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» » The Post-Birthday World
The Post-Birthday World e-book

Author:

Lionel Shriver

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

ePub size:

1905 kb

Other formats:

docx mbr rtf lrf

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

Harper-perennial; 1st edition (2007)

ISBN:

0007245157

The Post-Birthday World e-book

by Lionel Shriver


Yet when the date she proposed turned out to be Raymond or something’s birthday, Jude insisted that more would be merrier.

Yet when the date she proposed turned out to be Raymond or something’s birthday, Jude insisted that more would be merrier. Once returned to bachelorhood, Ramsey let slip enough details about his marriage for Irina to reconstruct: after a couple of years, they could not carry a conversation for longer than five minutes.

The post birthday world, . 6. The Post-Birthday World, . The snapshot unerringly duplicated his appearance at her doorstep on his forty-seventh birthday-once again, leaning but perfectly straight, Ramsey himself resembled a cue stick set against the car-except that when he retrieved her for sushi that summer those cool, contemplative inhalations had been mesmerizing, while just now the same tableau made her want to throw up. 1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60. Okay, one small house, Lawrence conceded. It makes more sense to conserve body heat with a sweater than to warm your entire environment. Nip in air keep you awake, make you keep moving! As if to demonstrate, Raisa was rushing about the kitchen, creating a remarkable to and fro with the storage of a single clean spoon. Damn right, he agreed.

The Post-Birthday World is a novel by Lionel Shriver published in 2007, some four years after her previous novel, the award-winning We Need to Talk About Kevin.

Lionel Shriver's novels include the New York Times bestseller The Post-Birthday World and the international bestseller We Need to Talk About Kevin, which won the 2005 Orange Prize and has now sold over a million copies worldwide. Earlier books include Double Fault, A Perfectly Good Family, and Checker and the Derailleurs.

Shriver’s latest book, The Post-Birthday World, is not so explosive. There are no mothers who hate their adolescent children, for instance, and no Columbine-style massacres in school gyms

Shriver’s latest book, The Post-Birthday World, is not so explosive. There are no mothers who hate their adolescent children, for instance, and no Columbine-style massacres in school gyms. But in its forensic examination of the day-to-day boredoms, fears, annoyances, hopes and betrayals of romantic relationships, and its exploration of the roads not taken, it is in its way every bit as provocative.

The Post-Birthday World book. In this eagerly awaited new novel, Lionel Shriver, the Orange Prize-winning author of the international bestseller We Need to Talk About Kevin, delivers an imaginative and entertaining look at the implications, large and small, of whom we choose to love.

The Post-Birthday World has been called one of the best books about love ever written, but this superlative accolade almost does an injustice to the textured layers of irony Shriver achieves in this early 21st century love.

The Post-Birthday World has been called one of the best books about love ever written, but this superlative accolade almost does an injustice to the textured layers of irony Shriver achieves in this early 21st century love triangle that revolves around Irina McGovern, a Russian American beauty who illustrates children's books while living in London with her partner, Lawrence Trainer . Lawrence develops a fan's passion for snooker, a British sport which has a biological relation to pool, and thus befriends Ramsey Acton, one of Britain's top players, but from there, this novel's relationship to the classic comedy of manners comes to an end.

In this eagerly awaited new novel, Lionel Shriver, the Orange Prize-winning author of the international .

In this eagerly awaited new novel, Lionel Shriver, the Orange Prize-winning author of the international bestseller We Need to Talk About Kevin, delivers an imaginative and entertaining look at the implications, large and small, of whom we choose to love

American children's book illustrator Irina McGovern enjoys a secure, settled life in London with her smart, loyal, disciplined partner, Lawrence until the night she finds herself inexplicably drawn to kissing another man, a passionate, extravagant, top-ranked snooker player.


Vareyma
Because I read Kindle books I can't read the jacket copy, and because I don't usually read reviews I don't spoil a book. I guess I was the only one who read this cold and was completely at sea. I read it because I love Lionel Shriver's writing, and I kept reading even through I was thoroughly confused. One minute she would be married to Ramsey and the next chapter she was cosily sitting on the couch eating popcorn with Lawrence watching Ramsey play snooker. One chapter she won a prestigious prize for children's literature, then in another chapter she lost to her rival. I finished the book because it was written by Lionel Shriver, but I never understood it.

Then I went to Goodreads to read the other reviews posted and found out that seemingly everyone but me had advance notice that the book was an alternative universe with Irina kissing/not kissing Ramsey on his birthday, the pivotal event in her life.

I feel a book should stand on its own, and there is an indication of what it is contained in the book that Irina writes that wins/doesn't win the children's prize. Unfortunately it came too late to rescue the book for me.
Quamar
The Post-Birthday World has been called one of the best books about love ever written, but this superlative accolade almost does an injustice to the textured layers of irony Shriver achieves in this early 21st century love triangle that revolves around Irina McGovern, a Russian American beauty who illustrates children's books while living in London with her partner, Lawrence Trainer, a policy wonk whose American origins little signfy the professional success he achieves. Lawrence develops a fan's passion for snooker, a British sport which has a biological relation to pool, and thus befriends Ramsey Acton, one of Britain's top players, but from there, this novel's relationship to the classic comedy of manners comes to an end.

Aside from the first and twelfth chapters, the twelfth concluding the narrative, Irina's point of view bifurcates into two alternate worlds which are informed by the choice she makes, the first choice causing her to act, and the second to abstain after an eventful birthday dinner. Sophisticated readers know all about alternate endings in contemporary literary fiction, but Shriver achieves much more than this as the two narrative strands feed into and inform upon each other and remarkably unify the entire text. Shriver's craft is so skillful and deft that my resistance to her characters surrendered and swallowed me in, such that even the most ardent rebel to modern middle class domestication cannot help but to have their preconceptions challenged by a master story teller as Shriver has without a doubt proven herself to be. It is not much of a stretch to believe that one day her work will be taught along side Austen as a standard bearer of the literary arts.
Mr_Mix
Lionel Shriver is one of my favorite authors and her books are so well written that even the most mediocre story line, if written by her, is better than the best many authors can muster. While, in my opinion, this is not her best work, it's a great read. I found that I missed the characters when I'd reached the end and still had an appetite for more of the story. What amazed me most, and also frustrated me, was that Irina could be so passive. For a women blind sided by passion it seemed to take all the energy she could manage to succumb to it. She seemed so ill suited, or too lazy, for Ramsey and his snooker lifestyle that she never quite adapts so is always blind sided by him. She seemed much more suited to Lawrence and his stodginess. But even given that scenario she ends up boring him death. Still the author manages to portray Irina with her incredible lack of curiosity and perception without boring the reader. One of reasons I love Ms. Shriver's work so well is her ability to present her characters without criticizing. She guides us through their thought processes and leaves us to think and form our own opinion so reading her stories are a unique experience for each reader.
Thordira
I loved this book and still hated it at times. In the end, it left me thinking. What more can you ask? It's absolutely perfect for a book club - both for the reasons it's likeable and for those that it's not:

I loved the writing!: I've never read a Shriver book, so maybe unlike others I'm not disillusioned by comparison to others - but WOW, CAN SHE WRITE. Few authors could carry this ambitious concept off well.

I loved the univeral theme and concept: The passionate, temptuous roller-coaster ride of love or the relaxed, dependable love that's like an old, comfy sweater? Which is really best? Who in the end is the best choice? Both come with their ups and downs. What woman hasn't faced this?????

I loved the clever writing - particularly when the protaganist (and I don't think this is a spoiler) as a children's illustrator creates 2 different themed children's books that parallel the novel - WOW!

I loved that I still thought about and debated which was the best of her choice- long after the last page. Even though, deep inside, I wished SHriver had told me her answer.

I hated that both of the heroine's choices had terrible, abusive flaws. It would have been better, if she'd made both choices more likable. Though, in the end, I've decided she was illustrating that the "grass is always greener on the other side". Each choice is more likable when she's not with them.

And what I hated about it is also what makes it so great for endless pondering and discussion. What route should our heroine have chosen --- it's up to you. Fascinating reading!

Bottom Line: I think if you liked Sliding Doors or The Time Traveler's Wife, you'll really like this one!

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