ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » Shipwreck
Shipwreck e-book

Author:

Louis Begley

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

Contemporary

ePub size:

1675 kb

Other formats:

lit mobi docx mbr

Rating:

4.9

Publisher:

Knopf; 1 edition (September 23, 2003)

Pages:

243

ISBN:

1400040981

Shipwreck e-book

by Louis Begley


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A mesmerizing novel of deception and betrayal from the acclaimed author of Wartime Lies and About Schmidt.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Unusal novel structure-entire book told to a stranger in a bar without interruptions. Louis Begley lives in New York City

Unusal novel structure-entire book told to a stranger in a bar without interruptions. Interesting and well written. Louis Begley lives in New York City. His previous novels are Schmidt Delivered, Wartime Lies, The Man Who Was Late, As Max Saw It, About Schmidt, and Mistler’s Exit. Библиографические данные. Shipwreck Ballantine reader's circle.

Shipwreck is a daring parable of the contradictory impulses that can rend a. .

Shipwreck is a daring parable of the contradictory impulses that can rend a single soul-narcissism and self-loathing, refinement and lust. Unusal novel structure-entire book told to a stranger in a bar without interruptions.

I think I'm going to enjoy writing about Louis Begley's Shipwreck more than I enjoyed reading it. Probably a lot more. There's so many ways to describe why I was so disappointed in this book. North is a published author of several novels of critical success and a faithful, loving husband to Lydia.

Louis Begley’s novels include Memories of a Marriage, Schmidt Steps Back, Matters of Honor, Shipwreck, Schmidt Delivered . A CONVERSATION WITH LOUIS BEGLEY Donald Hall has published twenty books of poetry. His short stories are collected in Willow Temple (2003).

Louis Begley’s novels include Memories of a Marriage, Schmidt Steps Back, Matters of Honor, Shipwreck, Schmidt Delivered, Mistler’s Exit, About Schmidt, As Max Saw It, The Man Who Was Late, and Wartime Lies, which won the PEN/Hemingway Award and the Irish Times/Aer Lingus International Fiction Prize. Forthcoming is a memoir, The Best Day the Worst Day, about his late wife, Jane Kenyon, and a selection of his poetry from 1950 to the present.

Shipwreck Begley, Louis Random House (USA) 9780345464095 : A mesmerizing novel of deception and betrayal from the acclaimed author of Wartime Lies and About Schmidt. Кол-во: о цене Наличие: Отсутствует. Возможна поставка под заказ. При оформлении заказа до: 6 сен 2019 Ориентировочная дата поставки: начало октября При условии наличия книги у поставщика.

Shipwreck is a daring parable of the contradictory impulses that can rend a single soul–narcissism and self-loathing, refinement and lust.

A mesmerizing novel of deception and betrayal from the acclaimed author of Wartime Liesand About Schmidt. Shipwreck is a daring parable of the contradictory impulses that can rend a single soul–narcissism and self-loathing, refinement and lust.

Louis Begley (born October 6, 1933) is a Polish-born Jewish American novelist. He is best known for writing the l Holocaust novel Wartime Lies (1991) and the Schmidt trilogy: About Schmidt (1996), Schmidt Delivered (2000) and Schmidt Steps Back (2012). Begley was born Ludwik Begleiter in Stryi, then part of the Polish Republic and now in Ukraine, the only child of a physician.

A mesmerizing novel of deception and betrayal from the acclaimed author of Wartime Lies and About Schmidt. John North, a prize-winning American writer, is suddenly beset by dark suspicions about the real value of his work.

Overworked to the point of caricature: Like Woody Allen, Begley (Mistler’s Exit, 1998, et. sets his scenes largely by dropping names (here a party at the New Yorker, there an appearance on Apostrophes), but his characters never become credible in their own right. The story ends up feeling stagy and faked.

A mesmerizing novel of deception and betrayal from the acclaimed author of Wartime Lies and About Schmidt.John North, a prize-winning American writer, is suddenly beset by dark suspicions about the real value of his work. Over endless hours and bottles of whiskey consumed in a mysterious café called L’Entre Deux Mondes, he recounts, in counterpoint to his doubts, the one story he has never told before, perhaps the only important one he will ever tell. North’s chosen interlocutor–who could be his doppelgänger–is transfixed by the revelations and becomes the narrator of North’s tale. North has always been faithful to his wife, Lydia, but when one of his novels achieves a special success, he allows himself a dalliance with Léa, a starstruck young journalist. Coolly planning to make sure that his life with Lydia will not be disturbed, North is taken off guard when Léa becomes obsessed with him and he with her elaborate erotic games. As the hypnotic and serpentine confession unfurls, we gradually discover the extraordinary lengths to which North has gone to indulge a powerful desire for self-destruction. Shipwreck is a daring parable of the contradictory impulses that can rend a single soul–narcissism and self-loathing, refinement and lust.
Xal
This is yet another of of Begley's adultery, I won't get caught, man sneaks out on wife, stories. The twist here is that the girl friend gets caught bad, I mean bad. It's annoying that the protagonist is always saying that this girl will do anything, without alluding to what that might be. One wonders if he knowns stuff beyond the missionary possition. Anyway the characters are much more unidimensionable than in any of his other books so if you have to miss one of Begley's miss this one. Unless tricking the girl into taking the punishment amuses you.
Uttegirazu
I enjoy Mr. Begley's work and find his clever and easy to read, if sometimes lacking the depth of some other authors that I enjoy. This was certainly up to par and, frankly, one his better works with a 'did not see that coming' ending. It was a very worthy read for Begley fans and anyone looking for an entertaining read.
Dagdarad
Very odd presentation of the story, as it is told to a stranger the protagonist meets in a bar. Lots of complex twists and turns to keep one engaged.
Malodred
The sex gets monotonous. The first person narrative, as well.
Detenta
self indulgent and somewhat silly- didn't finish it
Kuve
I think I'm going to enjoy writing about Louis Begley's 'Shipwreck' more than I enjoyed reading it. Probably a lot more. There's so many ways to describe why I was so disappointed in this book.

The main character, and essentially the narrator of the story (though it's told through the filter of a mostly-silent third party), is John North. North is a published author of several novels of critical success and a faithful, loving husband to Lydia. Faithful, that is, until he meets young journalist Lea and begins an affair with her.

The disappointing part was that this had potential to be a good story - potential that went unrealized for the most part. 'Shipwreck' has a good ending, I will give it that, but getting there is simply a chore, and the payoff isn't worth the extra effort.

The story is basically a character study, but the main problem is that John North isn't an interesting enough character to merit a study of such length. North is neurotic and arrogant and prissy, which would all be fine if he had something interesting to say - but he doesn't. He questions and doubts and bends over backwards trying to gaze into his own navel constantly. His neuroses infect every aspect of the story and his passions are as tepid as the coffee you forgot to drink earlier this morning.

North cannot seem to say something straight out - he wanders from point to point as he tells his tale, bouncing off tangential stories often. This reminded me of the wanderings of Jose Saramago, who often rambles on as well. The sharp contrast is that Saramago wanders into flights of fancy and imagination crafted in language that makes you want to weep, while North, in Begley's hands, rambles deeper and deeper into the mundane. One makes the tangents worth reading on their own merit, the other makes them feel like roadblocks to the story.

There's nothing special about the craft of 'Shipwreck' either. The language is nothing to brag about and the story structure in linear and predictable. I suspected the ending would be at least a high point of the book, and I was at least right in that, but as I say, getting there was much, much harder than it needed to be.

Comparisons leap to mind. If 'Shipwreck' was a piece of music it would be most likely heard in an elevator, unobtrusive background noise played through tinny speakers. If it were a meal it would be vaguely satisfying but bland, something slightly greasy purchased at a drive-up window. If it were a razor blade it would be dull from use and irritating on the skin. If it were a painting it would be something seen on the wall of a hotel room - flat colors depicting a generic landscape, something safe and unoffensive.

There are better books along these lines - Susan Minot's 'Rapture,' for example, is a much more engaging story and told very thoughtfully, and actually expresses real passion and emotion without overplaying it. Put simply, 'Shipwreck' looked to be a story about hidden passions and life-changing decisions, but instead was an examination an uninteresting, neurotic, and ultimately cowardly character.

And yes, writing about it was far more fun than reading it.
crazy mashine
Just as he did in his 1996 novel, About Schmidt, Begley here provides another character study of a middle-aged man who doubts his success and questions his good fortune. John North, like Schmidt, faces a crisis of conscience, questioning every aspect of his life while trying to avoid the messy consequences of his betrayal of his wife and his marriage. In this elegantly written novel, Begley presents North as a New York writer whose novels have won prizes, but who has endangered all he values in life by succumbing to the sexually voracious appetites of Lea Morini, a French journalist who has interviewed him for the Paris Vogue magazine. Totally committed to preserving his marriage, North also believes that he can continue his relationship with Lea because adultery is wrong "only if it is discovered."
In a bar called, L'Entre Deux Mondes, a "place between two worlds," or no-man's-land, North tells the story of his dalliance with Lea to his alter-ego, a "man so like me in appearance and demeanor." Hypersensitive to nuances and observant of the smallest details, however dense he may be about his personal life, North gives insights into the creative process which ring with truth, however much he may rationalize and temporize about his emotional weaknesses. His satirical comments about literary awards, the juries which determine the prizes, and the play-acting which accompanies the prize announcements provide a sense of realism.
Although North leads his companion (along with the reader) to think that he succeeds in solving the problem of Lea in the end, the reader cannot be sure that this is really the case, or that the concluding plot twist is truthful. North, the writer, believes that it is "a colossal mistake" to tell his story, as he has been doing, when he could be writing it. "That is how I could give it a proper conclusion," he tells us. The writer succeeds by "inventing: erasing what's inconvenient and bringing in whatever is useful and getting rid of what is improbable," he explains. The irony, of course, is that in the end, the story of North, Lydia, and Lea IS written and the reader has just read it. One can only wonder how much of the "inconvenient" has been "erased" here, either by Begley or by North, so that the dilemma of Lea can be resolved--if it is resolved. Mary Whipple

e-Books related to Shipwreck