ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » Paris Trance: A Romance
Paris Trance: A Romance e-book

Author:

Geoff Dyer

Language:

English

Category:

Fiction

Subcategory:

British & Irish

ePub size:

1132 kb

Other formats:

doc azw docx mbr

Rating:

4.9

Publisher:

North Point Press; First Edition edition (May 15, 2000)

Pages:

272

ISBN:

0865476004

Paris Trance: A Romance e-book

by Geoff Dyer


In this book, Geoff Dyer fixes a dream of happiness-and its aftermath-with photographic precision

In this book, Geoff Dyer fixes a dream of happiness-and its aftermath-with photographic precision. Boldly erotic and hauntingly elegiac, comic and romantic, Paris Trance confirms Dyer as one of England's most original and talented writers. People talk about love at first sight, about the way that men and women fall for each other immediately, but there is also such a thing as friendship at first sight. But when he arrives, he quickly realizes the city, and his life there, aren't what he imagined.

Geoff Dyer's Paris Trance is full of these ingredients. Luke and Alex are Englishmen living in Paris, spending their days packing books in a warehouse and spending their free time playing football and quoting sections of dialogue from Blade Runner. Soon they hook up with their respective mates-Luke with Nicole, Alex with Sahra-and proceed to party heavily.

Электронная книга "Paris Trance: A Romance", Geoff Dyer

Электронная книга "Paris Trance: A Romance", Geoff Dyer. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Paris Trance: A Romance" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

A skilfully crafted map of the human heart.

In Paris Trance, Geoff Dyer fixes a dream of happiness-and its aftermath-with photographic precision. Boldly erotic and hauntingly elegiac, comic and romantic, this brilliant reconception of the classic expatriate novels of the Lost Generation confirms Dyer as one of our most original and talented writers.

In this book, Geoff Dyer fixes a dream of happiness-and its aftermath-with photographic precision

In this book, Geoff Dyer fixes a dream of happiness-and its aftermath-with photographic precision. An interesting exploration of what it means to be happy, and what it is to seek happiness. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. English music- and literary-critic Dyer (Out of Sheer Rage, 1998, et. offers his first novel-a disappointing improvisation on the Parisian themes of Hemingway and Fitzgerald. Not so many years ago.

Geoff Dyer is the author of four novels and eight non-fiction books. Dyer has won the Somerset Maugham Prize, the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for Comic Fiction, a National Book Critics Circle Award, a Lannan Literary Award, the International Centre of Photography’s 2006 Infinity Award for writing on photography and the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ E. M. Forster Award. 14 High Street, Edinburgh EH1 1TE. ww. anongate. The moral right of the author has been asserted. First published in Great Britain in 1998 by Abacus, an imprint of Little, Brown Book Group, 100 Victoria Embankment, London EC4Y 0DY.

Recipe for a millennial novel about twentysomethings living abroad: Take two couples and combine with equal parts desperation and languid slacking. Luke moves to Paris and, with his new love and the other expatriate couple from whom they become inseparable, wanders the Eleventh Arrondissement where clubs, cafes, banter, and ecstasy now occupy Gertrude Stein's city "which is not real but is really there. In "Paris Trance," Geoff Dyer fixes a dream of happiness-and its aftermath-with photographic precision. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. When Luke came to Paris with the intention of writing a book based on his experiences of living – as he grandly and naïvely conceived it – ‘in exile’, he was twenty-six years old (‘a fine age for a man,’ according to Scott Fitzgerald).

item 1 Paris Trance: A Romance by Dyer, Geoff Book The Cheap Fast Free Post -Paris Trance: A Romance . Geoff Dyer is the author of Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi and three previous novels, as well as nine non-fiction books.

item 1 Paris Trance: A Romance by Dyer, Geoff Book The Cheap Fast Free Post -Paris Trance: A Romance by Dyer, Geoff Book The Cheap Fast Free Post. Dyer has won the Somerset Maugham Prize, the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for Comic Fiction, a Lannan Literary Award, the International Center of Photography's 2006 Infinity Award for writing on photography and the American Academy of Arts and Letters' . In 2009 he was named GQ's Writer of the Year.

Luke moves to Paris and, with his new love and the other expatriate couple from whom they become inseparable, wanders the Eleventh Arrondissement where clubs, cafés, banter, and ecstasy now occupy Gertrude Stein's city "which is not real but is really there."In Paris Trance, Geoff Dyer fixes a dream of happiness--and its aftermath--with photographic precision. Boldly erotic and hauntingly elegiac, comic and romantic, this brilliant reconception of the classic expatriate novels of the Lost Generation confirms Dyer as one of our most original and talented writers.
Fohuginn
I loved the way the plot was set up and it really made you curious about what would happen next. But then, there was a plot development that I completely saw coming and that was it for me. I won't ruin it for other readers by revealing what happens, but I was so frustrated at the novel's predictability that I dropped it and read something else.
Fawrindhga
Dyer is a great essayist. On the evidence of this book, he is not a great novelist. What I thought profound, insightful and funny in wonderful prose in his non-fiction, is here tedious, vapid and pedestrian. I'll try another novel, but this was most off-putting. A pity.
Beabandis
and mordant observation. One reviewer here calls Paris Trance a tale of misspent youth; I wonder how she spent hers. Sensory pleasures, love, a season in the sun, one summer per customer: surely these are wise, extravagant returns on one's youth?
Globus
Inspiring writing as per Geoff Dyer
Siralune
I bought this book on the recommendation of a friend, a fan of Dyer's, particularly of a book entitled "The Colour of Memory", which is about artists and punks hanging around in Brixton, London. Apparently Dyer grew up there - a kid from a tough neighborhood who became a literary success. I wanted to like this book and was anticipating that I would, and even went out and bought another one of his books before finishing this one. This story concerns two young couples, in love, in their twenties, and in Paris - all experiences I can relate to. I was all prepared to like it --but I didn't.

This dull parade of insignificant scenes tries to show the ordinariness of love, the way that it just happens as a part of everyday occurrences - but instead it comes across like somebody describing their weekend to you. If a writer tries to hide the extraordinary within the ordinary, hoping for some sort of subtle lifelike experience, he risks presenting the reader with only the ordinary. And if a story is going to march along in that fashion, than it should have interesting characters. Alas this one does not. The two girlfriends in the story, Sahra and Nicole, are so similar, and similarly uninteresting, that I frequently got them mixed up before realizing that it did not matter anyway. The story is told by one of the two English guys, Alex, although you don't realize that he is the narrator until the end. There is no real reason for this, other than just to be clever.

The main focus of the story is Luke, and he is presented as some sort of tragically romantic figure, a man so committed to living and loving in the moment that life eventually passes him by, and he ends up barely living at all. He comes to Paris to write a novel, but writes nothing. Instead he works in a warehouse and develops a social life and a love life with Nicole. This "romantic readiness" (to borrow a phrase that described Gatsby) is ultimately his weakness. The two couples party together, go to clubs, eat, take ecstasy, spend weekends in the country. There is a fistfight with a French right-winger. There is a fight between the two lovers. And none of it is very interesting.

This has moments of fine writing, of interesting thoughts and lively descriptions. It has the taco chip quality that many other writers today (such as Murakami) have; the scenes flow by smoothly and one wants to keep reading. But as much as I wanted to, I could not really get into it, and I only read to the end because I wanted to know how Dyer would close up the story.
*Nameless*
Geoff Dyer's other books are mostly unclassifiable meditations on jazz (But Beautiful), the fascination of war (The Missing of the Somme) and the fear of failure (Out of Sheer Rage). His infrequent novels are pretty good, though. Paris Trance is about falling in love - I actually typed "failling" by mistake, but it was serendipity, because it's also about failing in love. Luke, the hero, is admired by the narrator Alex in much the same way that Fitzgerald's Gatsby is admired by Nick Carraway. (Hmmm, my name is Alex and my brother's name is Nick. Odd that.) What Luke is after, or thinks he's after, is a dream of perfection, and it's only when he achieves it that he lets it go. Drift is the order of Luke's universe. There's a terribly sad episode about half way through when Alex pays Luke a visit in the present (most of the book is a vast, quasi-nostalgic flashback) and speculates to himself about the loneliness of Luke's life; lines from that part have followed me around for months.
Some of the dialogue is uncomfortably Hip; there's some rather too-easy pop-culture riffing, inspired according to Dyer by his admiration for Don DeLillo's way with dialogue. But the book has the same sort of deeper ambiguities as "Gatsby"; Alex writes the book as part of a struggle with himself between his creeping discomfort with his own ordinariness and Luke's tragic appetite for living such grand abstractions as Destiny and Bliss. The sheen of the prose, when describing events like the characters walking through a French field high on acid, has the poignant lustre of remembered happiness. (Dyer's first novel was called The Colour of Memory and is, I think, quite a bit better than this one.)
I don't know if Dyer is a natural novelist and he isn't too sure himself. But Paris Trance is a beautiful book, if it isn't this writer at his best. And it has some wonderful bits: a spoof re-enactment of "Brief Encounter", brilliant accounts of what it's like to go to a pub in a foreign city and a couple of great sex scenes. His non-fiction is maybe more intellectually electric but his fiction is a quieter pleasure.
Five stars, not because I think the book is a flat-out masterpiece but because he's a fantastic writer and I wanted to bring the average up.
Fordg
If I could give this piece of trash negative stars, I would. Aside from the boring, overly pedantic pace of things, the main character kills his dog and puts it in a garbage bag. I did not finish reading this author's attempt and subsequent failure at writing a thought-provoking, sophisticated piece of prose. If you're looking for a book that makes you think or challenges you, this is not it. I literally threw this book into the rubbish bin where it belongs.

e-Books related to Paris Trance: A Romance