one of the major poets of her generation, along with a selection of the best from Mary Jo Salter’s previous award-winning collections. In Mary Jo Salter’s poetry we have a unique blend of domestic drama and the grittier wider world. In the title poem, she reimagines the technological simplicities and humanistic verities of the past with a brilliantly d Superb new poems from one of the major poets of her generation, along with a selection of the best from Mary Jo Salter’s previous award-winning collections.

Salter’s latest collection, A Phone Call to the Future, offers severely winnowed selections from her previous five books along with an ample collection of new poems. What she has omitted is as revealing as what remains

Salter’s latest collection, A Phone Call to the Future, offers severely winnowed selections from her previous five books along with an ample collection of new poems. What she has omitted is as revealing as what remains.

This wholly attractive volume that brings together twenty-five years of elegantly shaped and voiced creations (William Pritchard, The Boston Globe) offers a generous sampling of Mary Jo Salter’s five previous award-winning volumes and a collection of superb new poems. A mid-career retrospective of one of the major poets of her generation. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Alfred A. KnopfReleased: Sep 15, 2009ISBN: Format: book. A Phone Call to the Future - Mary Jo Salter

Salter, Mary Jo. ISBN-13.

From the start, Salter's verse can sound urbane and serious, ceremonious and supple: a nine-part elegy for a friend who died young contains a villanelle with the refrain "I know you're gone for good. And this is how:/ were you alive, you would have called by no. Other poems react to the death of Salter's mother, to her own experience of parenthood, and to life with her husband, poet and critic Brad Leithauser. Salter may be the most gifted mid-career disciple of James Merrill's work, and her detractors may say she still works in his shadow. Salter, Mary Jo.

A Phone Call to the Future: New and Selected Poems. Nothing by Design, Knopf, 2013, ISBN 978-0-385-34979-6.

YouTube Encyclopedic. Random House Digital, In. .com/books?id mSi TtzW36gC&printsec frontcover&dq Mary+Jo+Salter&hl en&ei Cw&sa X&oi book result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CC4Q6AEwAA.

New and Selected Poems. Books related to A Phone Call to the Future. Sailing Alone Around the Room.

Superb new poems from one of the major poets of her generation, along with a selection of the best from Mary Jo Salter’s previous award-winning collections.In Mary Jo Salter’s poetry we have a unique blend of domestic drama and the grittier wider world. In the title poem, she reimagines the technological simplicities and humanistic verities of the past with a brilliantly disorienting detachment. Here are poems imbued with the violence of modern life—a mother slapping her child on the subway, a child losing everything in the Iraq war—and others that bring a witty luminosity to peacocks in the park, to shoe-shine “thrones” at the airport, and to poetry itself. A tender elegy for the poet Anthony Hecht is followed by poems about the Baroque sculptor Bernini and the German Expressionist painter August Macke, which add to Salter’s already impressive list of poems about image-making. Although in many of the poems Salter looks back wistfully at what is lost, she also sets her sights on the future: "Lord, surprise me with even more to miss," she writes in “Wake-up Call.”Among the selected older poems are the much-anthologized “Welcome to Hiroshima” and “Boulevard du Montparnasse”; her historical narrative “The Hand of Thomas Jefferson”; and moving elegies for her mother (“Dead Letters”), her friend (“Elegies for Etsuko”), and her psychiatrist (“Another Session”). Here, also, are such light verse delights as “Video Blues” (“My husband has a crush on Myrna Loy”) and “A Morris Dance”; poems that bring a deeper insight into foreign settings and cultures (from “Henry Purcell in Japan” to “Icelandic Almanac” to “The Seven Weepers,” set in the Australian outback of 1845); and poems that reflect on the art of seeing, as in “Young Girl Peeling Apples” and “Trompe l’Oeil.”A Phone Call to the Future is a powerful reminder and a ringing confirmation of Mary Jo Salter’s remarkable gifts.
Zeueli
Salter's work is honest and transparent. I read it aloud in the morning as a way to start an inspired day. Great for those seeking to lead a mindful life.
FEISKO
Dr. Salter is one of the best writers alive. Her depth of language usage moves one emotionally and makes the reader a better person for the encounter.
Hugifyn
Sorry if my review is super scattered.
Bottom line: is she is a good writer.
I would give it 5 stars if it wasn't such heavy material (depressing) for me.

This may have value to you, however, and you should read it at least nice and judge for yourself. (Read on).

So-- This book of poems was a bit heavy for me , .....but still- I recommend everyone take a look at Elegies for Etsuko. I think it is / will become a classic, if it hasn't already. I will never forget it. I love all artists that take a risk to try and make a stab at voicing the pain of losing a friend....of unmasking the cloak that is a suicide. A warning to others as a "Phone Call to the Future", as it were, to realize the pain and finality that death leaves as a trail behind itself. (Not a direct quote, --just my of tieing the title into my review. I'm not sure where in the book lies this expression explicitly, if at all).

Elegies for Etsuko- I am so moved by this set of verses to Salter's friend, Etsuko Akai.
When her name appears, haltingly, in one of the last of the eight parts, I am jilted to the reality-- This woman, described in the poem--she is, in fact dead. I know it seems obvious , but I guess it was so striking for me because it is the tradition classically to euphemistically dance around the sadness that is someone's death. Instead, she faces it, states it, names it. It's almost awkward to be present for the revelations that are so personal. It is a reflection, nonetheless, of our modern style of everything becoming public. We say it. We are shocking. Nothing is taboo.

The taboo is th norm. To be the euphemistic, to cite a norm is the new taboo.

But there is the classic sad emotions in this poetry. Like the musings of Keats on his own mortality or Odes to "blank".
.
Don't misunderstand me to be disparaging this work. I just have so much thought and emotion about it that. I think it has served its purpose , no?

...Mary Jo salter. Wow. At first easy to underestimate as simplicity, she has so much to say and feel that it hurts me to read her too much. I recognize too well some of the emotions expressed here.maybe for a person given towards depression, it's less than ideal reading material for me, personally.

she has such a gift of mingling modern language and tone with an elegance that belies her own humility in describing life.
The author's nakedness is exposed, here, in "Phone Call..." in sharing such honest feelings, musings, broodings-- on losing a friend, a loved one, and on the pain that is inherent to the nagging urge to write, described in "Aubade to Brad".

I'll confess I couldn't make it through all of the text because the emotions bared in this volume were too raw for me, personally; Though, I will forever be touched and moved by her humble expressions in "Elegies to Etsuko".

Overall, the sadness within the whole book of poems was too dark for me to be able to bear at one setting. I gave my copy away and -- in some respects wishing I still had it to re-read on rare occasion. I Iike being able to empathize with someone else who feels the way that i do sometimes....it minimizes the loneliness of the human experience. Instead, though, I chose to let this gem pass on to the next reader as a donation. I hope they will enjoy the book.

Like other dense material of this depth and intensity, I love to visit it from time to time, like an old friend . But I can not, nor should I -- go there too often. Thank you, Ms, Salter for sharing so generously --I hope they have written Etsuko Akai's name in the sky, and that she is remembered always for who she was :) !
Laizel
Mary Jo Salter's hardback book sat (with other poetry books) on Hastings' sale table. I'd only heard of her, never read her. The book sat in my own shelf for a year before I pulled it out. Add my voice to those who laud her work. I especially liked "Goodbye, Train." I underlined this phrase from "Musical Chair": "... in a pond now deepening to a shade that looks like bedtime...". Her villanelle, "Refrain" is full of slant rhyme--something more of us should perhaps consider using. Repetition in the "re-" and alliteration in "Inside the Midget" caught my eye, too: "...refurnished, refinished, refined...recognize--..."
Alas, I promised it as a door prize for a poetry retreat, but if I ever see another one, it's mine. Highly recommended.
Arith
Mary Jo Salter, A Phone Call to the Future (Knopf, 2008)

So many new-and-collected books of poetry are ways to track the change in quality of an author's work over a long period of time. The early work shows shakiness and amateurism, fading into seasoned, professional work. Or, more commonly, the fresh, new voice of the early work fades into cynicism, pedantry, or repetition. Not so Mary Jo Salter; there's almost twenty-five years of material in this book, and the stuff from the earliest represented book is just as strong and assured as the new poems. Unfortunately, I had to send it back to the library before I could pull a good quote out of it, but really, I'd have had a difficult time doing so; much of this book wants to be quoted, and as it's one of the longest single-author collections I've read in the past five years (222 pp.), that would make this review a bit longer than I like to go. (Insert emoticon here.) Stop by your local library or bookstore, open to a random page, and sample for yourself. Yes, the rest of the book is really that good, and yes, you want to read it at your earliest convenience. ****
Runemane
There are few poets like I look forward to new poems by with as much anticipation as those by MJS. This collection will not disappoint--unless, like me, your reaction is going to be skip the selected work; I want to enjoy the crafted pieces by a master poet. While there are only a handful of new poems, I did do what I always promise myself but rarely follow up on: I revisited a few favorites and forgotten pieces from her earlier volumes. Some readers may lament that the poems are selected and not collected, for me it was a fine blend of new and old material. If MJS's work is new to you, you'll have the joy of discovering material from her previous collections; if you've been following her work all along, you'll be happy to read the grouping that starts the collection. Everything MJS publishes is poetry of the highest order.

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