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» » Official Privilege
Official Privilege e-book

Author:

P. T. Deutermann

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Genre Fiction

ePub size:

1469 kb

Other formats:

rtf lrf lrf mbr

Rating:

4.1

Publisher:

Signet Books; New Ed edition (1997)

Pages:

640

ISBN:

0451189094

Official Privilege e-book

by P. T. Deutermann


Deutermann (Official Privilege, St. Martin's, 1995) has written a fine page-turner for popular collections .

Deutermann (Official Privilege, St. Marylaine Block, St. Ambrose Univ. while doing some divorce work.

Official Privilege begins with a mystery: in the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, the mummified body of a black Navy . P. T. Deutermann spent twenty-six years in government service before retiring to begin his writing career

Official Privilege begins with a mystery: in the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, the mummified body of a black Navy lieutenant is found bolted inside the boiler of a deactivated battleship. While the cause of death is clear, the officer's identity is not. With nerve ends raw from the media focus on recent scandals, the Pentagon bypasses its own investigative service and appoints a commander, Dan Collins, and a civilian, Grace Snow, to conduct an inquiry. Deutermann spent twenty-six years in government service before retiring to begin his writing career. He is the author of nine previous novels and lives with his wife in North Carolina.

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Official Privilege by P T Deutermann - book cover, description, publication history. Official Privilege begins with a mystery: in the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, the mummified body of a black Navy lieutenant is found bolted inside the boiler of a deactivated battleship. Together they resolve to ignore the Navy's political sensitivities and conduct a by-the-book murder investigation.

In a thriller about murder, politics, and the Pentagon, by the best-selling author of The Edge of Honor, the Naval Investigative Service hires two outsiders to solve the murder of a lieutenant, and they find evidence implicating a senator. 50,000 first printing.

by. Deutermann, Peter . 1941-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Official Privilege book. Official Privilege begins with a mystery: in the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, the mummified body of a black Navy lieutenant is found bolted inside the boiler of a deactivated battleship

Official Privilege book.

It's not that his writing is brilliant, or his prose engrossing, or his insight extraordinary; it's just that he can tell a good yarn and keep it moving.

Deutermann (born December 27, 1941) is an American writer of mystery, police procedural and thriller novels. Deutermann served in the United States Navy for 26 years, earning 19 medals and decorations and retiring with the rank of captain. He served as the commander of the USS Tattnall between 1981 and 1983. He also served on the USS Morton, USS Hull, USS Jouett and USS Charles F. Adams, while also serving in both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets.

ISBN 10: 0451189094 ISBN 13: 9780451189097. Publisher: Signet Books, 1997.


Whilingudw
This is a pretty good novel by author P.T. Deutermann, who is an author whose work I generally like. Deutermann's best work by far are his novels that deal with the US Navy and particularly US Navy politics. This novel is full of this kind of intrigue, and thus, as usual, Deutermann delivers a fascinating and gripping novel that kept me clicking my Kindle to the very end.

There is a low-key romance here that could have been developed better. This centers on the well-worn theme of a handsome, likable, single guy being assigned to team up with a beautiful, rich, intelligent, single woman. (Why did this never happen to me when I was in the service?). The romance just sort of meanders along.

The Naval politics here are absolutely fascinating, and it is here where Deutermann really shines. Deutermann really knows his stuff on this topic, as well he might being a retired US Navy Captain. Some short guy or other must have been responsible for Deutermann not making Admiral. You will see in almost all of his novels that Deutermann has it in for anyone who is much under 5'10". You know this because Deutermann is really hung up on height, and he painstakingly describes the height of all of his characters, and invariably the short guys are referred to as "diminutive" (which translates to "inferior" the way Deutermann uses the term) and these same short guys are invariably venal, petty, and suffering from what Deutermann invariably describes as "short man's disease." Guess Deutermann is still angry about not making Admiral.

This is a pretty good novel by one of my favorite authors. RJB.
Malak
P.T. Deutermann is turning into one of my favorite authors. It's not that his writing is brilliant, or his prose engrossing, or his insight extraordinary; it's just that he can tell a good yarn and keep it moving. That, and the fact that he must be an unending researcher, as his sense of place and times always rings true. I used to think the same of Ken Follett, until recently. Deuterman is at his best when he is delving into the underside of a beaucracy, in this case the Navy, an institution he clearly knows well. I've read a number of his books and no one can show the pettiness of a beaurocrat like he can. His plots are often formulaic, straightforward villains, heroic if flawed heros, and a little bit of sex; but the pacing and plot twists keep you glued to the page. Official Priviledge is excellent. Well worth the read. This is light fiction; don't expect great insight, just a fun time. You could throw a rock at Deutermann's books and hit one that would make a good movie. This one is no exception.
Blackredeemer
This book has an unusual plot, that keeps the reader guessing until the very end. To me, the revelation of the final culprit was a total surprise, but that's what makes good mysteries enjoyable. However, what was not enjoyable was the numerous and continuing typos. Also, the story was awash in acronyms and special usage words that only slow down and confuse the reader. Another annoying feature was the excessive detail in describing the streets that characters would follow as they traveled around. Unless you lived in the town or area described, this is useless information. Throwing light on the protectionism involved in the senior Naval officer's promotion system is something that should be corrected in DOD, but most likely never will.
Dawncrusher
Details do indeed make this story a joy to read, you can imagine almost every scene in your mind from the descriptions given and you feel the emotions of the characters written out as plain as day. There's heart, brains, little humor here and there with a romance that is believable rather than unlikely which is sometimes an issue with this author. The attention to procedures also puts you straight in the driver's seat. For a nice change, it paints a far more realistic picture of the US Navy than we are accustomed to seeing which is US military = good guys, everyone else = bad guys which is a tired overused formula. The author takes the time to show you that there are always shades of gray rather than black and white.
allegro
Deutermann is one of my favorite authors. Yet this read was a disappointing experience. To know precisely why, you'd have to read how this kind of novel ought to be done as by, for instance, the way author Brian Haig does it. PTD's effort is bogged down by endless minutiae of Naval political infighting. The novel needed a good editor IMHO. The story idea is a good one but the author overwrites. There is little suspense and the reader can become easily confused by underdeveloped characters in the Navy's chain of command.
Hiclerlsi
As usual Deutermann provides the gripping and fast moving story that we have come to expect. Deutermann and Cussler are in the same league and few others are members. His views and description of the way the system really works are a guidepost and his characters are real world and believable. I read few authors based on their name alone and he is one of them.
Alsantrius
Another intense Navy/ NIS thriller. A lot capital letters signifying different federal departments as well as the politics of climbing the ladder of insignia stars made it a book hard to put down as well as a challenge to remember what each abbreviation meant. I loved it as well as the author's previous novels I've read.
An enjoyable read with a bit of a surprise at the end.

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