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» » Night of Sorrows: A Novel
Night of Sorrows: A Novel e-book

Author:

Frances Sherwood

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Genre Fiction

ePub size:

1981 kb

Other formats:

txt lit lrf rtf

Rating:

4.1

Publisher:

W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (April 17, 2007)

Pages:

432

ISBN:

0393329747

Night of Sorrows: A Novel e-book

by Frances Sherwood


Night of Sorrows book.

Night of Sorrows book. Combining historical and fictional characters, Frances Sherwood's new novel is the story of a spectacular clash of traditions, imbued with her characteristic humor and bringing to life the colors, smells, and sounds of Mexico. Reading group guide included.

Night of Sorrows plunges readers into the conflicting New Worlds of the mysterious Malintzín, born as. .

Night of Sorrows plunges readers into the conflicting New Worlds of the mysterious Malintzín, born as an Aztec princess and sold as a slave, and her dashing and ruthless lover-master, conquistador Hernán Cortés. Frances Sherwood is a teacher in South Bend, Indiana, where she lives with her husband. Her works of fiction include Vindication, Night of Sorrows, and The Book of Splendor.

Night of Sorrows" plunges readers into the conflicting New Worlds of the mysterious Malintzin, born as an Aztec . I have just completed the fascinating exercise of reading Night of Sorrows by Frances Sherwood and Malinche by Laura Esquivel back to back.

Night of Sorrows" plunges readers into the conflicting New Worlds of the mysterious Malintzin, born as an Aztec princess and sold as a slave, and her dashing and ruthless lover-master, conquistador Hernan Cortes.

Sold as a love slave to Hernan Cortes in the early sixteenth century, Aztec princess Malintzín accompanies him on a journey to Tenochtítlan, while Cortés and his compadres engage in a battle that marks the end of the Aztec empire.

Frances Sherwood (born June 4, 1940) is an American writer, novelist, and educator. Sherwood has published four novels and one book of short stories. Her 1992 novel, Vindication, was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Born June 4, 1940, in Washington, DC, and raised in Monterey, California, Sherwood is the daughter of William and Barbara Sherwood. She is married to photographer Fred Slaski.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. an exuberant ride through a heady and experimental time. Harper's Bazaar In this electrifying novel. Night of Sorrows: A Novel - eBook.

New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. Fine in Near Fine DJ. DJ rear panel bottom edges has slight wear. A novel set in the twilight of the 16th-century Aztec empire ISBN: 0393058255. Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). Ono, Dana R, Williams, James D, and Wagner, Anne. Vanishing Fishes Of North America.

Night of Sorrows: A Novel. Learn More at LibraryThing. ISBN 9780393329742 (978-0-393-32974-2) Softcover, W. Norton & Company, 2007.

A tale of love and conquest, "full of page-turning situations...worthy of a García Lorca drama" (San Francisco Chronicle).

A historical novel about the conquistador Cortés and the Aztec princess Malintzín, by a "stunning" (New York Times Book Review) writer. Night of Sorrows plunges readers into the conflicting New Worlds of the mysterious Malintzín, born as an Aztec princess and sold as a slave, and her dashing and ruthless lover-master, conquistador Hernán Cortés. As they march through the Empire of the Sun to the shimmering island metropolis, Tenochtítlan (Mexico City), Cortés advances his cause by winning friends through Machiavellian conniving and confronting enemies in merciless battle. We witness the volatile dynamics and multifarious intrigues of the commander and his temperamental compadres, and weather the heartbreaking inner odyssey of Malintzín. Set at the twilight of the Aztec empire―April 1519 through the night of sorrows, la noche triste, June 30, 1520―Night of Sorrows explores the nature of slavery and imperialism, prostitution, friendship, feminine identity, and the macho ideal. Combining historical and fictional characters, Frances Sherwood's new novel is the story of a spectacular clash of traditions, imbued with her characteristic humor and bringing to life the colors, smells, and sounds of Mexico. Reading group guide included.
Zicelik
This is a boring and ridiculous treatment of a subject that deserves better. I realize any writer of historical fiction deserves leeway in how the facts and personalities of his story are presented, but here I think Ms. Sherwood takes that concession too far. At least she avoids the legend that Cortes "burned" his ships. Really he beached them, but otherwise her description of that incident is a poor embellishment to a good story that could stand on its own. Also, no Spaniard in 1519 would ever have referred to New Spain as "America." Sherwood's editors should've caught that. And the Hernan Cortes Sherwood has created here is a mincing, vanglorious fop. No such man, who at one point Sherwood has dancing around his room singing that he is a "god," could ever have controlled the desperadoes he took to Mexico, much less subdued an empire as powerful as the Aztec or the Spanish expedition sent against him from Cuba. No matter what we may think of Cortes's ruthless treatment of Mexico's native peoples, he was one of the most competent commanders in history and his men, far from the bumbling fools shown here, displayed a degree of courage and endurance seldom matched in history. However, Sherwood's portrayal of Malinche, or Dona Marina, Cortes's native translator, interpreter, mistress, is compelling. In Sherwood's treatment Malinche emerges as a sympathetic figure. Her value to Cortes cannot be exaggerated and she rightly deserves the title of the most important native American woman in history. Sherwood handles her well & offsets somewhat the undeservedly bad press this woman has gotten in some quarters. I think this unbalanced approach to the towering figures of Cortes and Malinche is due to the fact that Sherwood is a writer who has no understanding of men of action. Her treatment of Bernal Diaz del Castillo, for instance, seems totally off the mark. Here he appears as Cortez's lapdog clerk. But read Diaz yourself if you would appreciate the views of an eye witness to the Conquest and its personalities; he knew them all. Or return to that classic of William Prescott's or even Cortes's letters to Chas. V. But forget NIGHT OF SORROWS, it is not worth your time or your money.
Haracetys
All the blood, guts, and gore of the Aztec conquest by the Spanish. It's debatable who were the most blood thirsty. The book looks at the story from a young Mexica woman's view who could speak the languages of both. Sherwood is to be commended for making the story as close to Cortez' chronicler Bernal Diaz and his first hand recordings as possible. Enjoyed the read!
Fek
F. Sherwood has done it again. She is a master at the details, the sensory, the science, the history of total feeling.
As always, her characters penetrate my psyche - Great stuff.
Bumand
I've always been curious about this piece of history but resisted diving into the history books to learn about it. This novel gave me the chance to "go there." Seeing the beginning of the conquest of the Aztec Empire through the eyes of a native female was fascinating. From the start, the story pulled me in and made we want to keep going. From the opportunistic, brave and flawed Cortez to the evil Isla, from the Aztec princess Malintzin to the sensitive monk, Brother Francisco, the characters made a living tapestry of all aspects of being human, and inhuman. Sixteenth century Mexico came to life on the pages of this book. The nature of slavery and imperialism are explored and laid bare. But it's also a love story and an adventure story that is portrayed in a believable fashion, with no gauzy overlay. The 425 pages flew by. I highly recommend this book to readers who enjoy history, romance, adventure, cultural studies or character study.
Loni
Hernan Cortez arrives with a fleet of ships, prepared to march to the heart of the Empire of the Sun in 1519, making his way to the famed Tenochtitlan and the legendary Monteczuma. The conquest recorded by history is expanded by Sherwood's novel, at the center of the novel an Aztec princess, Malintzin, who is sold into slavery by her mother; as a slave, Malintzin comes to the attention of Cortez, who early realizes the advantage of her language skills in accomplishing his task. With Malintzin as an integral part of Cortez' plan, embarks upon a forced march to the interior built on assumption rather than fact, including race, imperialist ideals and the role of women in society. The barbaric newcomers are horrifying to the native peoples, the Aztecs and Mayans, the invaders' hygiene repugnant and their religious beliefs insensible. But Malintzin is a survivor and once she becomes attached to the strange Spaniard, her fate is inextricable from his.

In the end, Spain is conquered, but those first fitful battles reveal the transitory nature of such an adventure. Cortez learns along the way, making horrendous mistakes at the cost of many lives, but his warlike acuity serves him well, an almost instinctive reaction to danger that eventually accomplishes the inevitable, given the imbalance of resources. The Spanish arrive fully armed, the natives unable to match their firepower and incendiary devices. Most striking, however, are Cortez' Machiavellian machinations, pitting one group against another in service of his ultimate goal. He tests his men at every turn, with the instincts and courage of a natural leader, certainly appreciating that Malintzin is a precious asset, her translating skills critical to the venture. In this great culture clash, the bloodthirsty ancient gods of Tenochtitlan and the Christian God imposed by the Spanish, the cities are filled with carnage enough to appease any sacrificial requirements.

It is the weight of civilization that turns the tide, the rule of Monteczuma toppled by attrition, smallpox accomplishing what could not be managed by military action, over half the Aztecs destroyed by the disease, drought and famine decimating the rest of the inhabitants of the city. Like a cancer, once Cortez' troops infiltrate the civilized, if bloody, culture, the old infected by the new. The Night of Sorrows, June 30, 1520, signals a temporary defeat, but the continent will eventually be overrun. With trenchant observations, Sherwood illustrates the arbitrary nature of war, the fractious humanity that accompanies Cortez' endeavors and the many mistakes that mar his passage into legend. Surely, Malintzin is critical to his success at every turn, her translations paving the way for an intrusion into the deepest riches and resources of the continent, her love for this inconstant man the cement that binds his dream to reality. Luan Gaines/ 2006.

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