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» » Slow Homecoming (New York Review Books Classics)
Slow Homecoming (New York Review Books Classics) e-book

Author:

Benjamin Kunkel,Peter Handke

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

History & Criticism

ePub size:

1237 kb

Other formats:

mbr lit azw doc

Rating:

4.7

Publisher:

NYRB Classics (March 31, 2009)

Pages:

296

ISBN:

1590173074

Slow Homecoming (New York Review Books Classics) e-book

by Benjamin Kunkel,Peter Handke


Additional Book Information.

Additional Book Information. Series: NYRB Classics ISBN: 9781590173077 Pages: 296 Publication Date: March 31, 2009. by Peter Handke, introduction by Benjamin Kunkel, translated from the German by Ralph Manheim. Fiction German Literature International Literature. An intense and utterly absorbing book. The Sunday Times (London).

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way)

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).

Peter Handke won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2019.

In addition to Slow Homecoming, NYRB Classics has also published Handke's novel Short Letter, Long Farewell. Peter Handke won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2019. Ralph Manheim (1907-1992) translated Günter Grass, Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Hermann Hesse, and Martin Heidegger, along with many other German and French authors.

Slow Homecoming book. Not so much postmodern as antediluvian' - Benjamin Kunkel. Slowly coming around to the idea of Handke as one of the great postwar European writers. Much like Repetition, this book is an uncompromising spiritual quest.

3. Nature’s taunting evasiveness is the conundrum at the heart of Peter Handke’s Slow Homecoming.

While thinking about these two titles I was lucky enough to attend a screening of Exit Through the Gift Shop, a feature-length film directed by stencil-art maverick Banksy. 3. The novel consists of three parts, a middle section in which Handke interjects a first-person rhapsody about his process bookended by third-person narratives of wandering and wondering.

Slow Homecoming, originally published in the late 1970s, is central to his achievement and to the powerful influence he has exercised on other writers, chief among them . A novel of self-questioning and self-discovery, Slow Homecoming is a singular odyssey, an escape from the distractions of the modern world and the unhappy consciousness, a voyage that is fraught and fearful but ultimately restorative, ending on an unexpected note of joy. The book begins in America.

Users who liked this book, also liked. The Goalie's Anxiety at the Penalty Kick (English).

In addition to Short Letter, Long Farewell, NYRB Classics has also published Handke’s novel Slow Homecoming and his memoir A Sorrow Beyond Dreams.

Peter Handke, introduction by Greil Marcus and Benjamin Kunkel. LRB Merchandise - Now Shipped Worldwide. The legendary LRB Mousemat is back!

Introduction by. Greil Marcus,Benjamin Kunkel. In addition to Slow Homecoming, NYRB Classics has also published Handke's novel Short Letter, Long Farewell and his memoir A Sorrow Beyond Dreams

Introduction by. Trade Paperback (US),Unsewn, Adhesive Bound. In addition to Slow Homecoming, NYRB Classics has also published Handke's novel Short Letter, Long Farewell and his memoir A Sorrow Beyond Dreams. Ralph Manheim (1907-1992) translated Gunter Grass, Louis-Ferdinand Celine, Hermann Hesse, and Martin Heidegger, along with many other German and French authors. Country of Publication.

Provocative, romantic, and restlessly exploratory, Peter Handke is one of the great writers of our time. Slow Homecoming, originally published in the late 1970s, is central to his achievement and to the powerful influence he has exercised on other writers, chief among them W.G. Sebald. A novel of self-questioning and self-discovery, Slow Homecoming is a singular odyssey, an escape from the distractions of the modern world and the unhappy consciousness, a voyage that is fraught and fearful but ultimately restorative, ending on an unexpected note of joy. The book begins in America. Writing with the jarring intensity of his early work, Handke introduces Valentin Sorger, a troubled geologist who has gone to Alaska to lose himself in his work, but now feels drawn back home: on his way to Europe he moves in ominous disorientation through the great cities of America. The second part of the book, “The Lesson of Mont Sainte-Victoire,” identifies Sorger as a projection of the author, who now writes directly about his own struggle to reconstitute himself and his art by undertaking a pilgrimage to the great mountain that Cézanne painted again and again. Finally, “Child Story” is a beautifully observed, deeply moving account of a new father—not so much Sorger or the author as a kind of Everyman—and his love for his growing daughter.
Zamo
good
Jogrnd
I stumbled across this book--novel?--at a used book store while on vacation. Incidentally, I had just finished watching the monumental documentary on WWII World at War; I had also recently been reading the early novels of the Romanian-Israeli Aharon Appelfeld. So, I was ready to take on the somberness of some postwar German fiction. I understand that the postwar attitudes and sensibilities of Americans and Continental Europeans are dramatically at odds with each other in many respects. However, while I appreciated encountering Handke for a view into the tortured consciousness of those Germanic peoples (Handke is Austrian) born during the war years, I found Slow Homecoming extremely frustrating.

The translation is certainly awkward in many places, using words that are far from contemporary colloquial English (even for 1985). Yet the author's style also keeps his readers at a distance--emotionally, dramatically--which results in an unpleasant, boredom-inducing muffling effect. This is especially a problem in the final section of the `novel,' which concerns the author's relationship to his young daughter.

While I find admirable the author's goal of evading the use of specific place names and personal names, in an attempt to look at the world with a fresh perspective--a strategy that every lover of modern poetry associates with Stevens and his Blue Guitar--the author has his narrator consistently fall into generalizations and clichés, whether he is in Alaska, California, New York, Germany, Austria or France. There are simply no dramatically defined individuals, fleshed out in all their idiosyncrasies and pathos. The author's concerns seem to be too self-centered despite the protagonist's supposed valuing of his daughter above all else.

However, Slow Homecoming is consistently an honest `portrait of the artist as a young man.' There are some interesting insights into the inspiration he received from Cézanne, explored in the second part of the book. Thirdly, the American reader will be exposed to the torment of a conscientious Austrian coming of age in a world where one's parents and parent-culture are completely unreliable, guilty of the worst of atrocities. Handke really seems like someone trying to figure out how to make life meaningful and worthwhile again. Finally, although dramatically null, the section of the book about the father-daughter relationship does offer some unique, personal insights into one of the most important bonds two people can have. It is honest, as harsh as it is affectionate. But again, I feel like I was kept at more than arm's length through a too-impersonal narration, an almost complete remove from dramatic action and dialogue--and of course awkward translation.

Overall, the book's insights are relatively fleeting or perhaps merely too overshadowed by the its greater faults. The naturalistic descriptions of central Alaska are actually very pretty--but again the book, perhaps purposefully, is too (deliberately?) fractured to make these positive aspects outweigh the frustrations of this reading experience.
Perhaps the worst aspect of the narrator is the self-aggrandizing and mystical obfuscation he seems inclined too. He speaks of feelings of transcendent unity or the onrush of cosmic visions without giving his readers the feel of what these (entirely mental) experiences are like. Late in the book, he writes, "Only in sorrow, over an omission or a commission (and then my eyes become magnetic and all-encompassing), does my life expand to epic proportions." This is almost laughably embarrassing. And nothing's "all-encompassing" simply because they say so. There are poets and novelists who I could believe that of--but they would never say, `Hey, look! I am actually omniscient!'

All that said, eventually, I might want to pick up a later Handke volume, to see if his early left-field experimentation matured into a less deliberate, less self-conscious achievement.
Beazerdred
I didn't really love or hate this book. The last section, "Child Story", about a father's relationship with his daughter was the best part.

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