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» » Crow: Temple of Night
Crow: Temple of Night e-book

Author:

S P Somtow

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Genre Fiction

ePub size:

1969 kb

Other formats:

rtf lit docx mobi

Rating:

4.6

Publisher:

HarperEntertainment (November 7, 2000)

ISBN:

0061059935

Crow: Temple of Night e-book

by S P Somtow


Somtow takes his familiarity of Egyptian, Native American and Thai s and turns them all inside out while still pointing out the similarities.

as long as it isn't the same white male playing a crow, i'll read 'em al. .Somtow takes his familiarity of Egyptian, Native American and Thai s and turns them all inside out while still pointing out the similarities. This book is a perfect example of how and why creativity can overcome the stigma of the usual sequel; and while this is not Somtow's strongest work, it is still pure Somtow. 3 people found this helpful.

The Crow: Temple of Night.

by. Somtow, S. P. Publication date. Crow (Fictitious character). New York : HarperEntertainment.

Temple of Night actually succeeds where every other "sequel" has failed. It touches your soul. Somtow does just that. The Crow has never been better in this atmospheric and careening dive into the underworld of modern Bangkok. The entire point of the Crow is not about getting revenge, it's about moving beyond the fetters that your anger forces upon you, that chain you to your past life. You can't help but smell the sin and feel the pain around you while . Somtow takes you on a tour of humanity's scarred underbelly.

amp; International Retailers. Crow, The: Temple of NIght. Turn-of-the-century Bangkok is a glittering modern city where high-tech industry and ancient mystery meet

amp; International Retailers. Turn-of-the-century Bangkok is a glittering modern city where high-tech industry and ancient mystery meet. It is a powerhouse of international finance by day. and a playground of depravity by night. The Klong Toey shantytowns are home to shadowy eroticemporiums, where millionaire celebrities act out their darkest sexual fantasies, protected by money, influence, and American diplomacy.

Crow, The: Temple of NIght. Short Title CROW TEMPLE OF NIGHT.

Read Somtow's new books as they are serialized - new performances as they are posted. Thank you for visiting my Patreon page! If you have been reading my books since the 1980s, you will see that . Somtow, world fantasy award-winning author of Mallworld, Vampire Junction, and the Inquestor Tetralogy hasn't gone away!

He is also a science fiction, fantasy, and horror author writing in English. Somtow has both Thai and American citizenship. A descendant of the Royal Chakri dynasty (his grandfather's sister was a cousin and consort of King Vajiravudh), Somtow was born in Bangkok

Manufacturer: HarperCollins Release date: 15 January 2000 ISBN-10 : 0061073482 ISBN-13: 9780061073489.

The Eternal One

At our human limits, when we've gone as far as flesh and imagination can take us, meet the Eternal One. The Crow.

His alabaster delicate features tell of his ivory goddess ancestry. Immemorially old, and inconsolable, he is there only for those who seek both revenge and love, and are willing to go all the way--and beyond.

Temple Of Night

Turn-of-the-century Bangkok is a glittering modern city where high-tech industry and ancient mystery meet. It is a powerhouse of international finance by day...and a playground of depravity by night. The Klong Toey shantytowns are home to shadowy erotic emporiums, where millionaire celebrities act out their darkest sexual fantasies, protected by money, influence, and American diplomacy.

Enter a young American journalist, assigned to expose the latest cover-up. Stephen is about to break the two cardinal rules of journalism: Don't fall in love. And don't get killed....


Grari
A worthwhile read, in my opinion.

The writing is generally pleasing, with a simple, straightforward narrative that pairs well with the tone and subject matter. The book manages to be functional and easy to read, while waxing poetic and eloquent at times; overall, I found the writing to be satisfying (if not a triumph of contemporary prose). The story, likewise, is coherent and complete, with solid characters, good pacing, and an appropriate ending; and though it, too, probably won't win any awards, it does have its moments. The closest thing I had to a complaint was a few sequences that came off as awkward and illogical (to me, anyhow; I might've just missed something). In a nut: I could see most adult readers taking some measure of enjoyment in 'Temple,' especially if one is a fan of the franchise (or Thailand and its culture, which feature prominently in the text).

Personally, there is one thing that upgraded the book for me: its spiritual element. Namely, 'Temple' contains a large metaphysical subtext, and not in a perfunctory, shallow manner, either. As it were, the story and events are threaded with several themes and concepts which, if viewed “with eyes to see,” can actually yield some powerful truth (or so I perceived it, at least). Thus, in the course of my reading it, 'Temple' shifted from mere fiction to something more, with practical, real-world merit. Your mileage may vary, of course; but, for what it's worth, I took much from it in this regard.

My sincere thanks goes out to this book's author and publisher. I am grateful for, and have benefited from, your work and service.

* * *

Some notable quotes from 'The Crow: Temple of Night':

“Structure was what a good [television] segment was all about. With good structure, you can make an audience believe anything. Good television was the most powerful weapon in the civilized world.” – p.47

“Illusion, illusion, he thought. Nothing is real, why then this pain?” – p.152

“'Something is happening to me. I'm changing. I'm no longer sure of anything.' 'I know. That is why you [are] still alive. Not to change … that is truly death.'” – p.166
Dagdarad
The Crow Temple Of The Night
(A compression of past reviews for history sake)
I liked more since it seemed more spiritual..
August 18, 2000
a foreign crow..as long as it isn't the same white male playing a crow, i'll read 'em all..

What Was I Thinking?
March 27, 2004
What was I on with my last review for this book? Anyways, being the 4th book so far in the series, it did manage to add some different elements, like past lives and supernatural forces. I liked the fact that Stephen Lelliot could call upon crows to help him in his journey. What I didn't like though was that the action didn't start until 3/4 of the story. That and the end battle was very confusing and what I could understand, there wasn't enough happening. Also, the villian,"Dirk Temple" seemed like a cousin to the bad guy,"Joseph Lethe" in Lazarus Heart. Too many times for that type of character in my honest opinion. Out of all these books so far, Clash By Night is the best one(in my honest opinion).

This book, this series, is born of the same pain and loss that informs O'Barr's original tale of The Crow. Which is why I don't actuall connect with this one as much. This story comes from more of the Eastern flavor of beliefs, of acceptance and where your path may laie. As it is. this book is definitely a slow burn,compared to those before it. You are introduced to a woman named Linda Dusit in the beginning who is not only the spiritual anchor in the story but the anchor to the main avatar, whom I may add, is murdered shortly after his "eternal lover". Now, I can see why I had the problem with this story with my last review and to a point, it seems meandering but I think it's drawn that way because Stephen is so much into his career that he might be oblivious to what was intended to be, that his aunt, Dusit, not only sees the coming deaths but accepts it. Det. Samreung is also trying to make things go smoothly not just because of the customs of the land but because of the order that his police force maintains. It wasn't until Dirk Temple, a bureacrat, later sets up for the children to "acid down" Stephen that I found myself angered, that Stephen was trying to do something good for himself and whom he knows and literally could not avoid that attack. Unless I remember incorrectly, to a point in my last review, Temple has a profoundly supernatural slant to his motives whereas Lethe found the transsexuals abhorent. I briefly and had to backtrack for a second to remember that the Ambassador is not Dirk Temple, the antagonist in the book. Otherwise, it's almost like we, as the reader, near the few final chapters, are going between Duan's perspective and a general perspective. You're given the idea that Dusit is a angelc guardian and that Ai Tong is the demonic head, observing all. As for the end, it still remained a little hard to follow to a point, but i understood more and all that Stephen did was wear out Temple enough, physically and in regards to his dark force until Stephen could destroy him on a human level. I think this one missed the mark, in my opinion. I think that the author's intent was that you would feel for Dao(which incidentally means, The way") and Stephen and their eternal love but I honestly didn't totally feel it. Somewhat, yes but there could have been more exposition, perhaps more memories, more dreams in that regard. Unless I change my mind, I would rate this 3 out of 5, almost 2. It's a nice general story but left me lacking too much.
Anayaron
The original comics that started the Crow franchise were well done, an excellent work even if it was cathartic in nature. The first movie was a wonderful adaptation, but every thing that has come out since is garbage. With one exception. Temple of Night actually succeeds where every other "sequel" has failed. It touches your soul. The entire point of the Crow is not about getting revenge, it's about moving beyond the fetters that your anger forces upon you, that chain you to your past life. Somtow takes his familiarity of Egyptian, Native American and Thai mythologies/religions and turns them all inside out while still pointing out the similarities. This book is a perfect example of how and why creativity can overcome the stigma of the usual sequel; and while this is not Somtow's strongest work, it is still pure Somtow.
Onath
I have read the entire series of The Crow, and this was not as enjoyable as the rest. Insightful on Thai culture, and eye opening in terms of how governments interact and the realities about the sex industry. However, I felt this was written for someone better familiarized with Thai culture and would have been enjoyed and understood better by someone who knows the culture better. Otherwise it was very hard to relate to or envision, imagine. Perhaps someone familiar with the Buddhist religion could have followed this better. Either way it was an interesting take on The Crow mythos.

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