ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » Come Winter
Come Winter e-book

Author:

Evan Hunter

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Literary

ePub size:

1844 kb

Other formats:

mobi doc azw lrf

Rating:

4.6

Publisher:

Signet (March 5, 1974)

ISBN:

0451058267

Come Winter e-book

by Evan Hunter


Come Winter - Evan Hunter. I don’t believe we’ve met, Schwartz said. I’m Sandy, she said, and smiled over the top of her book.

Come Winter - Evan Hunter. Sandy was in the lead. Manny, he said, and shook hands with me, and then reached over to shake hands with David, and then tried to get to Sandy’s extended hand, but his leg wouldn’t permit it, so he just waggled the fingers in compromise, and she waggled her fingers back at him. Have you three been skiing long? Schwartz asked. Sandy’s been skiing since she was six, David said.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. Book by Hunter, Evan. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Evan Hunter (1926–2005) was one of the best-loved mystery novelists of. .

Evan Hunter (1926–2005) was one of the best-loved mystery novelists of the twentieth century. Both Last Summer and Come Winter were both written in the late 60's and early 70's, respectively (as was Last Summer, the movie), and, as a big Evan Hunter fan, I read (and watched) all 3 of them in real time-and never forgot any of them (especially the books). These books were considered to be rather shocking at the time of their publication because, even with the advent of the hippie and the "if it feels good, do it" era, it was still, at that time, pretty much a rule of thumb for all books and movies to end with a moral resolution.

An unforgettable exploration into the nature of evil, Come Winter is the chilling sequel to Last Summer and a brilliant. dazzling portrait of young sociopaths at play (Burlington Free Press). Thriller & Crime Fiction Psychological.

A glamorous ski resort becomes the setting for unspeakable evil in this chilling, fascinating novel by the New York Times–bestselling author of Last Summer (Los Angeles Times). An unforgettable exploration into the nature of evil, Come Winter is the chilling sequel to Last Summer and a brilliant. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Born Salvatore Albert Lombino, he legally adopted the name Evan Hunter in 1952

A glamorous ski resort becomes the setting for unspeakable evil in this. Born Salvatore Albert Lombino, he legally adopted the name Evan Hunter in 1952. While successful and well known as Evan Hunter, he was even better known as Ed McBain, a name he used for most of his crime fiction, beginning in 1956. Other books in the series. Last Summer (2 books). Books by Evan Hunter. Mor. rivia About Come Winter.

by. Hunter, Evan, 1926-2005. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by loader-DanaB on August 4, 2010.

Город: XiddaПодписчиков: 3 ты. себе: dreamer, idealist, epic fantasy writer. Repped by Erin Malone for Literary (ECMntertainment. com) & Eric Reid for Film/TV (ERntertainment.

Come Winter, 1973 BCE, by Evan Hunter. Hardcover with dust jacket, 218 pages, published by Doubleday & Company. Come Winter is the sequel to Hunter's earlier book, Last Summer. It follows much the same format, with many parallel occurrences. The locale has changed, from an island resort community to a ski lodge.

Book by Hunter, Evan
Bluddefender
I want to say that never has an upsetting book been this good. I'm surprised there aren't more reviews from readers. The story is about three young people: two young men, David and Peter, who, along with Sandy, the lady of the group, form an odd friendship. They have a mocking tone of discourse, and the language of a stranger (that is - a person NOT in their group of three) is parodied and batted-about with puns and plays on words--and so swiftly that the speaker has difficulty in following. Skiing is their prime interest; of course, all three are excellent. This story takes place at a ski lodge site where the group interacts with others but seems to enjoy showing their sense of superiority. And the dark side of this tale, often masked in clever repartee, is very dark indeed.

As I was reading about this odd trio, I thought to myself how well the author made them three dimensional and so real. I thought: "Wow, this author can really write." It is difficult to paint these three puzzling personalities so well, especially when one is the narrator. And then I realized that this is by Evan Hunter, a writer of solid repute, the author of "Blackboard Jungle," who died in 2005. He authored hundreds of books, by his own name and pseudonyms. Gifted and hard-working (to have completed so many books in his lifetime), he impressed me with this story; I immediately loaded another of his books upon finishing this one.

The story is hard to review, define, or explain. To understand it at all means to take a step into the "secret society" of the three main characters, and they are often no so nice. Although giving off the aura of sophistication, the dark nature of their true selves starts to slip through. We know that the rules they live by are their own rules; thus, they can justify their theft of a ski jacket with just a laugh. And often alluded to - but not totally explained - is the "rape" that happened 5 years ago in the past, which Peter insists was not really a rape.

While you start to hate these three, they encounter Mary Margaret, a truly evil and antagonistic person. The dynamics become stirred when Mary Margaret starts to exhibit her own brands of hatred and scorn.

This book just hypnotized me. After the entrance of Mary Margaret with her extreme and sickening anti-Semitism, are the gifted three all that bad, in comparison? But of course they are ...

Sometimes you may encounter people like these three-plus-one, clever but twisted minds, quick to seize an opportunity to ridicule, with their minds completely in the dark zone. They exist in reality -- that's one of the reasons, for me, that this book is so truly upsetting. But yet, so well written and so good. Five Stars.,
Ndyardin
A must-read for fans of Last Summer... assuming there are any left alive, of course. Another great sinister little yarn featuring the characters that I first met in the excellent, now hard-to-find movie version of the first book. If you want to see how things could possibly get any more disturbing for our dysfunctional trio, well, here you go. That said, if you don't know Evan Hunter's Last Summer, I'd start there first. Too bad they never managed a movie version of this one too; that cast was just perfect.
Hbr
Could not put this book down. New and covertly charging to the very end. Refreshing writing and I enjoyed it.
Folsa
I am Ed McBain fan and thought i would read his other books as well it was good but i prefer the 87th series much more. but this is good book.
Xanzay
I enjoyed this story of three very nihilistic young people. The three seem to be lacking in most human feelings except for what they feel for each other. Their winter trip to Colorado (Somewhere) strictly for their own amusement at first, begins to tumble down into who can do the most shocking thing first. But they don't want to commit murder, even though they probably want to see the Jewish doctor that adopts them die. It is not surprising frankly when he does die on the most challenging of slopes to be found in the resort area in which they are staying. I was saddened by the almost but not quite psychotic behaviors of the three. Their lack of social skills except with each other also saddened me.

I would not recommend this book to a young person under the age of 18. I do not believe the kind of social grouping these people engage in is acceptable in most of our society and I would not want to see young people try to emulate this group. The book frankly depressed me. But I give it four stars because it is well written and because the characters are fleshed out pretty well. I wonder at the anti-social attitudes of the characters and do not like them, any of them, very much. They seem like three "rich kids" run amok. Sad.
Mayno
Come Winter is the sequel to Hunter's earlier book, Last Summer. It follows much the same format, with many parallel occurrences. The locale has changed, from an island resort community to a ski lodge. The unit of three (David, Sandy and narrator Peter) return. Rhoda, the foil from the previous novel, appears only in a cameo when Sandy relates seeing her in a store as Rhoda plans to go to Paris. We aren't sure if Sandy is telling the truth, and that is what is striking about this later work. Last Summer was a very serious coming of age novel, an end of the innocence. Now that the innocence is gone, however, can we really trust the characters? Part of the story is told in the form of Peter's sessions with his psychotherapist, who is trying to convince him to leave his association with David and Sandy (the pop psych "co dependency" term had not been invented yet or it surely would have been used here). In these sessions, Peter repeatedly denies that they raped Rhoda in the previous work, and we aren't sure if he himself believes it or not. Rhoda's replacement in Come Winter is Mary Margaret, who is somewhat physically similar to Rhoda. Behaviorally, however, she is no Rhoda. In fact, she might even be a match for Sandy in callousness, bordering on sociopathy (if not crossing the line). Mary Margaret is portrayed as an anti-semite, and is not a character who draws sympathy from the reader, as Rhoda had. When the inevitable clash between Sandy and Mary Margaret comes to its climax, we see that little has changed from Last Summer. Peter and David and Sandy have grown older, and harder, and life simply goes on. Don't expect any moral epiphanies on the part of any of the main characters, which may be what Hunter was trying to tell us. Perhaps this is not the work that Last Summer was, but it is an engaging read nonetheless and a must for the many fans of Last Summer (and the excellent movie version).

e-Books related to Come Winter