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» » African Americans and the Culture of Pain (Cultural Frames, Framing Culture)
African Americans and the Culture of Pain (Cultural Frames, Framing Culture) e-book

Author:

Debra Walker King

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

History & Criticism

ePub size:

1945 kb

Other formats:

lrf mbr docx rtf

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

University of Virginia Press (March 4, 2008)

Pages:

224

ISBN:

0813926807

African Americans and the Culture of Pain (Cultural Frames, Framing Culture) e-book

by Debra Walker King


African Americans and th. .has been added to your Cart. This book examines pain as one of the lasting legacies of our racialized society

African Americans and th. This book examines pain as one of the lasting legacies of our racialized society. This is an important topic, and Debra Walker King, a respected scholar of African American literary and cultural studies, adds immensely to our understanding of pain in the African American experience. The book, elegantly written and critically sound, is a substantial contribution to African American literary and cultural studies.

Debra Walker King is Associate Professor of English at the University of Florida.

Start by marking African Americans and the Culture of Pain as Want to.

Start by marking African Americans and the Culture of Pain as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In this compelling new study, Debra Walker King considers fragments of experience recorded in oral histories and newspapers as well as those produced in twentieth-century novels, films, and television that reveal how the black body in pain functions as a rhetorical device and as political strategy.

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. December 13, 2019 History. found in the catalog Debra Walker King. Are you sure you want to remove African Americans and the Culture of Pain (Cultural Frames, Framing Culture) from your list? African Americans and the Culture of Pain (Cultural Frames, Framing Culture). by Debra Walker King. Published May 1, 2008 by University of Virginia Press.

The Cultural Frames, Framing Culture series examines both the way our culture frames our narratives and the way our narratives produce the culture that frames them.

In this compelling new study, Debra Walker King considers fragments of experience . Cultural Frames, Framing Culture (Hardcover).

In this compelling new study, Debra Walker King considers fragments of experience recorded in oral histories and newspapers as well as those produced in twentieth-century novels, films, and television that reveal how the black body in pain functions as a rhetorical device and as political strategy. Ultimately, the book investigates America's love-hate relationship with black bodies in pain.

Neutralizing Problematic Frames in the Culture Wars: Anti-Evolutionists Grapple with Religion

Neutralizing Problematic Frames in the Culture Wars: Anti-Evolutionists Grapple with Religion. Symbolic Interaction, Vol. 37, Issue. For a few good introductions to the debate that address Americans’ cultural values and religious claims from a sociological point of view, see DiMaggio, Paul, Evans, John . and Bryson, Bethany, Have Americans’ Social Attitudes Become More Polarized? American Journal of Sociology 102 (1996): 690–755 ; Hoffman, J. P. and Miller, A. Denominational Influences on Socially Divisive Issues: Polarization or Continuity?

African-American culture, also known as Black American culture, refers to the contributions of African Americans to the culture of the United States, either as part of or distinct from mainstream American culture.

African-American culture, also known as Black American culture, refers to the contributions of African Americans to the culture of the United States, either as part of or distinct from mainstream American culture. The distinct identity of African-American culture is rooted in the historical experience of the African-American people, including the Middle Passage. The culture is both distinct and enormously influential on American and global worldwide culture as a whole.

African-American culture is a term that refers to the culture of Americans of African descent in the United . Perry also underlines that African-American culture retained a number of African religious elements, both Muslim and traditional African beliefs

African-American culture is a term that refers to the culture of Americans of African descent in the United States. According to Sidney Mintz and Richard Price, the origin of African-American culture cannot be traced back to a particular geographical area or tribe in Africa as captives were shipped to the New World from different parts of the continent. Perry also underlines that African-American culture retained a number of African religious elements, both Muslim and traditional African beliefs. Although a major part of the slave population was converted to Christianity, the Muslim presence remained strong during the 19th and even the 20th century.

An innovative cultural study that connects visual theory to African American history, Humane Insight asserts the . I recommend this text highly. -Debra Walker King, author of African Americans and the Culture of Pain.

An innovative cultural study that connects visual theory to African American history, Humane Insight asserts the importance of ethics in our analysis of race and visual culture, and reveals how representations of pain can become the currency of black liberation from injustice. An innovative cultural study that connects visual theory to African American history, Humane Insight asserts the importance of ethics in our analysis of race and visual culture, and reveals how representations of pain can become the currency of black liberation from injustice.

In this compelling new study, Debra Walker King considers fragments of experience recorded in oral histories and newspapers as well as those produced in twentieth-century novels, films, and television that reveal how the black body in pain functions as a rhetorical device and as political strategy. King's primary hypothesis is that, in the United States, black experience of the body in pain is as much a construction of social, ethical, and economic politics as it is a physiological phenomenon.

As an essential element defining black experience in America, pain plays many roles. It is used to promote racial stereotypes, increase the sale of movies and other pop culture products, and encourage advocacy for various social causes. Pain is employed as a tool of resistance against racism, but it also functions as a sign of racism's insidious ability to exert power over and maintain control of those it claims--regardless of race. With these dichotomous uses of pain in mind, King considers and questions the effects of the manipulation of an unspoken but long-standing belief that pain, suffering, and the hope for freedom and communal subsistence will merge to uplift those who are oppressed, especially during periods of social and political upheaval. This belief has become a ritualized philosophy fueling the multiple constructions of black bodies in pain, a belief that has even come to function as an identity and community stabilizer.

In her attempt to interpret the constant manipulation and abuse of this philosophy, King explores the redemptive and visionary power of pain as perceived historically in black culture, the aesthetic value of black pain as presented in a variety of cultural artifacts, and the socioeconomic politics of suffering surrounding the experiences and representations of blacks in the United States. The book introduces the term Blackpain, defining it as a tool of national mythmaking and as a source of cultural and symbolic capital that normalizes individual suffering until the individual--the real person--disappears. Ultimately, the book investigates America's love-hate relationship with black bodies in pain.


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