ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » So Say We All: An Unauthorized Collection of Thoughts and Opinions on Battlestar Galactica (Smart Pop series)
So Say We All: An Unauthorized Collection of Thoughts and Opinions on Battlestar Galactica (Smart Pop series) e-book

Author:

Richard Hatch

Language:

English

Category:

Fantasy

Subcategory:

Science Fiction

ePub size:

1976 kb

Other formats:

mbr lit rtf mobi

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Smart Pop (September 10, 2006)

Pages:

264

ISBN:

1932100946

So Say We All: An Unauthorized Collection of Thoughts and Opinions on Battlestar Galactica (Smart Pop series) e-book

by Richard Hatch


Great book and a must for all Battlestar Galactica fans! RIP Richard! . I'm a regular watcher of Battlestar and thought these essays added something to the shows as I watched! I did get a little tired of reading all th. .

So Say We All" even pushes the buttons of its own audience by including an essay entitled "GINO" or "Galactica in Name Only. I have to respect a book more when it's willing to include material that bashes the very show it's trying to praise. I'm a regular watcher of Battlestar and thought these essays added something to the shows as I watched! I did get a little tired of reading all the "religion" essays (monotheism, polytheism of Colonials, et.

She's giving the whole BattleStar Gallactica series and the book, So Say We All, by Richard Hatch, four paws up and one lick of the tongue.

This is, generally, a thought-provoking collection of essays about Battlestar Galactica, and I enjoyed it immensely. There is one article that is condescending and insulting, entitled "GINO," which reads like the fevered diatribe from a fan of the campy 1978 version that never quite reached maturity. She's giving the whole BattleStar Gallactica series and the book, So Say We All, by Richard Hatch, four paws up and one lick of the tongue. Have you been following Battlestar Gallactica??

The science-fiction television series Battlestar Galactica is known for raising thought-provoking questions concerning martial law, artificial intelligence, power and corruption, and ultimately what it means to be human

The science-fiction television series Battlestar Galactica is known for raising thought-provoking questions concerning martial law, artificial intelligence, power and corruption, and ultimately what it means to be human.

So Say We All: Collected Thoughts and Opinions on "Battlestar Galactica" (Smart Pop). Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

So Say We All. (2006) An Unauthorized Collection of Thoughts and Opinions on Battlestar Galactica A non fiction book by Richard Hatch. The science-fiction television series Battlestar Galactica is known for raising thought-provoking questions concerning martial law, artificial intelligence, power and corruption, and ultimately what it means to be human

In So Say We All, Gross and Altman don’t dwell on these coincidences, but instead let the reader discover for .

In So Say We All, Gross and Altman don’t dwell on these coincidences, but instead let the reader discover for themselves. Like any good oral history, you can jump around in the volume and not get too disoriented. Ryan Britt is a longtime contributor to To. om.

Richard Hatch, best known for his roles as Captain Apollo on the original Battlestar Galactica series and Tom Zarek in the 2004 BSG reboot, has died. Hatch passed away on Tuesday after an extended fight with pancreatic cancer. A fixture at conventions for decades, Hatch has a devoted fan following who, no doubt, join his family and friends in mourning his loss. In recent years, Hatch had labored over his passion project, a transmedia sci-fi epic called The Great War of Magellan. He was also involved in the controversial Star Trek fan film, Prelude to Axanar.

The science-fiction television series Battlestar Galactica is known for raising thought-provoking questions concerning martial . Being a huge fan of the 78 series, I was interested in the "remake" of Battlestar. Needless to say, I am completly hooked.

The science-fiction television series Battlestar Galactica is known for raising thought-provoking questions concerning martial law, artificial intelligence, power. I recieved this book for Christmas, as sort of a joke from my family.

The science fiction television series Battlestar Galactica is known for raising thought-provoking questions concerning martial law, artificial intelligence, power and . These questions and more are explored in So Say We All.

The science fiction television series Battlestar Galactica is known for raising thought-provoking questions concerning martial law, artificial intelligence, power and corruption, and ultimately what it means to be human. What ethical complexities come into play when one mistake could mean the annihilation of the human race? How do you maintain faith in the Gods when you’re involved in an Armageddon of your own creation? What is the distinction between a terrorist and a freedom fighter? These questions and more are explored in So Say We All.

Four decades after its groundbreaking debut, Battlestar Galactica-both the 1978 original and its 2004 reimagining have captured the hearts of two generations of fans. So Say We All! Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Guide to the 100 Best Books of the Year. Connect with the author. What emerges is an intriguing look inside the sausage-making process that is television and film production.

The science-fiction television series Battlestar Galactica is known for raising thought-provoking questions concerning martial law, artificial intelligence, power and corruption, and ultimately what it means to be human. What ethical complexities come into play when one mistake could mean the anihilation of the human race? How do you maintain faith in the Gods when you're involved in an Armageddon of your own creation? What is the distinction between a terrorist and a freedom fighter? These questions are given an intelligent and insightful examination in this engaging collection of essays.
Kuve
There are some interesting essay in the this book (e.g., "The Mirror Frakked") and some lesser ones that aren't that great, but the real problem with this book is that all the essays were written before Season 3! The essays cover only the mini-series, Season 1, and Season 2. In some ways it's interesting, because you can see whether the authors' conclusions bear out through the remainder of the series, but mostly it's frustrating that the analysis stops. Therefore, the book seems only half-finished.

An admirable effort, but the essays were written three years too soon.
Vareyma
I liked the different perspectives from each author. It made me think a bit differently that I had before. I would recommend this to a die hard Battlestar fan.
Nicanagy
Great book and a must for all Battlestar Galactica fans! RIP Richard!
Fonceiah
I recently purchased both season 1 and season 2 "official guides" and was immediately disappointed by the lack of intelligent content. There were a few tidbits of information about the producers' perception and experiences in creating specific episodes, but I was so disappointed by a lack of meaty material and the excessive number of PR photos which showed us nothing new about the show, the actors or the creative process.

Battlestar Galactica reminds me a little bit of how The Simpsons is always saying more than you think. You watch and you know there's something metaphorical going on, but not sure what it is at all times. That's why the official Simpsons guides are so great - the point out the references and allusions you might have missed.

This supposed "unauthorized" collection of thoughts and opinions has the content I was looking for. Right out of the gate the first writer, Eric Greene, talks about terrorism, 9-11, human rights and a myriad of current events and how they're dealt with in the show. It challenges you. For example, as admirable as President Roslin is, she clearly violates her stated beliefs of supporting democracy. Just like the show, the author doesn't let you off the hook. It demands that you look at the situation in its entirety and admit that maybe what you emotionally want isn't exactly what you say you believe.

This first essay even offers a few examples of metaphor that I know I missed entirely. The assassination of Boomer on Galactica? Think 1963 in a parking garage when a man named Jack Ruby decides to take matters into his own hands.

"So Say We All" even pushes the buttons of its own audience by including an essay entitled "GINO" or "Galactica in Name Only." It's an in your face negative review of the modern BSG and praise of the original (which I personally find to be campy nonsense). I have to respect a book more when it's willing to include material that bashes the very show it's trying to praise.

That's the kind of content I wanted from the "official guides." BSG is a political show for our times. At times it's liberal, at times it's conservative, at times it's in the middle. Part of that process is not taking the easy route. It means challenging its audience to think and examine their own beliefs. And that's exactly what "So Say We All" does as a book. I highly recommend it.
Weetont
Excellent product and excellent seller, a real asset for Amazon
Majin
Overall well-written, thoughtful essays, on a variety of aspects of the show - religion, gender roles, the media, politics, psychology.

A few too many of them focused on the show's relevance to current politics, which, please, I am SO tired of people on both sides of the Iraq War fussing at how some movie or TV show is so "liberal" or so "conservative," didn't anyone ever hear about classical themes?

I would have liked more humor, even given the general darkness of the show. The only "funny" essay was the one that placed characters into different jobs, which I thought was thoroughly un-funny, and the weakest essay of the book. I liked the inclusion of a negative essay, a bold move but one that made me appreciate the updated show more.
Aradwyn
I really enjoyed reading the essays in this book. I'm a regular watcher of Battlestar and thought these essays added something to the shows as I watched! I did get a little tired of reading all the "religion" essays (monotheism, polytheism of Colonials, etc.). I ended up skipping one or two of those. There were a couple of creative and fictional essays as well. I recommend this for true Battlestar fans.
For a book of essays this was pretty good with the usual mix of very interesting, thoughtful, well written, and entertaining articles with some that simply filled up 20 pages by re-telling me things I already knew about the show before finally making their point or prattling on about subjects I'm not interested in.

The first half of the book is very religion heavy and as someone who does not like that aspect of the show so much I found these essays really boring and skipped most of them. Some essays attempt to be humorous and are pretend addresses to congress or Cylon meeting minutes, and yet others get far too intellectual for my liking with their theorems and axioms.

The more enjoyable essays look at the moral ambiguity and things that go in to the show to make us think about the goings on in the world today.

Another couple look at the differences between the original series and the new one including what things were kept and re-imaged or taken as inspiration for events in the new series.

One details an author's hatred of the Miniseries and then his surprise liking of the new show once the seasons started.

There are also some articles where female authors finger themselves off over the wonderfully strong, intelligent, attractive, skilful and complex female characters in the new series, which of course is so true.

Yet more look at fascism and the role of the media in space, and to top it all off the book has an interesting and well written introduction and ending by Richard Hatch.

All in all a good read and I enjoyed at least half of the essays in this book. A must for all serious Battlestar Galactica fans.

e-Books related to So Say We All: An Unauthorized Collection of Thoughts and Opinions on Battlestar Galactica (Smart Pop series)