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» » Free Land
Free Land e-book

Author:

Rose Wilder Lane

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Genre Fiction

ePub size:

1282 kb

Other formats:

mobi doc lrf mbr

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

Bison Books; Reprint edition (October 1, 1984)

Pages:

332

ISBN:

0803279140

Free Land e-book

by Rose Wilder Lane


Rose Wilder Lane (December 5, 1886 – October 30, 1968) was an American journalist, travel writer, novelist, political theorist and daughter of American writer Laura Ingalls Wilder.

Rose Wilder Lane (December 5, 1886 – October 30, 1968) was an American journalist, travel writer, novelist, political theorist and daughter of American writer Laura Ingalls Wilder. Along with two other female writers, Ayn Rand and Isabel Paterson, Lane is noted as one of the founders of the American libertarian movement. Lane was the first child of Laura Ingalls Wilder and Almanzo Wilder and the only child of her parents to survive into adulthood.

The longest lives are short, it is our work that lasts longer. Herbert Hoover Presidential Library - Laura Ingalls Wilder Project. In 1922, Rose Wilder Lane accepted an assignment with the Near East Relief (NER), taking her. to Armenia with friend and photographer Peggy Marquis. Rose wrote a note to her grandmother (Caroline Ingalls) in South Dakota, Mother says that you were worried about my being in Constantinople when the Near East situation blew up.

Rose Wilder Lane tells of their struggle to survive with such force that Free Land has become a classic. Rose Wilder Lane: Her Story. by Rose Wilder Lane · Roger Lea MacBride. For everyone who loves the Little House books-a reissue of a charming collection of early stories and reminiscences by Laura Ingalls Wilder, along with essays and writings from her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane, who was an award-winning writer. The Discovery of Freedom: Man's Struggle Against Authority.

Rose Wilder Lane tells of their struggle to survive with such force that Free Land has become a classic frontier novel. The young couple experience cyclones, droughts, and blizzards that isolate them for days in their sod sh In the 1880s, when adventure lay in the conquest of the prairies, David Beaton and his bride came to Dakota to claim three hundred acres of grassland. Rose Wilder Lane tells of their struggle to survive with such force that Free Land has become a classic frontier novel.

Catalogue Number: 9780803279148. Missing Information?. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 2 brand new listings. General & Literary Fiction.

In the 1880s, when adventure lay in the conquest of the prairies, David Beaton and his bride came to Dakota to claim three hundred acres of grassland. In the 1880s, when adventure lay in the conquest of the prairies, David Beaton and his bride came to Dakota to claim three hundred acres of grassland. The young couple experience cyclones, droughts, and blizzards that isolate them for days in their sod shanty and endanger their livestock.

Pages displayed by permission of U of Nebraska Press.

In the 1880s, when adventure lay in the conquest of the prairies, David Beaton and his bride came to Dakota to claim three hundred acres of grassland. Rose Wilder Lane tells of their struggle to survive with such force that Free Land has become a classic frontier novel. The young couple experience cyclones, droughts, and blizzards that isolate them for days in their sod shanty and endanger their livestock. The simple pleasures of home cooking, horse trading, and socializing interrupt work, here described in its wealth of variety. In every detail, Free Land comes to life because Lane grew up in the time and place of which she writes. The book embodies her belief that "living is never easy, that all human history is a record of achievement in disaster, and that our great asset is the valor of the American spirit."

Like the Beatons of this novel, Rose Wilder Lane's parents homesteaded in Dakota. Lane was a successful novelist and journalist when, in the 1930s, she encouraged and helped her mother, Laura Ingalls Wilder, to write the Little House on the Prairie books that were later dramatized for television.


Nuliax
I've read the full body of Laura Ingalls Wilder's literature; the novels, short stories, and articles of her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane; the diaries and letters of Laura Ingalls Wilder published posthumously ("On the Way Home," "West from Home"); and a very broad range of biographies and articles presenting various perspectives on the complex relationship between both women.

"Free Land" is both crushing and uplifting at the same time, written in a style and voice far different than the one used in the "Little House" stories. Reading this book -- recounting the pioneering experiences of the fictional Beaton family, though clearly based upon the lives of Charles and Caroline, Almanzo and Laura -- one realizes how much LIW had to soften her material for her younger audience. The episodes and events in "Free Land" are presented in candid detail, leaving little doubt as to the harshness of the pioneer lifestyle and the unflinching tenacity of these men and women in trying to tame the land. Lane tells of unforgiving droughts, violent cyclones, 22-hour workdays, and blizzards so sudden and catastrophic that settlers -- even young children -- are either lost entirely or horribly maimed for life. It is not a book written for kids.

How sobering to realize what the people of the 1880's endured; and what a tribute to both LIW and RWL that they devoted themselves to commemorating this now-lost era in writing. Lane's unwavering eye for detail makes us totally re-evaluate (and self-consciously laugh at) the 21st century idea of a "bad day." Even the title choice is a deliberate irony: yes, the pioneers were "free" and independent; yes, the Dakota land was nearly "given away" for the taking ... but the well-written passages of this book make the true price of that land painfully apparent. It's well worth a read.
Thordira
You will have a sense of familiarity with many scenes in this book...they were told to Rose by her Mother; who later wrote the Little House books. But they aren't the positive, childhood happy scenes - much more serious, far more real. For me, the contrast was interesting...
There are those who wonder if Rose wrote the Little House Books...based on this example of her writing, my answer would be a resounding "not a chance"
Banal
This book is an excellent portrayal of the early settlement of this country and shows the hardships faced by the pioneers. This is excellent reading material for family reading time with young children and for developing the reading skills of elementary level children. I have always believed that a child with reading skills is a more successful student.
Faugami
Written by the daughter of Laura Ingalls Wilder, readers familiar with her work will see many similarities in this story to Wilder's real life episodes. I recommend it for all readers who want another glimpse into what life was like on the prairies of South Dakota.
HeonIc
Rose Wilder Lane describes the character and thoughts of a man consumed with a passion for living and an intense desire to gain control over his environment and independence from his immediate society. Lane's hero, David Beaton, is a self-made man with home-grown ethics of pride and personal responsibilty, but pragmatic enough to recognize that he isn't like his father, a man who scraped the majority of his years out on a small sections of tough, tree-clogged land. James Beaton bought his home and family life with blood, sweat, and tears, always refusing to accept debt and charity; he struggled, holding onto tenacious individualism, in order to be able to look around himself and claim ownership of everything he had accomplished. David, however, sees the chance to accelerate his life, not by any less of a dose of hard work, but by taking on risk out on the Dakota praires during the claim rush of the 1880's.

By his disciplined saving and hard work as a young man, David acquires enough money to apply for his own claim and betting his wits, muscles, and guts against the high chance that a wheat crop will fail. His father disapproves, but David's determination carries him with his new bride, the beautiful Mary Lathrop, out to Dakota Territory several hundred miles west to begin adult life on his own terms. The conflict with his father's ideas inflames David's personal battles with insecurity, and forces him to draw from within himself his desires and address who he really is and what he really wants.

Lane's tale shows the struggles of a young man carving out his place in the universe, accepting his tools, but not accepting his environment as master over him. There is a constant pressure and urgency to Lane's hero, as he constantly realizes that this is "his" life and he must not just survive, but conquer all that rises up before him. Finnancial troubles, merciless weather, despair, and loneliness are constant challenges to David's pride and hope for the future. Lane paints her hero as a man fueled and motivated by something deep inside himself -- a confidence of the way things OUGHT to be. Sometimes hanging on solely by his belief that his blessings require him to stay the course, David is an interesting contrast to contemporary urban warriors wielding smartphones and disposable incomes.

What Lane achieves is to reveal an economic reality--sort of; she alludes that the core of why we have what we have is because the indomitable human spirit (and perhaps a casualty of the hazy success of our developed service economy) was at one point tapped to create the building blocks of industrialized society. Environmental stressors and the ability to manage them are the engine of human growth and the secret to the joy of living. Lane suggests, via her sympathetic characters, that when we are stretched we grow and that only when we are in acting in faith do we truly feel alive.
Xor
Outstanding, very similar to Laura Wilder's work and you'll figure out why. This book is not for children as many complex situations are discussed. If you know Roses writing mom you will want to read this. She is a very fine writer.
KiddenDan
I love all of Laura Ingalls Winder's books, and this one by her daughter was just as good.
this is a great book. it is about a family striggling through life. this is a great book. I have enjoyed reading it

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