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» » Long Life: Essays And Other Writings
Long Life: Essays And Other Writings e-book

Author:

Mary Oliver

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Poetry

ePub size:

1324 kb

Other formats:

lit lrf mobi rtf

Rating:

4.9

Publisher:

Da Capo Press; F First Edition Used edition (March 16, 2004)

Pages:

120

ISBN:

0306809958

Long Life: Essays And Other Writings e-book

by Mary Oliver


Long Life: Essays and Ot. .has been added to your Cart. Her collection of short nature essays and poems includes amazing stories and life-affirming wisdom.

Long Life: Essays and Ot. Mary Oliver is the author of twenty books, including The Leaf and the Cloud and What Do We Know. Her many accolades include the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. She lives in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Long Life: Essays and Other Writings. Winner of both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award for her poetry, Oliver also writes exquisitely lucid prose. Here, in her most generously personal essays to date, she articulates the beliefs, observations, and inspirations that feed her poetry as she contemplates the majestic beauty of the earth and its splendid creatures, including humankind.

Long Life: Essays and Other Writings, Da Capo (Cambridge, MA), 2004. Audio CD) Many Miles: Mary Oliver Reads Mary Oliver, Beacon (Boston, MA), 2010. Blue Iris: Poems and Essays, Beacon (Boston, MA), 2004. Audio CD) At Blackwater Pond: Mary Oliver Reads Mary Oliver, Beacon (Boston, MA), 2006. The Truro Bear and Other Adventures: Poems and Essays, Beacon (Boston, MA), 2008. Upstream: Selected Essays, Penguin, 2016.

Start by marking Long Life: Essays and Other Writings as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This has never been truer than in Long Life, a luminous collection of seventeen essays and ten poems. Poets must read and study, but also they must learn to tilt and whisper, shout, or dance, each in his or her own way, or we might just as well copy the old books. But, no, that would never do, for always the new self swimming around in the old world feels itself uniquely verbal.

Mary Oliver's poetry is grounded in memories of Ohio and her adoptedĀ . 2004 Long Life: Essays and Other Writings Da Capo (Cambridge, Massachusetts). ISBN 978-0-306-81412-9.

Mary Oliver's poetry is grounded in memories of Ohio and her adopted home of New England, setting most of her poetry in and around Provincetown after she moved there in the 1960s. Influenced by both Whitman and Thoreau, she is known for her clear and poignant observances of the natural world 2004 Long Life: Essays and Other Writings Da Capo (Cambridge, Massachusetts). 2016 Upstream: Selected Essays Penguin (New York, NY).

Poets must read and study, but also they must learn to tilt and whisper, shout, or dance, each in his or her own way, or we might just as well copy the old books. And that is just the point: how the world, moist and bountiful, calls to each of us to make a new and serious response. That's the big question, the one the world throws at you every morning.

Items related to Long Life: Essays And Other Writings. Oliver, Mary Long Life: Essays And Other Writings. ISBN 13: 9780306809958. Long Life: Essays And Other Writings. About the Author: Mary Oliver is the author of twenty books, including The Leaf and the Cloud and What Do We Know.

Long Life: Essays and other writings. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo, 2004.

From Long Life: Essays and Other Writings by Mary Oliver. Writings of a Christian Mystic. With Thanks to the Field Sparrow (Mary Oliver).

"The gift of Oliver's poetry is that she communicates the beauty she finds in the world and makes it unforgettable" ( Miami Herald ). This has never been truer than in Long Life , a luminous collection of seventeen essays and ten poems. With the grace and precision that are the hallmarks of her work, Oliver shows us how writing "is a way of offering praise to the world" and suggests we see her poems as "little alleluias." Whether describing a goosefish stranded at low tide, the feeling of being baptized by the mist from a whale's blowhole, or the "connection between soul and landscape," Oliver invites readers to find themselves and their experiences at the center of her world. In Long Life she also speaks of poets and writers: Wordsworth's "whirlwind" of "beauty and strangeness"; Hawthorne's "sweet-tempered" side; and Emerson's belief that "a man's inclination, once awakened to it, would be to turn all the heavy sails of his life to a moral purpose." With consummate craftsmanship, Mary Oliver has created a breathtaking volume sure to add to her reputation as "one of our very best poets" ( New York Times Book Review ).
Nilador
This book covers essays on people, the natural world, topics, philosophy and so much more. I use these essays as part of my daily meditation to get me up and going in the morning. I highly recommend it.
Mushicage
A handwritten thanks made my day! Thank you!
Cobyno
...her gifts are truly rare
Eng.Men
I did not purchase this item; but merely looked at it
Samutilar
It's Mary Oliver.... she never let's me down. Her writing grabs me before her first sentence has reached it's period. I could only hope for my writing to be so good...so inviting. I love living in Mary-land... always. Her images are so very clear. She invites all out senses to be tickled without knowing she's doing that... she's so natural and unforced in her approach... it's like being inside her head looking out through her eyes... only her eyes have a voice... LOVE HER!
Legend 33
I am a Mary Oliver fan. I love her poetry combining spirit and nature, and I can understand it. I certainly agree that writing should come from the heart; however, if it is to be published, the authors should sometimes provide a map to navigate the terrain. Not Mary Oliver. In these essays and poems, Oliver shares with us how the world calls to her and invites us to greet our world as she does hers. I particularly love:

"People say to me: wouldn't you like to see Yosemite? The Bay of Fundy? The Brooks Range? I smile and answer, 'Oh yes' sometime. And go off to my woods, my ponds, my sun-filled harbor, no more than a blue comma on the map of the world, but to me, the emblem of everything. It is the intimate, never The general, that is teacherly."
Teacherly. My computer says that is not a word. What does my computer know? I like it. Even her prose is poetic. "Every day my early morning walk along the water grants me a second waking. My feet are nimble, now my ears wake, and give thanks for the ocean's song."

I liked Part Three the least. Her praise of Emerson and Hawthorne were first published as introductions to Modern Library Classics. However, she did tickle my curiosity about Emerson. She has given me enough in her short essay to make me want to read his work now that I am an adult. I think of all the rich material which I was fed in school and only now as a mature adult can appreciate and enjoy.

Oliver does not write, here, about aging or the end of life. She writes in both prose and poetry about how full her life is. And she reminds us that full does not necessarily mean busy. She reminds me that I could live a rich and delicious life right here in my neighborhood. She reminds me that I can receive so much by being conscious. This book stays on my shelf with my other Olivers to pick back up occasionally and savor.

by Judith Helburn
for StorycircleBookReviews
[...]
reviewing books by, for, and about women
Bine
Readers of this book come away knowing that Mary Oliver wakes up each morning,

rushes outside and breathes deeply ready to fill her mind and soul with nature's

surprises of the day. There is a chapter, Dog Talk, that will warm any dog

lover's heart, including a wonderful listing of her dogs' names, past and

present. The language is gorgeous and full of imagery yet sparse.

Oliver's comment on the necessity of literature spoke to its essential place

in my life.

"The best use of literature bends not toward the narrow and the absolute

but to the extravagant and the possible. Answers are no part of it;

rather, it is the opinions, the rhapsodic persuasions, the engrafted

logics, the clues that are to the mind of the reader the possible keys

to his own self-quarrels, his own predicament."
nice book, fast shipping, thanks so much

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