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» » Best of Walter M.Miller Jnr., The
Best of Walter M.Miller Jnr., The e-book

Author:

Walter M. Miller

Language:

English

Category:

Fantasy

Subcategory:

Science Fiction

ePub size:

1617 kb

Other formats:

mobi doc rtf lrf

Rating:

4.6

Publisher:

Gollancz; Collectors Edition edition (2000)

Pages:

478

ISBN:

0575071192

Best of Walter M.Miller Jnr., The e-book

by Walter M. Miller


The best stories of Walter M. Miller, J.

The best stories of Walter M. Miller, Jr. Contents: You Triflin' Skunk!; The Will; Anybody Else Like Me? . Standout stories include Dark Benediction,Anyone Else Like Me,The Lineman and The Will. My personal favourite was Conditionally Human. The stories show their age when it comes to the sometimes poorly written It's pretty amazing reading this collection when you realise most of the stories were written between 1951 and 1954.

Walter Michael Miller Jr. (January 23, 1923 – January 9, 1996) was an American science fiction writer. He is known primarily for A Canticle for Leibowitz (1959), the only novel he published in his lifetime. Prior to its publication, he was a writer of short stories. Miller was born in New Smyrna Beach, Florida. Educated at the University of Tennessee and the University of Texas, he worked as an engineer.

Walter Miller is most famous for his sole successful novel "Canticle for Leibowitz" a complicated, fascinating .

Walter Miller is most famous for his sole successful novel "Canticle for Leibowitz" a complicated, fascinating, apocalyptic story of after the Age of Simplification. He also wrote numerous short stories published in the various science fiction short magazines of the 1950's through the 1990's. The stories are rather dark and many are also apocalyptic. They have intriguing twists of plot and do vary considerably in plot, characters, eras to be each individually interesting.

Another Original publication of POCKET BOOKS POCISET BOOKS, a Simon & Schuster division of GULF .

Another Original publication of POCKET BOOKS POCISET BOOKS, a Simon & Schuster division of GULF & WESTERN CORPORATION 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, . For information address Pocket Books, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, .

Walter M. Miller Jr is best remembered as the author of A Canticle for Leibowitz, universally recognized as one of the greatest novels of modern SF. But as well as writing that deeply felt and eloquent book. But as well as writing that deeply felt and eloquent book, he produced many shorter works of fiction of stunning originality and power

The Best of Walter M. Walter M. Miller Jr.

The Best of Walter M. 6 Mb. #2.

For information address Pocket Books, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, . First Pocket Books printing May, 1980. But as well as writing that deeply felt and eloquent book, he produced many shorter works of fiction of stunning originality and power. But as well as writing that deeply felt and eloquent book, he produced many shorter works of fiction of stunning originality and power

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Nuadador
Walter Miller is most famous for his sole successful novel "Canticle for Leibowitz" a complicated, fascinating, apocalyptic story of after the Age of Simplification. He also wrote numerous short stories published in the various science fiction short magazines of the 1950's through the 1990's. The stories are rather dark and many are also apocalyptic. They have intriguing twists of plot and do vary considerably in plot, characters, eras to be each individually interesting.

Miller's writes very well, moving the reader into the action well. The science is not too advanced for the average reader. Many of the stories have to do with human interaction and reaction to futuristic machines and situations. The book is similar to Clark's "I Robot" just not quite of the epic dimensions of that book, in that the human interactions with the machines are well documented.

For the reading wanting good short science fiction stories, these are excellent.
misery
As the title suggests, this book collects the best short stories and novellas of Walter Miller, Jr., the '50's science fiction writer best known for the brilliant novel "A Canticle for Leibowitz". Miller isn't overly strong on science, so none of these pieces come off as especially dated by recent discoveries, although it's interesting that so many of the technological innovations Miller foresaw have since been realized, albeit in somewhat different forms. The characterization is about what you'd expect from science fiction stories, and of the novellas, only the hero of "Darfstellar" shows real development. Nor is plotting Miller's great strength - too many of the conclusions seem obvious well before the halfway point. As a group, these stories get their punch from powerful ideas - problems that humankind has never solved, but which are likely to get worse in the future. Although Miller doesn't offer any easy solutions, his stories are intelligent and thought provoking, opening up the kind of dialogue that's necessary if these matters are ever to be settled at all. Also noteworthy are his powerful heroines. The overwhelming force of a mother's love drives the folksy "You Triflin' Skunk" and the darker "Vengeance for Nikolai", while "Anybody Else Like Me?" shows a woman driven to fight for her right to privacy. Another common theme is the question of how we define what it means to be human. Miller attacks this problem biologically in the unusual plague drama of "Dark Benediction" and the more-relevant-than-ever "Conditionally Human", and again in a more technological vein with "I, Dreamer". But while these stories are good enough in their way, Miller is most effective when describing the plight of the common workingman. Whether in conflict with technology that replaces him, or with environments that seem determined to destroy him (or at least impinge upon his freedom of action, as in "Dumb Waiter"), Miller's workingman manages to maintain his essential dignity, continues to care about his fellow man, and holds fast to the basic values that separate him from the machine. The best of these stories is "Crucifixus Etiam", in which earthmen working on the planet Mars must choose between a less miserable present and the chance to return home in the future. Miller makes us feel the hero's pain, his terror, and his longing for home, in a way that makes us wonder whether we would be able to make the harsh choices that he makes. Miller's tales often remind us that the true price of human expansion is the hard labor performed by those who are least likely to be compensated for it, and thus proves that true heroism often consists of just doing an unpleasant task that needs to be done - a lesson we should all try to learn. Miller may not be one of the grandmasters of the genre, but this book should please any fan of mid-twentieth-century science fiction.
Whitebinder
I haven't read A Canticle for Liebowitz or Saint Liebowitz and the Wild Horse Woman. Thus this yellow-jacketed reissue was my first brush with the fiction of Walter M Miller. Here we have 14 stories spread over 472 pages, all written between 1952 and 1957. Possibly because of this some of them seem to exhibit more than a passing resemblance to some of Philip K Dick's early short stories. In fact whether or not you like those early Dick tales will probably determine whether or not you like these. Here we have far-future communities who have returned to a Middle Ages existence coming to terms with a giant computer and its robot guardian, post-apocalyptic stories, evil aliens dealing in human cargo, plays where the entire cast is composed of robots, and the story of a world-wide plague which becomes a thinly-disguised meditation on the implications and consequences of intolerance. None of these tales offers anything new or startlingly original, but then they are over 40 years old. They're also well written delightful examples of fifties' SF. And I'll be reading the Liebowitz books when I get a chance.
Umge
Unique and poetic sci-fi from--in my opinion--one of the best sci-fi writers ever. Don't let the cover scare you away.

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