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» » Scarlet Traces: The Great Game
Scarlet Traces: The Great Game e-book

Author:

Ian Edginton,D'Israeli

Language:

English

Category:

Comics

Subcategory:

Graphic Novels

ePub size:

1557 kb

Other formats:

mbr rtf txt mobi

Rating:

4.3

Publisher:

Dark Horse; First Edition edition (June 26, 2007)

Pages:

104

ISBN:

1593077173

Scarlet Traces: The Great Game e-book

by Ian Edginton,D'Israeli


The Complete Scarlet Traces Vol. 1. Ian Edginton. While the first volume is a guided tour of this alternate Britain, the Great Game picks up years later and follows photojournalist Charlotte Hemmings as she journeys to the Martian front, where English soldiers are the invaders.

The Complete Scarlet Traces Vol. Scarlet Traces: Empire of Blood. Again, as in the first book, not all is as it seems, and the march of progress steps to the cadence of conspiracy and deceit.

I also thought the artwork was excellent, lovely clear lines and a great selection of imagined machinery, though I'm not sure how much of an advance legged black cabs would be. Good book, though in my view not quite up to the standards of Alan Moore and the amazing League of Extraordinary Gentlemen series.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Scarlet Traces: The Great Game as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The ground-breaking series from Ian Edginton and D'Israeli is collected in this the first of two volumes.

This book can be found in: Graphic Novels & Manga Graphic novels Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Science fiction Graphic Novels & Manga Literary & memoirs. The ground-breaking series from Ian Edginton and D'Israeli is collected in this the first of two volumes. Starting with their visionary adaptation of the original novel, the collection also includes the first of three sequel stories set a decade after the Martian invasion. Great Britain has cannibalised Martian technology and now Hansom cabs scuttle along on multi-limbed crab legs, and the Martian heat-ray has become the weapon with which the British Empire dominates the world.

Scarlet Traces is a Steampunk comic series written by Ian Edginton and illustrated by D'Israeli. It was originally published online before being serialised in 2002, in the British anthology Judge Dredd Megazine. A sequel, Scarlet Traces: The Great Game, followed in 2006. Edginton and D'Israeli's 2006 adaptation of .

Writer: Ian Edginton. and an even greater revelation that could spell the extinction of all human life on Earth. Publication date: July 2006 - October 2006.

Scarlet Traces is a comic story of the Steampunk genre, written by Ian Edginton and . D'Israeli reworked Scarlet Traces as a traditional comic book story. Best Writer, Ian Edginton, for his work on The Great Game.

Scarlet Traces is a comic story of the Steampunk genre, written by Ian Edginton and illustrated by D'Israeli. It was originally published online before being serialised in 2002. This version was serialised in 2002 in the British anthology Judge Dredd Megazine (vol 4) issues 16 to 18. In 2003 it was collected in its own 4-issue limited series (with minor revisions) by Dark Horse Comics, and subsequently collected into one hardcover volume by Dark Horse Comics in August 2003 (ISBN 1-56971-940-3).

IAN EDGINTON (W) and D'ISRAELI (A) FC, 32pg

IAN EDGINTON (W) and D'ISRAELI (A) FC, 32pg. It is five decades after the Martians' failed attempt to invade Earth. The aged gentleman adventurer?and hero of the previous graphic novel, Scarlet Traces?reveals that dastardly deeds are being done on Mars! Someone must go there and bring back the proof they need, and Hemming is the prime candidate.

Hardback Books Ian Fleming for Children. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication. Hardback Books Trace Moroney for Children in English. Hardback Books Trace Moroney for Children. Trace Moroney Hardback Non-Fiction Books.

The front line of the War of the Worlds has been taken to the red planet itself! After almost four decades of conflict, the British invasion of Mars has ground into a bloody stalemate. The nation is cracking at the seams, and liberties are being revoked as Prime Minister Spry struggles to maintain order at home while waging war another world away. What does Spry have up his nasty little sleeve? Robert Autumn, aged gentleman adventurer and hero of Scarlet Traces, is determined to find out!
Jothris
As noted by the other reviewer(s), this graphic novel should appeal to all fans of `retro' SF and steampunk, such as devotees of the `Extraordinary Gentlemen' series of comics. And if you're not a steampunk fan but can appreciate good storytelling and handsome artwork, well, then you too should pick up a copy (along with `Scarlet Traces', if you haven't done so already).

[However, in a post-literate, XBox- and Playstation- dominated landscape, I suspect that some of the little nudges and sly pop culture references that appear in `Game' may draw blank looks from readers under 40.]

As a sequel to `Scarlet Traces', `Game' deals with the British-led war against the Martians on the latter's home turf. After ace news reporter Charlotte Hemmings (who seems to be based on the pioneering reporter Marguerite Higgins) looks a bit too closely at the political machinations behind the conduct of the war, she finds her life in danger. Aged adventurer Robert Autumn, from `Scarlet Traces', intervenes to save her, and arranges for Charlotte to journey to the battlefield. Once on Mars she discovers that there are bigger stories at play than just the combat with the Martians.

The Victorian-meets-alien aesthetic that defined the artwork of `Scarlet Traces' is thoroughly updated in `Game', which isn't shy about paying homage to the great `Dan Dare' British SF comics of the 50s and 60s.

Anyone who prefers their rocket ships to be needle-nosed, with great sweeping fins and colorful livery, will find satisfaction in `Game'. Both land and space battles are rendered with verve and color by D'Israeli, whose style calls to mind the cleanly delineated draftsmanship of European artists (such as Herge') of the mid-20th century. This may be a reflection of the book's initial incarnation as a web comic; however, it's gratifying to see yet another SF title that doesn't rely on the figurative art style so in vogue in so many horror or fantasy titles on the shelves.
Cordalas
The most charming element of the Great Game, and its predecessor Scarlet Traces is the notion that following the H.G. Wells epic War of the Worlds, the British Empire reverse engineers captured Martian technology and become THE world power. Edginton does a wonderful job of believably inserting advanced alien technology into British culture and society, and the artwork of D'Isreal on both volumes is nothing short of stunning.

While the first volume is a guided tour of this alternate Britain, the Great Game picks up years later and follows photojournalist Charlotte Hemmings as she journeys to the Martian front, where English soldiers are the invaders. Again, as in the first book, not all is as it seems, and the march of progress steps to the cadence of conspiracy and deceit.

Despite the return of aged adventurer Robert Autumn from the first volume, this book doesn't have the same appeal. The story moves a bit too fast to maintain any real suspense, which drains the life out of the big reveal at the end of the book. A number of story elements have also recently appeared in other contemporary graphic novels; this book could just as easily have been a sequel to Alan Moore's League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Volume Two, or Ministry of Space, by Warren Ellis.

It is still leaps and bounds ahead of most graphic novels on the shelf, and gets four stars. The art is beautiful and will appeal to Dan Dare fans. Though the pacing is rushed, the Great Game is fun science fiction and worth reading (at least once), Also, the thin hardback binding is alluring, and fits wonderfully next to Scarlet Traces and the War of the Worlds graphic novel adaptation by the same team.
Zeueli
I thoroughly enjoyed Scarlet Traces but found this sequel to be half-hearted. The cover of the blue edition states: "The War of the Worlds battlefront moves to Mars...." Well, okay, after half the book is spent setting up a reason for someone to go to Mars and retelling Scarlet Traces, the main character indeed does goes to Mars. There's some generic fighting with familiar aliens and a hint of astounding mysteries and secrets that are only ever explained in a rudimentary fashion. The characters are no more than stock charactitures, the action occurs mostly as a backdrop to talking. I give it two stars for some pretty good artwork. Perhaps my expectations were just too high after Scarlet Traces.
Bluecliff
A very good follow up to the first, and leaving interesting directions for the next.

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