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» » The Ocean in the Closet
The Ocean in the Closet e-book

Author:

Yuko Taniguchi

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Genre Fiction

ePub size:

1187 kb

Other formats:

mobi doc txt rtf

Rating:

4.8

Publisher:

Coffee House Press; F First Edition, First Printing edition (May 1, 2007)

Pages:

255

ISBN:

1566891949

The Ocean in the Closet e-book

by Yuko Taniguchi


Yuko Taniguchi, author of the critically acclaimed book of poetry Foreign Wife Elegy, was born in Yokohama, Japan, in 1975. Taniguchi creates a distinct interior world that the reader can readily enter. The Ocean in the Closet by Yuko Taniguchi.

Yuko Taniguchi, author of the critically acclaimed book of poetry Foreign Wife Elegy, was born in Yokohama, Japan, in 1975. At the age of fifteen, she came to the United States and attended high school in Maryland, obtaining her collegiate degrees in Minnesota, where she continues to make her home. I was very excited to read Yuko Taniguchi’s novel because she is a fellow tango dancer. I met her once at a tango event in Rochester and thought she danced beautifully.

Yuko Taniguchi is the author of a collection of poetry, Foreign Wife Elegy (Coffee House Press, 2004) and a novel, The Ocean in. .

Yuko Taniguchi is the author of a collection of poetry, Foreign Wife Elegy (Coffee House Press, 2004) and a novel, The Ocean in the Closet (Coffee House Press, 2007). Some of her awards include finalist for The Dayton Literary Peace Prize, the Kiriyama Prize Notable Book, the Gustavus Myers Center Outstanding Book Award Advancing Human Rights, and the McKnight Artist Fellowship for Writers. Taniguchi’s most current project involves documenting the lives of the residents in Tohoku, the Northeastern part of Japan that was affected by the earthquake and tsunami in March, 2011.

Yuko Taniguchi's writing is remarkable for its music and vision. In the sounds of ice breaking in the river, silkworms eating mulberry leaves in the night, and Mahler played on the double bass, her characters hear the music of human suffering and redemption. The Ocean in the Closet is a compelling and moving novel. -Kyoko MoriIn sunny California, the Vietnam War may have just ended, but nine-year-old Helen Johnson's world is beginning to crumble.

Yuko Taniguchi has created a beautiful and poignant novel that adroitly spans generations and continents to explore the intricate workings of the human heart in.

Yuko Taniguchi has created a beautiful and poignant novel that adroitly spans generations and continents to explore the intricate workings of the human heart in times of war and peace. Chitra Divakaruni, author of Queen of Dreams and Sister of My Heart. The aftermath of war lies at the core of this engaging novel, which also explores the universal themes of ties to both family and homeland. This is one of the themes behind The Ocean in the Close. he book traces the painful impact of war on several generations of one family on both sides of the Pacific, in Japan and the United States.

Honorable Mention, The 2007 Gustayus Myers Center Outstanding Book Awards Advancing Human Rights. The Ocean in the Closet. ISBN 978-1-56689-194-3.

Yuko Taniguchi (born in Yokohama, Japan) is a Japanese American poet, and novelist. Honorable Mention, The 2007 Gustayus Myers Center Outstanding Book Awards Advancing Human Rights.

Discover ideas about Book Outlet. The Brain's Way of Healing is a book about neuroplasticity and healing written by Norman Doidge. The premise of his book rests on our new understanding of the. A girl reaches across an ocean to heal three generations from the aftermath o. ook Outlet Books Online. NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The New York Times–bestselling author of The Brain That Changes Itself presents astounding advances in the treatment of brain injury and illness.

Taniguchi, Yuko 1975–PERSONAL:Born 1975, in Yokohama, Japan . The Ocean in the Closet is a fiction work that nevertheless builds on the author's Japanese American experience.

Taniguchi, Yuko 1975–PERSONAL:Born 1975, in Yokohama, Japan; immigrated to the United States, c. 1990; married Peter Wenzel (a nurse). Education: College of St. Benedict/St. John's University, . University of Minnesota, . ADDRESSES:Home-Southeast Rochester, MN. Source for information on Taniguchi, Yuko 1975–: Contemporary Authors dictionary. Her poetry book draws on her experiences as a Japanese immigrant, as well as on her husband's work dealing with life-and-death situations.

Yuko Taniguchi, author of the critically acclaimed book of poetry Foreign Wife Elegy, was . Do not disturb the wire pulled under the ocean for thousands of miles. Not for Taniguchi, who does this expertly several times in the book, using metaphors that are surprisingly fresh and accurate. From "Elegy for Cello and Orchestra:" "Strings rub each other as his sorrow slips from the cello; he closes his eyes.

A diffident debut from poet Taniguchi. Pub Date: May 1st, 2007.

“Yuko Taniguchi’s writing is remarkable for its music and vision. In the sounds of ice breaking in the river, silkworms eating mulberry leaves in the night, and Mahler played on the double bass, her characters hear the music of human suffering and redemption. . . . The Ocean in the Closet is a compelling and moving novel.”—Kyoko Mori

In sunny California, the Vietnam War may have just ended, but nine-year-old Helen Johnson’s world is beginning to crumble. Her father, a former POW and Vietnam veteran, has become increasingly distant; her mother, a Japanese adoptee, is struggling with mental illness; and her six-year-old brother is too young to understand what’s happening. Determined to find out more about her mother’s past and with a boldness that belies her timid self-image, Helen writes to her great-uncle Hideo in Japan, beginning a journey that will take her across the ocean and through the imperial legacies of both countries.

As Hideo and his wife recount the stories of his family’s silk business in Hiroshima, their experiences in China and Japan during and after World War II, and the fate of his sister Ume, Helen’s grandmother, they discover that although their lives have been darkened by war, their future can be healed by tending their shared roots. In this beautiful debut novel, Yuko Taniguchi creates a moving story of hope and redemption, of tragedy and resilience, and of the secrets, burdens, and ultimate strength that lie in a young girl’s heart.

Yuko Taniguchi, author of the critically acclaimed book of poetry Foreign Wife Elegy, was born in Yokohama, Japan, in 1975. At the age of fifteen, she came to the United States and attended high school in Maryland, obtaining her collegiate degrees in Minnesota, where she continues to make her home. Visit her website at www.yukotaniguchi.com.


Modifyn
4.5 stars

Taniguchi writes at the intersection of human life: intersection of sanity and trauma, the intersection of history and modern life, the intersection of Japanese culture and US, and the intersection of war and peace. These places are the most interesting, and the most revealing.

The story begins with a letter from a 10 year old American girl to a great Uncle in Japan she has never met.

Little by little, this girls' life is revealed to the reader. Her helpless and PTSD father; a mother who locks her and her brother in the closet when life becomes too difficult, a complicated family history, and an American Uncle and Aunt who will do their best to shield the girl and her brother from the unfairness of having parents too traumatized by life to take care of them.

Helen's mother is the half-Japanese, half American adopted daughter of a lady Helen only knows as Mrs. Hogan. Her biological grandmother is one of the forgotten victims of World War II-- a "comfort woman"-- forced to work in a brothel for occupying American soldiers. Her great uncle has never forgotten the little baby his sister was forced to give up to an orphanage. When Helen's letter comes, the uncle remembers both the devastation his own family suffered under allied bombing, but also his wife's terrible experiences as a settler in Manchuria.

Through a visit to Japan, Helen hopes to help her mother heal, and the uncle hopes to regain some sense of his dead sister.

The prose is very straight-forward and has a naive quality to it that is reflected in Helen's character. Despite being a 10 year old, she has the wonder and belief-in-magical of a much younger child.

"I didn't know how many stamps I had to put on for this letter for going all the way to Japan. I guessed and put ten stamps. I didn't want it to go halfway and come back in the middle of the sky."

This touching innocence, along with the quite harrowing details of war-time life, are another intersection where Taniguchi's story reveals a kind of transcending truth.

While the majority of the characters kind of blur together in that they all have this deep sadness but naive trust about them, the views of Japan both from Helen's and the Uncle's eyes as well as the differing points of view on Japan's involvement in the war are very interesting.

A story about the ways people become broken.
Andriodtargeted
In my vast reading experience, I have yet to find many novels that really speak to the aftermath of war in the way that this one did for me. Honestly, war is one major topic I tend to shy away from in my reading. Maybe that this book focuses on the affects of war, and how they reverberate through generations is why I managed to get through it and love every page.

The story is told from two perspectives; the first is Helen, a nine year old girl living with a father suffering from PTSD (a Vietnam vet) and a mother who is disconnected from reality. When she's sent to live with her aunt and uncle, she begins to discover things about her parents which lead her on a journey to Japan to discover more about her mother's past.

The second is Hideo, Helen's great-uncle. From him, we learn about Ume, Helen's grandmother, and Helen's mother Anna. The strict Japanese culture combined with the horrors of WWII in Japan lead Ume to make horrible decisions to give her child the best possible life. Here we see how the history of this family is passed down to Helen, and how Helen must be the one to reconnect with the past instead of being distant from it.

Language is everything in this book; from the way the image of water is depicted to the culture of Japan, every page is beautiful. It surprises you and breaks your heart with the stories revealed, but the whole time you see how the awful pasts of each character reflects in their present. It's not always a positive reflection, but it is always honest. Rarely do you get a book that's honesty moves you as much as this one does.
Bluddefender
The Ocean in the closet is a fantastic and beautifully written book...And now one of my favorites.
I ordered this book as soon as it came out, after having read Taniguchi's "Foreign Wife Elegy".

The story is about a mother, Anna, going through a nervous breakdown, and her young daughter Helen, trying to understand why. This leads Helen to Hideo's home in Japan. Hideo has been wondering about Anna, his niece, who was adopted by a family in the U.S.

I enjoyed the easy flow between Hideo/Japan & Helen/USA (notice the chapter titles!). I also enjoy Taniguchi's writing - her similes, metaphors, allegories, how Helen & Hideo describe their feelings.

It's a well-written beautiful story with fantastic imagery and descriptions.

I would definitely like to see another novel (or book of poetry) by Yuko Taniguchi.

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