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» » Collins Scottish Place Names (Scots Gaelic Edition)
Collins Scottish Place Names (Scots Gaelic Edition) e-book

Language:

Scots Gaelic

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

British & Irish

ePub size:

1428 kb

Other formats:

docx mobi mbr rtf

Rating:

4.1

Publisher:

Collins (March 5, 2009)

Pages:

192

ISBN:

0007299478

Collins Scottish Place Names (Scots Gaelic Edition) e-book


The following place names are either derived from Scottish Gaelic or have standard Gaelic equivalents: The southern South Island of New Zealand was settled by the Free Church of Scotland.

The following place names are either derived from Scottish Gaelic or have standard Gaelic equivalents: The southern South Island of New Zealand was settled by the Free Church of Scotland, and many of its placenames are of Scottish Gaelic origin (including some directly named for places in Scotland): Lake Aviemore – an Aghaidh Mhòr. Balclutha – Baile Chluaidh. Lake Benmore – Beinn Mhor. Clutha River – Cluaidh. Dunedin – Dùn Èideann. Inch Clutha – Innis Chluaidh.

In some cases, the equivalent can be a cognate, in other cases it may be an Anglicised spelling derived from the Gaelic name, or in other cases it can be an etymologically unrelated name.

This page is a list of place names in Scotland which have subsequently been applied to other parts of the world by Scottish emigrants or explorers, or contain distinctive Scottish surnames as an element. Ailsa Craig (South Orkney Islands). Dundee Island and Firth of Tay. Inverleith Harbour. McDonald Ice Rumples. McMurdo Sound, McMurdo Ice Shelf and McMurdo Station. MacKenzie Bay. Mount Campbell. Mount Crawford (Antarctica). Mount Douglas (Antarctica).

First names are either native or nativized (. borrowed and made to fit the Gaelic sound system). Surnames are generally patronymic, . they refer to a historical ancestor

First names are either native or nativized (. they refer to a historical ancestor. The form of a surname varies according to whether its bearer is male (. MacDhòmhnaill "MacDonald") or female (.

This is a list of English words borrowed from Scottish Gaelic. Some of these are common in Scottish English and Scots but less so in other varieties of English. The word's earliest appearance in English is in 15th century Scotland with the meaning "vagabond minstrel". The modern literary meaning, which began in the 17th century, is heavily influenced by the presence of the word in ancient Greek (bardos) and ancient Latin (bardus) writings (.

Start reading Scottish Placenames (Waverley Scottish Classics) on your Kindle in under a minute. This book is helpful as a reference tool, but not as interesting as I'd hoped, It is a list of place names and brief explanations of their meaning, but doesn't provide anything beyond that, such as regional influences or general historical background.

Scottish Place Names - Maggie Scott. ww. cotsdictionaries. This book takes a look at a variety of Scots terms that have been used to describe Scotland’s hills, valleys, rivers, settlements and streets.

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DOUGAL m Scottish, Irish Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Dubhghall, which meant "dark . KEITH m English, Scottish From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from a place name, itself probably derived from the Brythonic element cet meaning "wood".

DOUGAL m Scottish, Irish Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Dubhghall, which meant "dark stranger" from dubh "dark" and gall "stranger". DOUGLAS m Scottish, English Anglicized form of the Scottish surname Dubhghlas, meaning "dark river" from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river" (an archaic word related to glas "grey, green"). This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.

An entertaining and informative guide to the places of Scotland and the traditions associated with them. Scotland is home to some truly fantastic place names: archetypally Celtic names like Auchtermuchty, Kirkintilloch, and Drumnadrochit; romantic names such as Skye and Iona; popular first names like Lewis, Angus, and Kyle; and international exports such as Perth and Hamilton. This entertaining and informative book explains the meanings of over 800 Scottish places, including towns and cities, mountains and hills, lochs and rivers, and also covers the history and traditions of each place. In the course of the book, the author takes us on a fascinating journey of many languages and cultures, of incomers and invaders, of religion and battles, and of quite a few steep hills.

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