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» » Ex-Patriots: A Novel (Ex-Heroes)
Ex-Patriots: A Novel (Ex-Heroes) e-book

Author:

Peter Clines

Language:

English

Category:

Fantasy

Subcategory:

Science Fiction

ePub size:

1115 kb

Other formats:

mbr mobi doc docx

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

Broadway Books (April 23, 2013)

Pages:

432

ISBN:

0804136599

Ex-Patriots: A Novel (Ex-Heroes) e-book

by Peter Clines


The second novel in Peter Clines' bestselling Ex series. It's been two years since the plague of ex-humans decimated mankind

The second novel in Peter Clines' bestselling Ex series. It's been two years since the plague of ex-humans decimated mankind. Two years since the superheroes St. George, Cerberus, Zzzap, and Stealth gathered Los Angeles’s survivors.

I absolutely loved Ex-Heroes, the genre-blending book by Peter Clines. Here, the pace noticeably picks up with Ex-Patriots.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. I absolutely loved Ex-Heroes, the genre-blending book by Peter Clines. To sum up the story from the first book, superheroes made a too-brief appearance in the world before it was decimated by a virus that turned humans into the walking dead.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The first novel in Peter Clines' bestselling Ex series.

Peter Clines (31 May 1969), born in Cape Neddick, Maine is an American author and novelist best known for his es series, Ex-Heroes, and Lovecraftian inspired Threshold novels 14 and The Fold

Peter Clines (31 May 1969), born in Cape Neddick, Maine is an American author and novelist best known for his es series, Ex-Heroes, and Lovecraftian inspired Threshold novels 14 and The Fold. Before becoming a full-time writer, Clines worked as a props master in the film industry for 15 years.

Ex-Heroes e-1 (Ex-Heroes Peter Clines. Year Published: 2011. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Year Published: 2012. Year Published: 1991. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

PETER CLINES has published several pieces of short fiction and countless articles on the film and television industries, as well as the novels The Fold, Ex-Heroes, Ex-Patriots, Ex-Communication, Ex-Purgatory, and 14. He lives and writes in southern California. Ex-Communication: A Novel. All of us try to cheat death. I was just better prepared to do it than most folks.

It's been two years since the plague of ex-humans decimated mankind  . To me, this is the closest you can get to a great novel A comic book-esque slobberknocker! The story picks up two years on from the events of the previous book, as the US army arrives at the superheroes base, the Mount. The story centres on the mysterious Project Krypton, which I can’t really talk about in any way for fear of spoiling the story. The previous book, Ex-Heroes was a little too zombie-riffic in my view. This book still features zombies, but does so in a much better and original way.

Author of Ex-Heroes, Ex-Patriots, 14 at ReadAnyBook. Clines' Ex-Heroes series is fantastic.

Ex-Patriots : A Novel. Book in the Ex-Heroes Series). The second novel in Peter Clines' bestselling Ex series. George, Cerberus, Zzzap, and Stealth gathered Los Angeles's survivors behind the walls of their fortress, the Mount.

The second novel in Peter Clines' bestselling Ex series.It's been two years since the plague of ex-humans decimated mankind. Two years since the superheroes St. George, Cerberus, Zzzap, and Stealth gathered Los Angeles’s survivors behind the walls of their fortress, the Mount.  Since then, the heroes have been fighting to give the Mount’s citizens hope, and something like a real life. But now supplies are growing scarce, the zombies are pressing in . . . and the heroes are wondering how much longer they can hold out.   Then hope arrives in the form of a surviving US Army battalion--and not just any battalion. The men and women of the Army's Project Krypton survived the outbreak because they are super-soldiers, created before mankind's fall to be better, stronger, faster than normal humans--and their secure base in Arizona beckons as a much needed refuge for the beleaguered heroes and their charges.  But a dark secret lies at the heart of Project Krypton, and those behind it wield an awesome and terrifying power. 


Flamekiller
When it comes to writing fiction, Peter Clines is an abstract artist. A brand new author who dares to defy the conventional in order to find his own unique style of writing. His debut Ex-Heroes was anything but ordinary, it combined the traditional zombie splatter-fest with superhero fiction, it was the kind of story you'd expect to come from a graphic novel. No, it technically wasn't original, but Clines was the first I've seen to truly do the concept justice, and now he's back with a sequel, Ex-Patriots. Despite some missteps, fans of Ex-Heroes should be satisfied.

With communication established with a U.S. Army, it would seem it's time for the superheroes to hang up their coats and let them take over as the guardians of Los Angeles's survivors, yet appearances can be deceiving. The creation of super-soldiers is merely the beginning, what's really going on at Project Krypton? Can the United States Army be trusted? And are they the real enemy?

A personal criticism I had for Ex-Heroes was its run-of-the-mill storyline. It found its own identity towards the latter half, but for the most part Ex-Heroes was a very strong character driven story instead of a plot-driven one. Ex-Patriots on the other hand doesn't suffer from a typical zombie apocalypse plot that you've probably already seen a million times already. The story this time is definitely strong enough to stand on its own without the added awesome factor of superheroes fighting zombies. That being said, there's a bizarre story-arc that's completely dropped without giving any further exposition or closure. The book's synopsis describes the inhabitants of the Mount growing irrationally dissatisfied with living under the heroes' leadership. There are a mere two scenes that correlate with this plot-thread, then it's unceremoniously dropped, making the whole thing amount to nothing. Why this was on the book's synopsis, let alone in the book is beyond me.

An opportunity that I felt Clines didn't quite nail in the last book was showing the decline of moral codes in the individual heroes. It's a characteristic from the zombie genre that would have had an interesting effect on superheroes. It would have tied the two genres ever closer and given the title Ex-Heroes a deeper meaning. In Ex-Patriots, Clines instead uses the U.S. Army to demonstrate a collapse in proper ethics. Despite several satirical diatribes made about the cliché nature of the plot, it does eventually divert its course in an interesting new direction that I doubt anyone will see coming.

The key aspects which made Ex-Heroes so incredible was its insane premise and its believably flawed characters. Each individual superhero was so well characterized that it easily saved the book from an average storyline. Ex-Patriots seems to be the opposite from its predecessor, forgoing the incredibly strong characterization for a better plot. It's an interesting gamble that I don't think was for the better. Each of the heroes was previously characterized in a very peculiar fashion, through personal flashback "THEN" chapters from the viewpoint of their first-person perspectives. It was a unique method of storytelling that worked beautifully. It really fleshed out each of the superheroes' personas, origins, and experiences as crime fighters. By the end, each hero was well characterized and really melded together as a team. The format returns for Ex-Patriots but it isn't as well utilized this time. The various super-soldiers and military personal in which the flashbacks elaborate upon simply aren't very interesting. St. George and the other heroes stole the show in the last book, these other characters simply pale in comparison. Their personalities range from bratty, rude, to insufferably annoying; a certain flashback probably broke a record for the most dropped F-Bombs and use of vulgar insults at female promiscuity.

The problem with the flashbacks focusing on the military personal is that the original superheroes feel less developed than in the first book. They each feel like caricatures for superhero archetypes rather than the flawed human beings which Clines did an excellent job illustrating. This doesn't mean they're any less interesting, I still tipped my hat at St. George's honor, held my sides laughing at Zzzap's pop-culture references, and marveled at Stealth's cunning superhuman sense of analysis. Danielle a.k.a Cerberus was the only character to undergo any development or retain her original flawed nature. Clines also needs to seriously reconsider how he implements minor characters into his narrative. Offering nothing more than an anonymous group of names isn't giving the reader characterization or any reason to be concerned for their safety. I couldn't even tell that the character Billy was a woman at first.

A few new hero characters are introduced, though one of them works better than the others. The first is The Driver; a wily kid from the disbanded Seventeens simply looking to do some good with his powers. He's a welcome addition, though his introduction is a very obvious set up for a deus ex machina. The second new addition is Captain Freedom, whose characterization is absolutely all over the place and frankly isn't very interesting. One moment he's a no-holds brawler who punches first and asks questions later, then he's an honorable pacifist who only uses force when necessary. Like the rest of the super-soldiers he's very generic and pales in comparison to the other superheroes. I can see him becoming more interesting in the third novel if the ending is any indication, but for the majority of the book I didn't care much for him.

My critiques may give off the impression that I dislike this book but that simply isn't the case, this is a book that absolutely needs to be read. Like Ex-Heroes, there simply isn't anything quite like it. I'll say it again, Peter Clines is an artist who defies nearly all contemporary guidelines in order to find his own unique style. We need to reward daring people like this who are passionate about following their own direction, even if it may or may not catch on. He didn't dumb-down his vision for a wider audience, he stuck to his guns and has earned my respect for it.

Oh lest we forget Peter Clines's delightfully dark sense of humor. He's created a very interesting balancing act between illustrating an entertaining story with large stakes, while at the same time not taking itself completely seriously, even going as far as to parody its own ludicrous premise. The infamous "dead celebrity" running gag from Ex-Heroes returns, along with cynical jabs at overused cliches, and several pop-culture references. A particular Transformers joke had me cracking up with laughter. It lightens the mood considerably from what would otherwise have been a very downtrodden and morose atmosphere. It's the sign of an author who truly has fun as a writer.

Ex-Patriots isn't quite as good as Ex-Heroes, but it's still a one of kind experience that can't be found anywhere else. The flashbacks weren't as compelling this time due to their focus on less interesting characters, I would have preferred more attention being paid to the original characters while seamlessly implementing the new ones. But this misstep doesn't stop Ex-Patriots from being something truly special. It's a uniquely realized homage to zombies, superheroes, mad science, and pop-culture all wrapped up with a deviously twisted sense of humor. How could you go wrong with that?
Blueshaper
I have to admit I gave the first book 4 stars- it was good, well written (and to the nitpickers, its fiction. okay?) and the pop culture references were a lot of fun. Never been a huge zombie fan, but Clines mythology is fascating (esp the 'how they came to be' explanation is startling).

Now to 'ex-patriots' .... the plotting was good/interesting/basic...until HOLY SMOKE! Did Clines just do what I THINK he did? DANG. Talk about a writer who can pull it together. I was torn between dragging out reading this book to make it last or sitting down and chewing threw in one big GULP. Really nice work on existing characters- I really like how he is....humanizing Stealth- more than what you think there, showing a wacky human-er side to Zzzap (love the pop culture references (to someone who watches movies all day (Zzzap, not me)...and some of the newer characters. The alternating then/now takes takes some getting used to, but Clines does a nice job of feeding us bits and character pieces that really enhance our knowledge fascinatingly. Captain Freedom being a nice example- instead of a stock character we get some really interesting shading on this 'hero'. Ditto Dr Sorensen, we are never quite sure if he is 'mad/angry', 'mad/looney' or 'mad/scary' or just flat out nuts...or is he?

If you remotely liked the first book, this is a MUST read. Please read in order. The plot twist is a true hum-dinger, one of those 'glad I wasn't in a diner so no one could hear me exclaim "Damnnnnnnn, didn't see that one coming" (for the record I am writing this review having read 89% of the book).
Whitegrove
I absolutely loved Ex-Heroes, the genre-blending book by Peter Clines. Here, the pace noticeably picks up with Ex-Patriots. To sum up the story from the first book, superheroes made a too-brief appearance in the world before it was decimated by a virus that turned humans into the walking dead. It's been almost two years since the outbreak, and the few superheroes left have established a safe zone in Los Angeles where they managed to get together a little over 20,000 survivors. While constantly fighting off the hordes of "ex-humans", they lead scavenging runs to try to find more supplies and, hopefully, survivors.

This story picks up when an army drone finds St. George (the superstrong hero with an unerring moral compass) and the scavangers, during one of their runs. One of the Army bases has survived, it holds a troop of enhanced soldiers, and the survivors try to decide if they can trust a heavily-armed troop that wishes to place them under martial law. After all, they've survived all this time and there doesn't seem to be a government left where martial law could be put into effect. Soon enough though, we discover that all is not as it seems with these soldiers.

The characters are flawless. They come to life and feel three-dimensional and real. The plot races along. The writing style engages your senses, and everything is well thought out and executed. It's a wonderful blend of zombies and supermen, while never feeling like an exploitation of either genre. Being the second book in the series, the first one, Ex-Heroes, should really be read first. While this is a stand-alone story, it's enriched by the backstory that's established in the first book.

I have to say that this has become one of my favorite series to date.

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