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» » Nightshade (The New Doctor Who Adventures)
Nightshade (The New Doctor Who Adventures) e-book

Author:

Mark Gatiss

Language:

English

Category:

Fantasy

Subcategory:

Science Fiction

ePub size:

1158 kb

Other formats:

txt docx doc azw

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

London Bridge (October 1, 1992)

Pages:

240

ISBN:

0426203763

Nightshade (The New Doctor Who Adventures) e-book

by Mark Gatiss


Doctor Who: Nightshade by Mark Gatiss was an incredibly dark adventure with a most beloved character (in a version I'm entirely unfamiliar with) and his companion (again I have no history with Ace).

Doctor Who: Nightshade by Mark Gatiss was an incredibly dark adventure with a most beloved character (in a version I'm entirely unfamiliar with) and his companion (again I have no history with Ace). Centered around a small village, The Doctor and Ace are up against a foe that is ruthless in its carnage and hunger. NIGHTSHADE is quite a fun romp. The book is a bit cliched and predictable in places, but such a solid adventure that it's quite easy to excuse its flaws and simply appreciate it for the enjoyable escapade that it is. The characters are very well drawn and the setting fits perfectly with the story that's being told.

Nightshade is an original novel written by Mark Gatiss and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It features the Seventh Doctor and Ace. A prelude to the novel, also penned by Gatiss, appeared in Doctor Who Magazine The year is 1968, and as the BBC rebroadcasts episodes of the classic SF serial "Nightshade", the townsfolk of Crook Marsham prepare for a lonely Christmas

Given his accomplishments as a Doctor Who author, screenwriter, audio writer, audio actor, screen actor, documentary narrator, and documentary subject, his contribution to the Doctor Who franchise is unique.

Written by Mark Gatiss, Nightshade is the eighth instalment in the series of Virgin Publishing's Doctor Who paperback novels. A New Adventure, it features the Seventh Doctor and Ace. "I have done enough!". Ace has never known the Doctor so withdrawn and melancholic. He is avoiding her company, seeking solace in the forgotten rooms and labyrinthine passages of his ancient time machine.

Doctor Who: Nightshade. Virgin New Adventures by. Mark Gatiss.

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Doctor Who New Adventures 55 - Damaged Goods (Russell T Davies) (v. ) abbyy. Doctor Who New Adventures 08 - Nightshade (Mark Gatiss) daisy. Doctor Who New Adventures 09 - Love and War (Paul Cornell) daisy. Doctor Who New Adventures 10 - Transit (Ben Aaronovitch) daisy. Doctor Who New Adventures 11 - The Highest Science (Gareth Roberts) (v. ) daisy. Doctor Who New Adventures 12 - The Pit (Neil Penswick) (v. Doctor Who New Adventures 13 - Deceit (Peter Darvill-Evans) (v.

Doctor Who: The New Adventures (7th Doctor) (60 books items). TheUmbrellaMan voted for an image 1 year, 8 months ago. Explore Content.

The Doctor and Ace end up in the village of Crook Marsham in 1968. The Doctor contemplates retiring and Ace falls in love with local boy Robin Yeadon. in a nearby retirement home, Edmund Trevithick, who once played the fictional character known as Professor Nightshade in the BBC t.v series of the same title, begins to see other fictional characters from the program as if they were real. The Doctor realizes that Crook Marsham has had many unexplained deaths throughout history. The villagers are then plagued by appearances of lost loved ones.
Uaoteowi
I've been a fan of Mr. Gatiss's writing in the past, but this time around he takes my favorite Doctor Who pair out for a spin and writes literary gold! Okay...that might be a bit much, but you'll love the twists this tale will take you on; I guarantee it!
Axebourne
This is one of the best Doctor Who novels ever written. It's tightly written and superbly paced. The characters are crafted well, and the baddies are - well, the baddest. It is a genuine atmosphere story if there ever was one. Read this, and you will get the heebie-jeebies. It's fantastic.
Mmsa
Doctor Who: Nightshade by Mark Gatiss was an incredibly dark adventure with a most beloved character (in a version I'm entirely unfamiliar with) and his companion (again I have no history with Ace). Centered around a small village, The Doctor and Ace are up against a foe that is ruthless in its carnage and hunger. An entity that reveals itself in the form of loved ones long since dead and buried, it seems nigh on impossible that there is a way to stop its growing into a creature that can devour the planet in its entirety. However, lifelong lovers of the Time Lord with a made up name know that he's nothing if not persistent. I warn you that this book is firmly in the horror genre rather than specifically sci-fi so keep that in mind if you're looking to read it.
Fek
NIGHTSHADE is quite a fun romp. The book is a bit cliched and predictable in places, but such a solid adventure that it's quite easy to excuse its flaws and simply appreciate it for the enjoyable escapade that it is. The characters are very well drawn and the setting fits perfectly with the story that's being told. If you're in the right mood for this sort of thing, then you'll find it to be a complete delight.
There are quite a number of Doctor Who cliches present throughout the story. Thankfully, Mark Gatiss has the good sense to set up many of them slightly differently than we're used to, so that the majority are not particularly annoying. Still there are moments of predictability and a few sections suffer because of their lack of originality. The ending in particular is a bit of a disappointment, as it feels jerky and uneven after the smooth and slow build-up. On the other hand, the beginning and middle sections feel deceptively comfortable and safe, which would most likely be a deliberate ploy, given the theme running through the story that highlights the dangers of nostalgia. Those who dwell too much on the past will be doomed to have no future (by having their souls eaten by loud, slobbering nostalgia-monsters, one presumes). Although the theme is hit a bit too loudly at a few points, for the most part it makes a nice backdrop.
The town and the characters that inhabit it are fairly stereotypical of the average sleepy English village, but for what the story was attempting, they work perfectly. Despite the relatively large number of people mentioned, most of them are given enough brushstrokes to seem realistic. The back-stories provided are quite effective and excellent at showing how the past continues to live on in the present. There are several nice touches that subtly demonstrate the link between then and now that thankfully manage to stop well short of beating us over the head with the imagery. The retirement home, the graveyard, the old semi-abandoned church, and the monastery are all quite successful at establishing this. And, of course, the most blatant reminder of one's past comes in the form of the TV serial, Nightshade, and the actor who portrayed the title character.
Fortunately, Mark Gatiss chose to use Quatermass as the basis for his television nostalgia-fest rather than the Doctor Who television show itself, thus sparing us from a lot of silly fandom in-jokes (the Professor X gags would come from elsewhere and become less funny with each passing reference). The sections featuring Edward Trevithick, the actor who had played Professor Nightshade, are far and away the best parts of the book. Gatiss obviously had a great affection for this character. He gets the most interesting background, his part of the story is the most exciting, and he certainly is the character with the most depth.
NIGHTSHADE isn't the best Doctor Who story out there, but it certainly one of the more enjoyable ones. For a fairly standard story it packs a surprising amount of subtlety. The nostalgia theme is done well and is not overused. It's certainly an entertaining tale that manages to rise above the comfortable runaround status that it could so easily have fallen into. Rereading this book in 2002 means that it seems much more light than it did ten years ago (or even eight years ago when I read it the first time) given all that has happened in the Doctor Who novels since NIGHTSHADE's publication, but it still manages to pass the test of time.
Wat!?
England, 1968, and Edmund Trevithick is a retired actor, best known for his lead role in the science fantasy series, 'Nightshade'. The days of fighting imaginary monsters are long gone, and Edmund has settled down in a sleepy village. And then the Doctor and Ace arrive, the lines between fact and fiction get blurred, and Trevithick finds that 'Nightshade' is more like nightmare...
The publishers of Doctor Who novels finally realised that there was really nothing to their story arcs (Timewyrm and Cat's Crucible) that really warranted having them, and so a new era of more-or-less stand alone novels kicked off with this one - and a very good choice too, its an absolute corker!
Mark Gatiss has gone on from this to not only write a number of very good Doctor Who novels, but to co-author and star in the wonderful 'League of Gentlemen' series and, indeed, play the Doctor himself.
This novel is often wonderfully understated and gets deeply into the emotions of the characters, which is quite important to make the science fiction-horror elements come to life.
Hey, stop reading this review and order it!
Ieslyaenn
This one set the bar for Who novels. Written in 1992, it still is the ultimate Who book. Read this book and be scared, sad, and disturbed. The Doctor's behavior in the last few pages is sad and says a lot about who he is as a person. If you read any Who book, read this one!

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