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» » The Cambridge Companion to Dante (Cambridge Companions to Literature)
The Cambridge Companion to Dante (Cambridge Companions to Literature) e-book

Author:

Rachel Jacoff

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

History & Criticism

ePub size:

1244 kb

Other formats:

doc txt lrf mobi

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

Cambridge University Press; 2 edition (March 5, 2007)

Pages:

338

ISBN:

0521844304

The Cambridge Companion to Dante (Cambridge Companions to Literature) e-book

by Rachel Jacoff


Series: Cambridge Companions to Literature

Series: Cambridge Companions to Literature. Recommend to librarian. The Cambridge Companion to Dante. The volume was fully updated and includes three new essays on Dante's works.

The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Literature 1100-1500 (Cambridge Companions. Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, Sāo Paulo, Delhi. 71 MB·994 Downloads·New!. This Companion spans four full centuries to survey this most formative and turbulent era in the history. He's Not That Complicated™ PDF, eBook by Sabrina Alexis & Eric Charles. 55 MB·729 Downloads·New! adequately understood.

Collection: Cambridge Companions to Literature and Classics. Subjects: Literature, Area Studies, English Literature: General Interest, European Literature, European Studies. Series: Cambridge Companions to Literature. Fifteen specially commissioned essays by distinguished North American and European scholars provide background information and up-to-date critical perspectives on Dante's life and work, focusing on areas of central importance.

Book Description With such good resources as The Cambridge Companion to Dante by Rachel Jacoff an enjoyable and spiritually enriching experience is all but assured.

With such good resources as The Cambridge Companion to Dante by Rachel Jacoff an enjoyable and spiritually enriching experience is all but assured. 5 people found this helpful.

Cambridge Companions to Literature). Be the first to ask a question about The Cambridge Companion to Dante. Like most other Cambridge Companions it is a collection of scholarly essays written by various academics

Cambridge Companions to Literature). Lists with This Book. Further Reading Recommendations from "On Politics". The Cambridge Companions. Like most other Cambridge Companions it is a collection of scholarly essays written by various academics. It contains seventeen essays, and as is to be expected, the interest or quality of these varies somewhat. The average is not average, but is skewed towards greatness.

The Cambridge Companions to Literature and Classics form a book series published by Cambridge University Press. Each book is a collection of essays on the topic commissioned by the publisher. Topics Theatre History by David Wiles and Christine Dymkowski African American Theatre by Harvey Young Piers Plowman by Andrew Cole and Andrew Galloway. Cambridge Companions.

Cambridge University Press, 29 Nis 1993 - 270 sayfa . Fifteen ed essays by distinguished scholars provide background information and up-to-date critical perspectives on Dante's life and work, focusing on areas of central importance. The Cambridge Companion to Dante Cambridge Companions to Literature Cambridge collections online Cambridge companions to.

Cambridge Companions t. .

The Cambridge Companion to Old English Literature. The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Romance. The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Theatre. The Cambridge Companion to English Renaissance Drama. The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Humanism.

This 2007 second edition of The Cambridge Companion to Dante is designed to provide an accessible introduction to Dante for students, teachers and general readers. The volume was fully updated and includes three new essays on Dante's works. The suggestions for further reading now include secondary works and translations as well as online resources. The essays cover Dante's early works and their relation to the Commedia, his literary antecedents, both vernacular and classical, biblical and theological influences, the historical and political dimensions of Dante's works, and their reception. In addition there are introductory essays to each of the three canticles of the Commedia that analyse their themes and style. This edition will ensure that the Companion continues to be the most useful single volume for new generations of students of Dante.
tref
Wonderful background to Dante.
Vosho
A "Must Have" for reading and understanding Dante. I have read Dante twice before and this book greatly adds to my reading and depth of my understanding.
Bradeya
The endnotes don't link, but that isn't really an issue because they are at the end of each chapter and 90% of the time only give reference to other books. I know that is important, but not to the actual reading. I just bookmark the page as I get to it if it contains a book I want to reference. Or I highlight, add note ect. The book has a couple of format issues, but really small, gaps in strange places, line breaks out of place. But these are few and far between. It is a great collection of essays on the Divine Comedy that really increases the understanding of the readings. I highly recommend it. I don't have the paper copy, only the Kindle, and I am very glad to have it. It is in my top 5 favorite Amazon purchases.
Hystana
Perfect reference to scholarly articles concerning Dante and his work.
godlike
I'm just finishing my first reading of the Divine Comedy. Before tackling this daunting work I went to a good college library and checked out 5 books: The Burton Raffel translation; The Cambridge Companion to Dante (ed. by Rachel Jacoff - focus of this review); The Dante Encyclopedia edited by Richard Lansing; Images of the Journey in Dante's Divine Comedy by Taylor and Finley; and Understanding Dante by John Scott. All were very helpful and I switched back and forth as I read the Dante text. The Raffel text flows nicely and Dante explains his experiences well, but I would be sailing along in the story line then suddenly thinking, I have no idea what Dante is talking about here. The reference books and the Intro and Notes in the Raffel were an attention saver. Dante often launches into deep, detailed discussions without warning or explanation.

It was helpful to go to a great collection of artistic images to get pictures in my mind, so I could visualize what Dante was writing. I was sustained by the almost comic 15th C. picture of Beatrice literally shooting darts at Dante with her eyes, tipping him over with her glance of love, the power of her gaze. Taylor and Finley have organized their work in such a way that it is simple to go right to the part of the Commedia the reader is working on. The Dante Encyclopedia provided scholarly, helpful explanations of the meriad details Dante employs.

As to The Cambridge Companion to Dante, I found the articles by the editor/author especially helpful. She provides easy-to-understand discussions of the basic story and the MEANING AND POINT of what Dante is saying. There is an enormous amount of symbolism and the character, Beatrice, is the primary actor - everything leads to God through Beatrice. But it is easy to forget this because she does not actually appear in the text until the end of Purgatorio. Yet her role is continually referenced.

With such good resources as The Cambridge Companion to Dante by Rachel Jacoff an enjoyable and spiritually enriching experience is all but assured.
Punind
It is just and right that the greatest poem the world has known, the subject of which is a journey requiring able guides, would itself require able guides for profitable reading. "The Cambridge Companion to Dante" has several Virgils, a Beatrice (editor and contributor Rachel Jacoff), and a St. Bernard of Clairvaux (A. N. Williams.) Though these are obviously playful comparisons, it is undeniable that the contributors to this volume cover most of what is needed to better understand the Comedia. Rachel Jacoff's "Introduction to Paradiso", which provides much-needed insight for that most difficult canticle of the poem, and A.N. Williams' "The theology of the Comedy", which brings the reader 'home', beginning with his succinct opening sentence, "The Comedy is a poem of ends", are especially helpful.

Another reviewer states that the scholarship of this offering is somewhat dated; if by dated, he means that it has little of the current fashion in criticism, some of which has spiraled off into the outright bizarre and strange, then I would agree. This reviewer, however, found the essays and criticisms fresh, interesting, and very useful.

Rachel Jacoff's essay on the Paradiso was probably the most helpful of this collection. She gives detail and insights on each heavenly sphere so that the reader of the poem is able to follow the recurrent themes from the earlier canticles, as well as the images and symbolism distinct to the Paradiso. Jacoff does an excellent job in outlining the model and explaining that "the souls are not literally assigned to the spheres, but, as Beatrice explains, they 'show themselves' in the hierarchy of the spheres in order to... signify the nature and grade of their beatitude."

"The impossibility of directly rendering that reality", Jacoff continues, leads us to borrow St. Bonaventure's terminology: "shadows, echoes, and pictures... vestiges, images, and displays presented to us for the contuition of God", contuition being a term coined by Bonaventure to describe the knowing of one thing in the course of knowing a first object. Knowing the essence of a creature, for instance, is the occasion for understanding something about God.

Toward the end of the essay Jacoff has a discussion on why St. Bernard serves as Dante's final guide, and it involves the Blessed Virgnin Mary, which I think Catholics will find edifying.

I recommend this work for the Dante section of any bookshelf.
Windworker
This is an able commentary to Dante, but make sure you are clear on which edition you are purchasing: the most recent (as of this review) is a March 2007 version. Sufficient edits, insights and scholarly arguments (let's not quite call them developments) exist in the 14 years between publications to make it worth being certain what you're buying before you buy.

Then again - the 1993 edition is available used for under three bucks, while the 2007 edition ranges from $25 to $50. So... choose your priority.
This companion is an excellent guide to Dante's life, work, and thought. It is especially useful for those readers of the Comedy who want more information on specific allusions than most footnoted editions can supply. It is also helpful for an understanding of the complex political and religious turmoils in which Dante was embroiled, and which showed up continuously throughout his work.

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