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» » Old Times
Old Times e-book

Author:

Harold PINTER

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Dramas & Plays

ePub size:

1171 kb

Other formats:

mobi lrf docx txt

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

Eyre Methuen; Reprint edition (1972)

Pages:

80

ISBN:

0413293602

Old Times e-book

by Harold PINTER


The original script of the drama play Old Times by Harold Pinter.

The original script of the drama play Old Times by Harold Pinter.

Financial Times 'Harold Pinter's poetic, Proustian Old Times has the inscrutability of a mysterious picture, and th. .This revised third volume of Harold Pinter's work includes The Homecoming, Old Times, No Man's Land, four shorter plays, six revue sketches and a short story. It also contains the speech given by Pinter in 1970 on being awarded the German Shakespeare Prize.

Old Times (Pinter, Harold. has been added to your Cart. Harold Pinter is at his best when he's writing as an uncluttered existentialist. This may explain why his play The Homecoming is so popular and so frequently performed. Unwittingly, his characters play roles that are readily interpretable and that reinforce each other throughout a performance. They certainly are not caricatures, but as circumstances evolve and the context becomes clearer, the way they behave makes a sort of sense that's peculiar to their setting.

Old Times is a play by the Nobel Laureate Harold Pinter. It was first performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company at the Aldwych Theatre in London on 1 June 1971. It starred Colin Blakely, Dorothy Tutin, and Vivien Merchant, and was directed by Peter Hall. The play was dedicated to Hall to celebrate his 40th birthday.

Like Pinter's earlier plays, Old Times deals with bare essentials. There are only three characters: a man named Deeley, his wife Kate, and Anna, a friend of Kate's whom they have not seen for twenty years. Like Pinter's earlier plays, Old Times deals with bare essentials.

Like Pinter's earlier plays. Pinter deals with bare essentials. There are only three characters - a man named Deeley, his wife, Kate, and Anna, a friend of Kate's whom they have not seen in 20 years. Like Pinter's earlier plays.

As we approach the holiday season, we wanted to take some time to thank all of the people who supported our production of Old Times-we reached our fundraising goal! And we couldn't have done it without so many people.

Old Times - the first Pinter play to be staged at the former Comedy Theatre since it was renamed in the playwright's honour - sees Sewell's Deeley and his wife Kate visited by her old flatmate, Anna, whom Deeley has never met. A power struggle ensues between husband and friend as they. A power struggle ensues between husband and friend as they fight for the affections of the withdrawn Kate, using the power of memory in an attempt to get old fires burning. The biggest talking point for the critics concerned the role reversals of Scott Thomas and Williams, who play Kate and Anna on alternate nights.

Harold Pinter, the British playwright and a Nobel laureate in literature, died De. Mr. Pinter was a very vocal critic of totalitarian and imperialist politics.

Harold Pinter, the British playwright and a Nobel laureate in literature, died Dec. 24, 2008. He was rightly perceived to be the heir to Samuel Beckett, who was his friend and mentor. Like Beckett, Mr. Pinter, above, in 1999, created worlds profoundly comic and tragic, in which meaning is never fixed, memory lies and people are betrayed not just by one another but also by their own minds. His work as a screenwriter included adaptations of "The French Lieutenant's Woman," his own "Betrayal" and, more recently, Anthony Shaffer's "Sleuth.

The script booklet for the Harold Pinter play "Old times". Twenty years after they had lived togehter in London Anna visits Kate, now married to Deeley. The visit stirs vivid memories of old times in all three, sometimes complementary, sometimes conflicting. Yet as the play progresses it becomes clear that what is stirred in them is more than memory - it is also an awareness of the gulfs between them.
Aradwyn
Classic Best of Pinter.
Zyniam
Just what I wanted and ordered.
Renthadral
Harold Pinter is at his best when he's writing as an uncluttered existentialist. This may explain why his play The Homecoming is so popular and so frequently performed. Unwittingly, his characters play roles that are readily interpretable and that reinforce each other throughout a performance. They certainly are not caricatures, but as circumstances evolve and the context becomes clearer, the way they behave makes a sort of sense that's peculiar to their setting. Their lives may be fundamentally meaningless and of no lasting consequence, but while their influence is manifest on stage, we can understand them.

In Old Times, however, Printer's presentation is a good deal more complex. The overlap between existentialism and the theater of the absurd is evident, and, as a result, Old Times requires interpretation through a different lens. Old Times is distinctive because, though it is a brief play, it repeats itself throughout. Each time through more bits and pieces of memories of things as much as twenty years past are revealed, prompting reinterpretation of what we've already seen, and the reinterpretations themselves call forth more memories, or perhaps fantasies that we construe as memories of things that actually happened.

In the process, Old Times' three characters are themselves transformed in ways that may render them sharply inconsistent with our first take on them, their understanding of each other, and their evaluations of themselves. The characters play off each other, the newly recovered memories of one reflecting on the others, and enabling them to respond in kind. The reconstituted pictures that emerge are sometimes troubling, casting, for example, a man who pridefully thought of himself as a bit of a rake, into the role of a pathetic voyeur whose wife may not always have been as chaste as he had assumed.

Old Times also intimates that perhaps at least one of the three characters is long dead. Her participation, with her presumed stock of memories, fantasies, and time-dependent correctives is due to the others' memories of her, imagining how the memories might have been distorted to their own advantage, and then attributing the revised images and interpretations directly to her, as if she were still there to respond.

As the play proceeds, the characters invoke trivial items and traits -- a casserole, vegetarianism, bath powder, the likely response to a white dinner jacket in mainland China of the '70's, a marble floor ... -- in an unself-conscious effort to more suitably reconfigure the past and their place in it. At the end, it is unclear that much of anything has really changed. The characters' initial views of themselves and each other were, it seems, as good as anything that has emerged.

I always enjoy reading Pinter, and I enjoyed reading Old Times. This is not, however, one of his better plays. Perhaps he tried too hard to say something new. I think he succeeded, but the effort exerted gives us a play that seems unduly contrived and, at least in part, pointlessly obscure.
Cointrius
This was my second Pinter play, and I must say that I enjoyed Old Times much more than The Homecoming, which felt too unpleasant.
There is no plot to speak of, but it has three enigmatic characters (one male, two females) who discuss events in the past. This really doesn't belong in the 'theatre of the absurd' category, but one can call it a 'nominal comedy', along the same lines as Albee's A Delicate Balance, because everything is the same at the end as the beginning.
The reason this play works is due to Pinter's growing control over his characters and the complete brilliance he has in his situational writing. He doesn't write of plots, but he raises so many questions. The fact that none are answered is really of no consequence. It is a difficult play, but a rewarding one.
Fordredor
In reading Pinter's "Old Times" (1970) one gets the feeling that much of the novelty of the Theater of the Absurd has worn thin. Pinter's work seems far less of a breakthrough than it once did. Then we were engrossed by what was new and novel, but now new realities, new trends and the return of old trends have appeared. Today's theater is less cerebral, less demanding, more facile and superficial--just as it was before the Theater of the Absurd was in its heyday. Perhaps audiences have been lulled back to sleep.
Psychologically this play is still interesting because it deals with time and memory in an unfamiliar manner. Kate and Deeley are married living away from the London. Kate's old friend Anna is visiting after twenty years. We are faced with ambiguities and gnawing questions. Were Anna and Kate lovers in the past? Did Deeley know Anna in the past? When the play first begins is Anna really in the room? And what does borrowed underwear have to do with the eroticism evident in the play? Is Pinter manipulating us? Playing with us?
The play begins with Absurdist questions and dialogue with some real nonsense lines. Pinter is interested in words, their true meanings, and silences. Some familiar lyrics from old songs are sung by Deeley and Anna such as "Blue moon, I see you standing alone..."
Deeley is apparently a movie director or someone connected with movies. At one point he says he's Orson Welles. There's a lot of mystifying behavior and conversation in the play.
The play has the usual Pinteresque suspense and sense of menace, but it's more obscure, opaque. Why are we uneasy, disturbed by what is occurring? For Deeley the two women seem to merge into one. Does Anna ever show up at all or is it really just Deeley and Kate? Does Anna still exist? This play has one of Pinter's most enigmatic closing scenes.
Vispel
There are three persons who talk about their past. But the point is that they don't really talk about old times. Everyone tells things that happened in the past and no one knows if they are true. Those things have no context. They are a lot of sexual hints by Deeley. Also strange is that Deeley didn't tell his wife that he already knows Anna. We don't recommend this book because we didn't understand well the sense of the story. In this story you have to read between the lines, and it could happen that even then you are not able to understand the play.
Mopimicr
I believe that this play is very well written. Just like Pinters other plays, he has added an element of comedy to it, yet omits the "real ending" leaving you to imagine what happens after the lights go down. Harold Pinter and be closely compared to Samuel Beckett, they both refuse to give explanations of the characters or endings. I recommend this book if you like to use your imagination.
"Old Times" isn't about a story because there really isn't one. It's about the idea of memory being relative. It's about the basics, three people left to discuss the real or not so real past. I think anyone could read this play and appreciate it. Keep an open mind and don't be too preoccupied with "what happened".

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