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» » The Birthday Party The Room
The Birthday Party  The Room e-book

Author:

Harold Pinter

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Dramas & Plays

ePub size:

1702 kb

Other formats:

lrf lit lrf docx

Rating:

4.9

Publisher:

Grove Press; Revised edition (January 20, 1994)

Pages:

120

ISBN:

0802151140

The Birthday Party The Room e-book

by Harold Pinter


The Birthday Party" by Harold Pinter.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. The Birthday Party" by Harold Pinter.

The Birthday Party is one of Harold Pinter's earliest and most difficult plays. It depicts the banal and inane ways in which its characters, everyday lower middle class folks, keep the otherwise pointless connections among each other active. In spite of the obvious annoyance of the interlocutors, especially Petey and Stanley, Meg maintains her mock cheerful and inquisitive banter, ignoring the rudely dismissive responses of the others.

The Birthday Party (1957) is the second full-length play by Harold Pinter, first published in London by Encore Publishing in 1959. It is one of his best-known and most frequently performed plays

The Birthday Party (1957) is the second full-length play by Harold Pinter, first published in London by Encore Publishing in 1959. It is one of his best-known and most frequently performed plays. In the setting of a rundown seaside boarding house, a little birthday party is turned into a nightmare when two sinister strangers arrive unexpectedly.

Start by marking The Birthday Party & The Room as Want to Read . Pinter rocks in his first well-made play, The Birthday Party (1958). I was excited that my book club's choice of the month was a play because I am the only one in the group who enjoys reading plays

Start by marking The Birthday Party & The Room as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. I was excited that my book club's choice of the month was a play because I am the only one in the group who enjoys reading plays. My excitement was short-lived. The Birthday Party was so/so.

Harold Pinter’s speech of thanks on receiving the David Cohen British Literature Prize for 1995

Harold Pinter’s speech of thanks on receiving the David Cohen British Literature Prize for 1995. The Prize is awarded every two years in recognition of a lifetime’s achievement by a living British writer. This is a great honour. I started writing plays in 1957 and in 1958 The Birthday Party opened at the Lyric, Hammersmith, was massacred by the critics (with the exception of Harold Hobson) and was taken off after eight performances. I decided to pop in to the Thursday matinee. I was a few minutes late and the curtain had gone up.

This volume contains Harold Pinter's first six plays, including The Birthday Party

This volume contains Harold Pinter's first six plays, including The Birthday Party. The Birthday Party Stanley Webber is visited in his boarding house by two strangers, Goldberg and McCann. An innocent-seeming birthday party for Stanley turns into a nightmare

This volume contains Harold Pinter's first six plays, including The Birthday Party. An innocent-seeming birthday party for Stanley turns into a nightmare.

This volume contains Harold Pinter's first six plays, including The Birthday Party. An innocent-seeming birthday party for Stanley turns into a nightmare

Harold Pinter's The Birthday Party is about playing games, creating the past, meaninglessness/ Meaningfulness, nothing . The deleting of the scene will not make much difference except of course; Harold Pinter's The Birthday Party will have to do with another name.

Harold Pinter's The Birthday Party is about playing games, creating the past, meaninglessness/ Meaningfulness, nothing/ everything, but most of all it is about invasion of the domestic sphere and the destruction of the private space. Meg: He's been here about a year no. Stanley Webber is the parasite that eats into the domestic structure of the Meg- Petey household.

We’ll have a party, eh? What do you say?’ Have you got your tickets to Harold Pinter’s dark comic masterpiece yet? ww. hebirthdayparty.

In The Birthday Party, a musician who escapes to a dilapidated boarding house becomes the victim of a ritual murder in which everyone- assassins, victim, and observers- implacably plays out the role assigned him by fate.The Room, a derelict boarding house again becomes the scene of a visitation of fate when a blind Black man suddenly arrives to deliver a mysterious message.
Ynneig
Not the cheeriest of plays, but probably an accurate depiction of post-WWII (first performed in 1958) despair and numbness. None of the characters (a late middle aged couple who run a below-standard boarding house, Meg and Petey Boles; their sole boarder, Stanley Webber; a friendly and pretty local girl, Lulu; and a pair of ominous visitors whose motives are explored but never fully explained, Mssrs. McCann and Goldberg) is very likable. But one can’t help but feel some sympathy for Stanley who may or may not be a down-on-his-luck musician who descends into some sort of madness at the provocation of the two unexplained intruders. I suspect Pinter was influenced by Beckett’s Waiting for Godot (1952 French; 1954 English) with its blend of vaudeville and sadomasochistic elements. And subsequently, The Birthday Party’s influence on Edward Albee (Who’ Afraid of Virginia Woolf?) and Mart Crowley (The Boys in the Band) seems equally likely. The Room, the one-act play included in this volume, has a lot in common with the longer play and is equally deserving of a read.
Via
I hated both plays and could not imagine sitting through either at a theatre or how PInter became so esteemed. The plays seemed nonsensical to me and thus utterly boring. Had they not been so short, I never would have finished reading. Quite disappointing as another book I read kept referring to "The Birthday Party" as something special. Possibly the plays have some deep sociological meaning but they are not, to me, remotely entertaining.
Siramath
I have seen "The Birthday Party" three times in three different productions and love the writing so much i had to have it. Pinter is one of those few playwrights who reward re-reading as well as re-viewing. The characters leap off the page. Like many of this master's plays it is a magnificent blend of the comic and the somber. For those who have not been able to catch the play on the stage or screen, if you enjoy modern drama you will most certainly enjoy this play. As for "The Room" is an apprentice piece - not at all bad, but Pinter had not fully come into his own at the time he wrote it. If you enjoy "The Birthday Party" be certain to also purchase his masterpiece "The Homecoming". Happy reading.
Zulurr
This book keeps you entertained but is thoroughly confusing because the reader doesn't know what is real, unreal, serves a purpose or not. It's focused on this birthday party held for a man who is living under this couple's boarding house. Two unknown men come and basically drive Stanley mad.
lifestyle
very great and fast shipping A++++ Thank you so much!!
Laitchai
ehh. Not terrible
Diredefender
The Birthday Party is one of Harold Pinter's earliest and most difficult plays. It depicts the banal and inane ways in which its characters, everyday lower middle class folks, keep the otherwise pointless connections among each other active. In spite of the obvious annoyance of the interlocutors, especially Petey and Stanley, Meg maintains her mock cheerful and inquisitive banter, ignoring the rudely dismissive responses of the others. She serves them because that is her role as wife for Petey and cook/housekeeper for Stanley, presumably a boarder. Given the sexual division of labor in the world as we commonly find it, the objects of her attention and concern are conventionally ungrateful, demanding, and sarcastic. A family of sorts, playing commonplace familial roles in routine and deeply unsatisfying ways, none less boring, unimaginative, or brutally prescriptive than those played by the obviously put upon Meg, to whom the men's assessment really matters.

When Petey announces that they may be having two additional boarders, it's taken matter-of-factly, as if we had known all along that Meg and Petey's home was a largely uninhabited rooming house. In general, letting out rooms is evidence of a need for additional income and hardly a basis for a claim of higher status and social prestige. However, Meg is up to the challenge of redefining their circumstances by repeatedly insisting that their house "is on the list." The nature of the list is unspecified, but Meg's repeatedly made claim seems most sensibly taken as a list of the best, most respectable boarding houses in the area. It is significant, I think, that we are left with no evidence that Stanley, the putative boarder, pays for the room, board, and safeguarded sleeping-'til-noon that constitutes what we know of this former musician's present life. Nevertheless, it seems to Meg that she can announce that today is Stanley's birthday and that it should be special.

The arrival of the new boarders, Goldberg and McCann, provides Meg with enthusiastic support for her judgment as to the importance of Stanley's birthday. Goldberg and McCann recommend five bottle of Scotch and one of Irish, and that provides the celebratory foundation for the party. No birthday cake? Perhaps there wasn't time, who knows? Stanley is ambivalent at best, even denying that it's actually his birthday. The roster of revelers is fleshed out with the arrival of Lulu, a woman in her twenties, presumably a neighbor, and it's thinned out with Petey's departure to attend a meeting of his chess club.

The party provides a more or less raucously drunken evening, as Goldberg repeatedly gropes Lulu. If she resists, it's not reported. Stanley is present, but he is hardly the center of congratulatory attention as the birthday boy and guest of honor. When the lights go out (a blown fuse?), Goldberg purposely breaks the frames of Stanley's glasses. Meg revels in being ordained as "belle of the ball," and Stanley has what Goldberg diagnoses as a nervous breakdown.

When all this is explained to Petey the next day, it makes even less sense than it has to this point. The exaggerated interest of Goldberg and McCann in Stanley is self-evident but unexplained. The end of the play is eventful in its own way, but raises questions that have no answers. Meg and Petey, in spite of some inconvenient oversights, resume their lives much as they were when the play began.

The Birthday Party gives its audience enormous -- I think much too much -- latitude in making sense of what they have seen. Is the presence of a Jew, an Irishman, and a (perhaps) freshly deflowered young woman due to anything more than happenstance. Is there a physician named "Monty" who will treat Stanley? Does Petey's uncharacteristic angry outburst mean anything other than that's what people sometimes do?

This is definitely not Pinter at his best. I think The Birthday Party is part of the process of Pinter becoming Pinter, still confusing existentialism and the theater of the absurd with barren, unadorned meaningless. The play remains popular and is frequently performed, perhaps because it is loaded with irrelevant distractions that we may take to mean something even if meaning cannot be discerned.

Pinter may be telling us that interpretation in conventional terms does not apply, or that many interpretations are possible. Those lessons, however are not compelling. Pinter was still becoming Pinter, at his mature best an uncluttered existentialist with a gift for finding just the right word. He had yet to learn that nonsense need not require elaborate substantive confusion. Perhaps he was being too ambitious.

Ironically, and in contrast to The Birthday Party, the dialogue in Pinter's very first play, The Room, is already Pinter at his linguistic best. Speakers repeat themselves, sometimes word for word, the annoyance is palpable, but the redundancy typically elicits no response. Perhaps that explains the repetition: speakers often have no way of knowing if they were heard, but they continue.

Speakers misunderstand and misinterpret or fail to hear each other, but they give scant evidence of awareness of confusion. They just keep talking past each other, as if it was their lot in life to keep the conversation going, even a one-sided conversation, even when misunderstanding, misinterpretation, and failure to hear rule the exchange.

I was born and raised in a working class home where this sort of dialogue was painfully commonplace. There was more explosiveness, more profanity, and more denial, but should the conversation come to a halt, indicating the desire of one or more participants to terminate the exchange, the dominant other would angrily and abusively insist that it continue. Termination was offensive, it meant that the dominant speaker was being unconscionably rude to the point of insanity, and the speaker was outraged. So the exchange continued.

In The Room, the appearance of a blind black man named Riley is unexpected and unwelcome. Nevertheless, he stays long enough to deliver a message that Rose finds upsetting, perhaps cryptic or impossible. Though her husband, Bert, knows none of this, when he returns from his outing he quickly dispenses with Riley, and Rose is met with fright, confusion, and debility.

There is no payback involved, and Bert's treatment of Riley need have no connection to Rose's condition. Things happen, and in some cases they are stunningly ironic. It's foolish to look for cause and effect. Besides, it makes no difference.

The Room, a much shorter and more dialogue-rich play than The Birthday Party, gives us a clearer view of Pinter coming into his own. He gives vivid display of his mastery of the colloquial language of the British working class, and he avoids confusion as to his intent. A better though earlier play than The Birthday Party, one that is more strongly suggestive of the artistry that Pinter brings to bear in his best work, such as The Homecoming. For better or worse, I call it uncluttered existentialism.

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