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» » Batman R.I.P
Batman R.I.P e-book

Author:

Grant Morrison

Language:

Spanish

Category:

Comics

Subcategory:

Graphic Novels

ePub size:

1127 kb

Other formats:

doc mobi lit docx

Rating:

4.1

Publisher:

Planeta de agostini (2009)

ISBN:

8467477067

Batman R.I.P e-book

by Grant Morrison


With Morrison, it is his style that tends to pull focus for the reader. To begin, the writing is pretty much what I expected from Morrison. It is dense, complex, confusing, entertaining, and appropriately Batman.

is an American comic book story arc published in Batman by DC Comics. Written by Grant Morrison, penciled by Tony Daniel, and with covers by Alex Ross, the story pits the superhero Batman against the Black Glove organization as they attempt to destroy everything for which he stands. It has a number of tie-ins in other DC Comics titles describing events not told in the main story

Grant Morrison (born 31 January 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer, playwright and occultist. Batman Unwrapped: R. I. P. Prepare for the unthinkable: the death of the Dark Knight.

Grant Morrison (born 31 January 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer, playwright and occultist. He is known for his nonlinear narratives and counter-cultural leanings, as well as his successful runs on titles like Animal Man, Doom Patrol, JLA, The Invisibles, New X-Men, Fantastic Four, All-Star Superman, and Batman. Bruce Wayne's troubled life spins out of control when his relationship with the mysterious Jezebel Jet deepens.

This page is part of an experimental template construction for a new type of page, using the currently non-existent Run Template. Don't touch it while it's under construction. Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth. Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight #9.

Pre-Reading – The Black Casebook. P and this is where it gets tricky and confusing and we wouldn’t really recommend any reader to jump right into here without reading some of Morrison’s previous work and perhaps The Black Casebook.

Grant Morrison’s Batman . To that point there is no doubt. Batman RIP may be the greatest Batman book ever. The Dark Knight goes up against the Black Glove in a tense final confrontation with their leader Dr Hurt. is a challenging read. One of the reasons it’s such a great Batman book is because it has so many layers and interpretations, not to mention ingenious storytelling methods and an enormous amount of imaginative scenes and It struck me today that Grant Morrison must love opera. You can read my article on the 9 Reasons Why Batman RIP is a Masterpiece here!

Batman RIP: WTH? Morrison's capable of doing incredible things (Doom Patrol, Invisibles), but his Batman work is a bit off the .

Batman RIP: WTH? Morrison's capable of doing incredible things (Doom Patrol, Invisibles), but his Batman work is a bit off the rails from the get-go. Grant Morrison has been working with DC Comics for more than twenty years, beginning with his legendary runs on the revolutionary titles ANIMAL MAN and DOOM PATROL. Since then he has written numerous best-sellers „ including JLA, BATMAN and New X-Men „ as well as the critically acclaimed creator-owned series THE INVISIBLES, SEAGUY, THE FILTH, WE3 and JOE THE BARBARIAN.

Batman: RIP is a graphic novel by Grant Morrison and is part of his Batman run. Batman is trying to stop the Black . The illustrations for Batman: RIP are okay-Tony Daniel did a good job, but nothing about this book is particularly memorable

Batman: RIP is a graphic novel by Grant Morrison and is part of his Batman run. Batman is trying to stop the Black Glove, but they have plans for Batman and launch an attack that will cripple him psychologically. Will they destroy him or will he defeat them? Is this the end of Batman? This Story Is Weird. The illustrations for Batman: RIP are okay-Tony Daniel did a good job, but nothing about this book is particularly memorable. The fight scenes are good and some of the imagery is interesting but nothing else about this book really stands out to me. It tries to be something grand but it just turns out to be a disappointing graphic novel that tries to be more than it actually is.


Westened
Right off the bat (no pun intended), buyer beware that if you haven't read Morrison's Batman and Son, you'll have no idea what's going on in this trade. If you have read that collection, this book is a no-brainer. Batman and Son comes across as a somewhat scattershot book, jumping from one storyline to the next without any real feeling of connection between the plots outside of the occasional mention of the "Black Glove." This is the book that brings all of those stories together and gives them a satisfying conclusion...if you don't want to read any further.

What do I mean by that? There are two different groups who may benefit from buying this book. The first is those who just want to see the Black Glove storyline introduced in Batman and Son played out to its conclusion. This book definitely gives you "an" ending to that story. The second is those who want to experience the full story that began in Batman and Son. For those people, they'll need to read this followed by: Final Crisis, Batman: Time and the Batman, Morrison's Batman and Robin Vol 1-3, The Return of Bruce Wayne, Morrison's Batman Incorporated, and the New 52 volumes of Batman Incorporated.

One quick note for those who wish to follow the whole storyline: when reading this book, stop at the point where the Black Glove storyline seemingly ends and the book jumps into what seems like a completely different plot (to minimize spoilers, said climax involves an aerial vehicle crashing). The issues after that moment are included in Final Crisis, and they make a lot more sense when read in that context as opposed to how they are presented in this book.
jorik
NB: there are a couple of spoilers, but this story is almost 7 years old, so don't be too surprised. Also, as the author is Grant Morrison, this book necessitates a longer review to be fair.

The main commonality amongst all the reviews here seem to be Grant Morrison's writing in RIP. This is sensible, as it is the writing, not the art, that is the most defining feature of this book. With Morrison, it is his style that tends to pull focus for the reader.

To begin, the writing is pretty much what I expected from Morrison. It is dense, complex, confusing, entertaining, and appropriately Batman. Morrison is not my favorite writer, and I struggle with reading pretty much any of his collections in one sitting. Before judging, it is not because I am not smart enough to comprehend a deeper meaning he hides, or too distracted for works without payoffs every page. No, I struggle because his work gives me a lot to think about and process what I just read. Though the reader gets this complete story collection in one book, it was not meant to be read this way. The story feels like it was meant to have the reader wait months for the whole picture. As a result, reading two or three chapters at once may reduce the drama, or overload the reader without be given the chance to digest the chapter.

The story itself is somewhat disjointed and fragmented, but that's exactly what was expected. I would say there were maybe five or six times I checked to see if two pages were stuck together, because the story shifted gears so suddenly and inorganically. Morrison was probably going for this angle, but just because this was his intent doesn't mean it is all excusable. I can appreciate waiting a long time to see answers finally revealed in a story, even in vague, uncertain terms, but I also value some degree of clarity and linear ideas. I confess, I had to head over to Wikipedia to make sure I got everything after I had read this book a couple of times, just to make sure I got everything. I am not a comics snob, but I dislike having to go to Wikipedia for summaries. So, I felt a little dumb having to read a summary of a COMIC book that I read twice. I'm not a Mensa member, but I don't feel that I am unintelligent. I am all in favor of a thought-provoking comic book, and this certainly is one. I only feel that at times it is more of a head-scratcher out of confusion, instead of big ideas.

The final not on the writing is that, as I'm sure others have mentioned, is that the actual moment when Bruce Wayne 'dies', is not included in a collection called Batman RIP. Some might say that having that moment when Darkseid blasts Batman with his Omega beams would feel really out of place in this book. They are right, sort of. The issues where Bruce is suddenly being experimented on by Darkseid's scientists are included, with zero explanation of how this whole situation came to be. I mean nothing. Not even a *see Final Crisis for the context of this bizarre scene* note. The moment of Batman's 'death' probably could have been included, with panels worked in with at least a mild sense of context. However, knowing Morrison, this idea was probably tested, and the final panel would just not have worked as well.

The art is passable. It's certainly not Daniels' best work, but he is one of those artists who have been improving over time, so I don't believe he was not trying here. Daniels has proven himself a most talented artist on the Justice League and Batman & Robin Eternal series. The only reason I mention this is that when I saw his name on the cover, I was expecting the quality of work he shows on more recent titles. His work here is not as dynamic as that of Hush, or as clean as that in Year One, but it gets the job done without ever crossing into mediocre territory. His Joker is creepy, almost to the point of being grotesque, but undeniably the Clown Prince of Crime. The covers by Alex Ross are all welcome and fantastic. I would not have wanted his particular style to tell this story, but his art was great to see and actually helped my overall view of this collection. To be fair to Daniels, having his work offset by one of my favorite artists may have accentuated the differences in artistic skill.

Thanks if you've stuck with me this far. To conclude, I like this story, but it may not be for everyone. It feels like Batman, without a doubt, but there is an alien element, something different that is immediately noticeable. While relatively inexpensive, this story almost certainly requires the reader to invest in more than one collection to gain full appreciation for Morrison's Batman.
Samulkis
Grant Morrison has always been a "concept over everything else" when it comes to his comics. Some people like it, some don't. "What if Batman had a son he didn't know about with Thalia?" "Maybe Batman is just as crazy as the inmates in Arkham?" He's a stoner's Batman fan. He asks these ridiculous questions and sees them through, and sometimes that pays off well, like in Arkham Asylum, and sometimes you get Batman RIP.

If you're a fan of Batman because you love film noir, you love detective stories, you love deep philosophical and ethical questions, if you love Shakespearean tragedy - in effect, if you love what made Batman popular in the first place (see the 1940's prints, the 1970's start to get dark and personal with "Strange Apparitions"), then this book isn't for you. It has all of those pieces but it doesn't seem to really like the character of Batman. The villains are forgettable. The Romantic obvious without being enjoyable. The plot convoluted. And above all, it's the one thing that's unenjoyable about Batman - *It's over the top*. It is both dark and campy, which is like mixing cheap scotch with orange soda.

Grant buried Batman so far into the ground that DC had to have Snyder take over their biggest superhero (See the Owl's story line, and Death of the Family for something that at least likes and understands Batman as he should be). It should give you an idea of just how bad this book can get.
Ndlaitha
Grant Morrison's Batman arcs all come to a brilliant, intense finale in the Batman R.I.P. comic book! The violence, insanity, and preparation of Batman and Son, The Black Glove, & Batman: The Resurrection of Ra's Al Ghul all come together in Batman's most harrowing tale to conquer his fears and mind and take out The Black Glove. It's all so well written and drawn, it's mind blowing. The number of puzzles, clues, twists, and turns this book gives you is immense. The mystery and action combine with dream sequences, fights, and personal revelations for each character. If you've read Morrison's other Batman works to prepare for this one, you must read this phenomenal book. Enjoy the wild ride!

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