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» » The Book of Samson
The Book of Samson e-book

Author:

David Maine

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Genre Fiction

ePub size:

1751 kb

Other formats:

azw lrf doc docx

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

Thorndike Pr (February 1, 2007)

Pages:

329

ISBN:

0786292857

The Book of Samson e-book

by David Maine


view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. This book is chock-a-block full of error and ignorance about the life and times of the people living in the Ancient Near East.

The Book of Samson book. In The Book of Samson, David Maine has created an unforgettable portrait, a unique and astonishing masterpiece that puts a face on a previously faceless icon.

Электронная книга "The Book of Samson: A Novel", David Maine. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Book of Samson: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

In The Book of Samson, David Maine has created an unforgettable portrait, a unique and astonishing masterpiece that puts a face on a previously faceless icon. Always have a good book lined up - Listen and read whenever you want

The Book of Samson introduces its narrator as a world-weary Israelite with a strong sense of history. Samson tells of how his mother was visited by an angel and told that she would bear a son. My mother said-Mm-hm, he says

The Book of Samson introduces its narrator as a world-weary Israelite with a strong sense of history. Samson is well aware that his people had chosen to turn their backs on the One True God and had fallen into immoral and idolatrous ways, which is something they seem to do with numbing regularity. My mother said-Mm-hm, he says. Then she related the story of the angel to Samson’s father, whose reply was a similarly dubious Uh huh. But the child came along. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. This is the story of my life and it’s not a happy one. If you wish to read about me you’re welcome to but if you’re looking for something to give you hope & joy comfort & inspiration then you had best leave off here straightaway and go find something else. My life has an abundance of frustration and pain plus a fair bit of sex and lots of killing and broken bones but it’s got precious little hope & joy comfort & inspiration.

In The Book of Samson, David Maine has created an unforgettable portrait of a man who believes he is touched by the hand of God--then instructed by that God to slaughter his enemies

In The Book of Samson, David Maine has created an unforgettable portrait of a man who believes he is touched by the hand of God--then instructed by that God to slaughter his enemies. If you wish to read about me you’re welcome to but if you’re looking for something to give you hope & joy comfort & inspiration then you had best leave off here straightaway and go find something else


Tygrafym
I discovered David Maine only a few short months ago, and have devoured all three of his novels in that time. I absolutely love his works, and will eagerly await his next novel.

Samson is a fascinating character, complex and real. The story fast paced and interesting.

Maine uses humor and humanity in all his books, and as a result takes these familiar scenes and implants them in our minds in a whole new way.
His playfulness with language is wonderful, though at times I found the odd punctuation distracting.
Levion
Love how this author takes biblical storied and weaves such backgrounds in to these people that we've heard for so long. My Favorite was about Cain
Jugore
I read the review by Beniot before purchasing this book thinking maybe he had a bone to pick with the author . . . but he was absolutely correct in his assessment.

I could not even get through the first chapter when he writes about the birth of Samson. Immediatly, before the umbilical cord is even severed, he, the newborn baby Samson, disintergrates a rock in his bare hands! The author doesn't even attempt to explain where the rock came from.

This is a totally worthless book! St. Martin's Press, the publisher, should be ashamed to have published this story.
Unde
I'm not sure where to begin in describing how badly written this book is. One might start with the hackneyed writing of David Maine, who evidently is incapable of punctuating his sentences. The absolute lack of commas, quotation marks, and so forth makes it difficult to comprehend what little meaning he has to offer.

But the bigger issue is the fact that Maine has done absolutely no research whatsoever. In fact, I'm not at all sure that he even bothered to read the account of Samson in the book of Judges in the Old Testament. This book is chock-a-block full of error and ignorance about the life and times of the people living in the Ancient Near East.

The author has the journey from Samson's home to the city of Timnath take three days--when the two are only about 2 miles apart! The trip from the Sorek Valley to Gaza takes two entire weeks! Two weeks to travel less than 50 miles! The Israelites busy themselves building silos for their grain, silos dug deep into the rocky soil of Zorah (Samson's hometown, which Maine also doesn't know)--dug into the soil and lined with bricks, which the Israelites did not use to build in that region! The temple in Gaza, where Samson dies, is as big as Grand Central Station, made of granite with gigantic pillars modeled after the Coliseum. Several Philistine temples have been excavated, and they look nothing whatsoever like Maine's absurd images.

The author is evidently not aware that Samson's eyes were gouged out after he was captured, or that the Philistines set him to grinding corn in a prison. He has Samson carried atop a camel after he's captured, when camels were reserved for the wealthy as a sign of prestige. He even dresses Delilah in pants!

He has Samson's father taking pottery to sell to the Philistines, when a quick search on the internet will reveal to even a casual student that the Philistines were world-renowned for the high-quality pottery which they produced. This would be like selling ice cubes to the Eskimos.

I could go on and on with the errors contained in Maine's faulty picture of life in Samson's day. The major problem with this novel is that it adds nothing of value whatsoever to the Biblical account of Samson. One will learn a great deal more about Samson and life in ancient times simply by reading the book of Judges.
Fearlessrunner
I have read all of David Maines books. They are all great! I love reading about biblical charaters and stories , wether they are heartfelt books about the bible or wether they are just fun to read books that make me laugh. Well, this is one of the fun to read and make you laugh type books. Very fast reading, very unique writing style, and his own twist on Samson and Delilah. You have to remember while reading books like this, that they are FICTION and you can't read it and get upset because he puts his own twist on it. You have to read and just enjoy his storytelling which is amazing.
Getaianne
After the brilliance of "The Preservationist," I was mildly disappointed with David Maine's follow-up, "Fallen." Both books succeeded in making ancient stories breathe with vitality and even a certain modern sensibility, but "Fallen" felt less fresh, more forced. So I opened up "The Book of Samson" wondering what to expect?

This third tale in Maine's biblical repertoire is everything I hoped. And more. Not only does the story of Samson and Delilah (spelled Dalila, in the book) come alive, it reads like a thriller. Racing from scenes of Samson's momentous birth to his in a Dagon temple, this book gives new insight into a well-worn tale. It answers questions of logic, it explores questions of faith, and it leaves open-ended its interpretation of these issues as they relate to modern conflicts between Palestinians and Jews. Perhaps the most impressive element is Maine's ability to give Samson his own voice, a distinctly different one from that in Maine's previous books. When he utters his final sentence in the wonderfully rendered finale, you believe his every word.

With this glittering, yet gritty, example of characterization and narrative, David Maine vaults high up my list of authors to follow with fervor in the coming years. He writes with reverence for his source material, while never thinking too highly of his subjects--men and women, just like me or you. They sweat, they curse, they occasionally do great things.

"The Book of Samson" ranks easily in my Top Five for 2006.
Joni_Dep
I read this book without ever hearing anything about the author or the book so I was totally in the dark, having only the book jacket to clue me in. I was pleasantly surprised and laughed through the entire (short) book. The story is not biblically and maybe not historically accurate but Maine never claims it to be. It is irreverant and sometimes graphic, but never disrespectful. Some conservative Christians may take issue with Maine's take on the story of Samson, but this one found it endearing, entertaining, and hilarious. I'm now reading The Preservationist.

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