ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » Nocturnes for the King of Naples
Nocturnes for the King of Naples e-book

Author:

Edmund White

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

ePub size:

1721 kb

Other formats:

lit doc rtf txt

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

Penguin Books; First Edition edition (February 28, 1980)

Pages:

148

ISBN:

0140053301

Nocturnes for the King of Naples e-book

by Edmund White


Affecting and elaborate, Nocturnes for the King of Naples laments the loss of great love

Affecting and elaborate, Nocturnes for the King of Naples laments the loss of great love. While styled as a love letter to a recently deceased ex, the novella recollects the high and low points of the narrator’s entire life, and it rarely recounts the time he actually spent with his former partner. Which windy & euphemistic pronouncement simply means that I came to Edmund White as a gay writer and finish my first encounter with him with a healthy respect for his dense, imagistic style, his powers of observation, and his ability to create a very convoluted narrative without [These notes were made in 1988

Edmund White's new novel is one of these.

Edmund White's new novel is one of these. he has embodied his story in some of the finest writing to be found in recent American fiction. -Doris Grumbach, Washington Post Book World. Nocturnes for the King of Naples is a baroque invention of quite startling brilliance and intensity. But about the prose style, at least, I need not have worried. Qhite is unquestionably the foremost American gay novelist. He did. When I asked Ed White what he regretted about his career, he did not mention this book.

Find sources: "Edmund White" – news · newspapers · books · scholar .

Find sources: "Edmund White" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (November 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). White in his home in New York, October 2007  . This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.

White, Edmund, 1940-. New York : Penguin Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

A hauntingly beautiful evocation of lost love, Nocturnes for the King of Naples has all the startling .

A hauntingly beautiful evocation of lost love, Nocturnes for the King of Naples has all the startling, almost embarrassing, intimacy of a stranger's love letters. The intense emotional situation envelops the readers from the first page; like all images in a dream, White's characters are the most real people we know, thought they remain phantoms.

2 people like this topic.

A hauntingly beautiful evocation of lost love, Noctunes for the King of Naples has all the startling, almost embarrassing, intimacy of a stranger's love letters.

Edmund White (author). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Author Edmund White was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on January 13, 1940. He majored in Chinese at the University of Michigan. Before spending a year in Rome, he worked for Time-Life Books from 1962 until 1970. He lived in France from 1983 until 1990. His works have chronicled gay life with such books as A Boy's Own Story, The Beautiful Room Is Empty, and The Farewell Symphony.

An intensely haunting and poetic evocation of lost love, comprised of chapters that are nocturnes set in different emotional keys but interconnected through subtle modulations, draws upon the worlds of religious mysticism, cafe society, homosexual love, and surrealism
Fearlesssinger
I must admit I picked up this book in error, attracted by its slim size and marvelous title, and confusing Edmund White with EB White, the great prose stylist. I did not notice that it was an imprint of Stonewall Inn Editions, exclusively devoted to gay literature, not my usual genre. But about the prose style, at least, I need not have worried. Though Edmund White is as lush as EB is spare, he is clearly also a master of words. For the opening nocturne, a nightscape of solitary men looking for partners amid the deserted sheds and silent cranes of some southern dockland, soars immediately above its sordid subject, without betraying it:

"A moment before the barge's beam invaded the cathedral we were isolated men at prayer, that man by the font (rainwater stagnant in the lid of a barrel), and this one in a side chapel (the damp vault), that pair of celebrants holding up a flame near the dome, those communicants telling beads or buttons pierced through denim, the greater number shuffling through, ignoring everything in their search for the god among us."

With such poetic writing, the gender of the characters is largely irrelevant. Each of the eight chapters is in a different key, a different color. One is a pastoral evocation of childhood, another a series of nights of make-believe in a sleeping theater, yet another a bizarre houseparty in Southern Spain out of Buñuel or Fellini. The common theme is loss: lament for a love too lightly abandoned, and the unconsoling postludes of other lovers. For White was writing in 1978, before AIDS altered gay lives for ever. But this is not the physical show-and-tell of Colm Toíbín or Alan Hollingsworth; what White anatomizes so exquisitely are the emotions.

There is little plot, though gradually some hints begin to emerge. The time is not modern; perhaps between the wars? The narrator is a young man of good family, his famous playboy father departed to hold court abroad, his mother ultimately unable to cope. The lost lover is famous also, older, richer, an artist of some sort; people recognize him in restaurants. Most characters are American, though much of the action takes place in European cities; I had thought Naples, or Rome, or Alexandria; I now think somewhere in Greece; perhaps all of these or none. My only serious problem (just enough to take off a star) is that while the individual chapters are brilliant, there is little through line binding them together, or determining why there should be eight rather than seven or nine. But oh, they are good!
Lesesshe
When I asked Ed White what his favorite output was I hoped that he would say "Nocturnes For The King Of Naples." He did. When I asked Ed White what he regretted about his career, he did not mention this book. It is short and easily readable in a single patient sitting: I read it on a flight from Boston to Salt Lake City that was ten hours from start to finish. I was mesmerized and I wept as I read: because these words meant so much to my own life, because I thought to myself that I would never have the godsend inspiration to produce a novel with so much self examination, so much poetry, so much questioning of God. Along with "The Little Prince" it is among my most favorite books.
Edmund White writes novels that tell of the world he lives in in New York and in Paris, and he has been heralded world wide for his talent. He advocates an unbridled sexuality. We have fought over this point and I love his writing despite his stance. Despite all his free love manifestos, he wrote a book that details that passion he felt for his past, for his past lovers and for his father. This is it and you wil never find a more engaging, moving tale of the search for love and affection.
Yar
An American, now living in Europe, creates an homage to his lover that he let slip away. He reviews his life, from childhood and his unstable upbringing to the self-made end of his perfect relationship and on through the aftermath of various lovers in whom all he can see are aspects of his one true love. through poetic use of language and masterful imagery, White has crafted a unique novel about what happens when you shut out the one person who means so much to you.

It's by no means an easy read, and I admit that I had to re-start after 20 pages because I was trying to zip through such a short novel. This novel deserves to be read slowly so that the words and images can make an impact on you, otherwise you will miss something.
Mejora
Put on some cool white linens, open an excellent bottle of red wine and lounge on your chez in the garden, or in your conservatory: This and 4 hours time are the ingredients you need to read or re-read this jewel of a novelette. Seldom has a book so resembled a piece of music, as this does. Clear your mind and let it in - this epic poem - this little night music. I have never stopped thanking Edmund White in my prayers for giving the world this piece of beauty. Enjoy!
Ausstan
I've read, studied, enjoyed and loved DH Lawrence, Jane Austen, Henry James, among others so I'm not illiterate but I was bored to sleep by this novel. Yes, I realize there isn't a plot, or character development, or structure for that matter. It's just a series of musings, ruminations, reflectons, obervances. But many of the metaphors and similes are forced and make no sense. It's must be great fun for the writer to conjure such words and ideas but not for the readers.

e-Books related to Nocturnes for the King of Naples