ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » All the Traps of Earth
All the Traps of Earth e-book

Author:

Clifford D. Simak

Language:

English

Category:

Fantasy

Subcategory:

Science Fiction

ePub size:

1289 kb

Other formats:

mobi rtf lrf mbr

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

Avon Books (August 1, 1979)

ISBN:

0380455005

All the Traps of Earth e-book

by Clifford D. Simak


6 Books about Clifford D. Simak. 7 Biographical sources. Simak's robot-awareness theme goes farthest in All the Traps of Earth

6 Books about Clifford D. Simak's robot-awareness theme goes farthest in All the Traps of Earth. A 600-year-old robot, a family retainer who earned the name Richard Daniel, is considered chattel to be reprogrammed and lose all its memories. The robot runs away, hitches onto a spaceship, and passes through hyperspace unprotected.

Clifford D. Simak bibliography. Only one man, a "sinner" who can read books, will risk his life to complete the mission. Other Worlds of Clifford Simak (1962) Abridgment of The Worlds of Clifford Simak (1961). Contains "Dusty Zebra", "Carbon Copy", "Founding Father", "Idiot's Crusade", "Death Scene" and "Green Thumb".

A runaway robot gains the ability to telekinetically fix any problem, yet can't fix his own problem: the need to be needed. All the Traps of Earth. The inventory list was long. And having done that, his job came to an end. He shoved back the chair and rose from the desk and slowly walked across the living room, with all its clutter of possessions from the family's past.

Nine additional tales showcase Clifford D. Simak’s talent for spinning stories that allow us to glimpse the possibilities of life beyond Earth as well as expand our wisdom of what it means to be human

Ten stories of wonder and imagination by an author named Grand Master by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Nine additional tales showcase Clifford D. Simak’s talent for spinning stories that allow us to glimpse the possibilities of life beyond Earth as well as expand our wisdom of what it means to be human.

Clifford Simak began publishing stories in the early 1930s and continued to write for 50 years. While writing short stories and novels in several genres, he kept his day job as a daily newspaperman in Minneapolis

Clifford Simak began publishing stories in the early 1930s and continued to write for 50 years. While writing short stories and novels in several genres, he kept his day job as a daily newspaperman in Minneapolis. He wrote two great novels, City and Way Station, but his real strength, I think, was short fiction. As a working journalist he was trained to write clean, efficient, transparent prose, and we find those Simak, Clifford D. All the Traps of Earth and Other Stories. Clifford Simak began publishing stories in the early 1930s and continued to write for 50 years.

There are several books by Clifford D. Simak titled All the Traps of Earth (1962). Let us look at the beginnings of several of the stories in this collection

There are several books by Clifford D. But not all of them are complete. Some might be more accurately titled "Stories From All the Traps of Earth ". Let us look at the beginnings of several of the stories in this collection. Because he is legally "property," his memory will be erased and replaced by another robot personality.

Download books for free. EPUB FB2 PDF MOBI RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

All the Traps of Earth. Author: Clifford Simak. Publisher: Fantasy & Science Fiction, March 1960, 1960. A runaway robot gains the ability to telekinetically fix any problem, yet can’t fix his own problem: the need to be needed. Most Simak fans have heard that Cliff’s first sale was a story called The Cubes of Ganymede, which was apparently accepted by Amazing Stories and held for several years before being returned with a note indicating that it no longer met the magazine’s needs. Clifford D. Simak: Grand Master Indeed! Music that had the whisper of rockets and the quietness of the void and the somber arches of eternal night. Cliff, who by then had sold a number of other stories, apparently did not attempt to resubmit Cubes anywhere else, and at some unknown time thereafter it vanished from the author’s files.

Vintage paperback
Barit
Classic sci-fi writing from the 1950s and 1960s, this is a collection of short stories that make you think about humanity and human acts. I won't detail (or spoil) the stories as other reviewers have already done so. Rather I will state that there's something optimistic about reading these from a time that was filled with mixed emotions of optimism and pessimism as we entered the nuclear age and the cold war. Somehow Simak's stories have survived the ravages of time and make excellent reading, along the lines of the classic "twilight zone" genre.
Zepavitta
Various stories by one of the most incredible Science Fiction Writers of the 20th Century. His stories are so well written they bring you into them as an observer and always end on a surprising and generally up note.
Saintrius
Some of Simak's best work......Just think of a bit of Ray Bradbury with a touch of Lester Del Rey.
Kulwes
Perhaps it would be best to start with a few observations about the version of this collection that I am reviewing. There are several books by Clifford D. Simak titled _All the Traps of Earth_ (1962). But not all of them are complete. Some might be more accurately titled "Stories From _All the Traps of Earth_". I am reviewing the original, complete version (the Doubleday hardback or the Avon paperback) consisting of nine (count 'em, 9) stories. The title story was originally published in _Fantasy and Science Fiction_ in 1960. The remaining eight tales all came from _Galaxy_ between 1951 and 1960. All of the stories range in quality from good to excellent.

I believe that it was Alfred Bester who first pointed out that one of the virtues of a Simak story is its _unpredictability_. Usually, it is hard to look at the beginning of a Simak story and accurately predict exactly how it will end. There are usually zigs and zags, twists and turns, and unexpected angles before the stories are all logically resolved. Mind you, the resolutions are solidly connected to the beginnings. But they are not _predictable_ from the beginning.

Let us look at the beginnings of several of the stories in this collection. In "All the Traps of Earth," a robot who is the last member of the aristocratic Barrington family is closing up the family accounts. Because he is legally "property," his memory will be erased and replaced by another robot personality. In "Good Night, Mr. James," a man named Henderson James wakes up on a hillside on Earth packing a gun and has a mission to fulfill that he cannot remember. What is it? In "The Sitters," a high school principal patiently listens as his coach bewails the loss of his star football players. It couldn't be really important... Could it? In "Project Mastodon," we see a man talking to the Secretary of State. The man claims to be a representative from the country of Mastodonia. And here is the opening to "Crying Jag" verbatim:

It was Saturday evening and I was working up a jag. I had my jug beside me, handy, and I was feeling good and fixing to feel better, when this alien and his robot came tramping up the driveway. (163)

Engaging openings every one. But I'll bet that even armed with the information that I have given you, you will not be able to see where Simak is going with these stories the first time that you read them. But sharp-eyed readers may have noticed my earlier qualifier of "usually". One story, "Condition of Employment," is shorter, much less elaborately plotted, and a touch more predictable. It's not a bad story-- simplicity is not always a vice in fiction-- but it doesn't have quite the dazzle of most of the other tales.

In case you haven't guessed by this time, I am a great lover of Simak's fiction. This is one of his best collections.
nadness
Wonderful stories, all nine. In Simak's typical fashion, they mix a sense of rural/suburban hominess with the alien and cosmically vast. Roughly half end on a happy or hopeful note, while the rest are blackly humorous or outright horror. Oddly enough, even these latter manage to retain the "homey" feel, something which few authors indeed could infuse into a dark short story (without making a mess of things, anyway). My favorite tale is "No Life of Their Own," about a boy on a Wisconsin farm, his alien neighbors and a race of wispy personality parasites that give good luck to one at the cost of bad luck for everyone else.

e-Books related to All the Traps of Earth