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» » Dead of Night: Devil-Slayer
Dead of Night: Devil-Slayer e-book

Author:

Chris Samnee,Brian Keene

Language:

English

Category:

Comics

Subcategory:

Graphic Novels

ePub size:

1613 kb

Other formats:

azw lit lrf txt

Rating:

4.1

Publisher:

Marvel (June 10, 2009)

Pages:

96

ISBN:

0785132813

Dead of Night: Devil-Slayer e-book

by Chris Samnee,Brian Keene


Written by horror author Brian Keene with art by Chris Samnee, DEAD OF NIGHT: Devil-Slayer is meh at best. Devil-Slayer, at least a different version of him, Dan Sylva’s uncle Eric, has been around since 1977

Written by horror author Brian Keene with art by Chris Samnee, DEAD OF NIGHT: Devil-Slayer is meh at best. The story isn’t that intriguing and once we get to the point of it all- They use ritual sacrifice to gather energy from human soul. ith enough energy, they’ll unleash the forces of Hell. Devil-Slayer, at least a different version of him, Dan Sylva’s uncle Eric, has been around since 1977. For this version, however, Keene has created his own take on the character. Dan Sylva knows only that his uncle suffered from PTSD after Vietnam, but nothing about his stint as the Defender known as Devil-Slayer.

Brian Keene delivered as always, and so did a younger Chris Samnee. Oct 27, 2012 Wesley rated it liked it.

The reinvented Devil-Slayer takes Marvel's Dead of Night to terrifying new heights, from award-winning horror novelist Brian Keene (The Rising, Dark Hollow) and artist Chris Samnee (Daredevil: Blood of the Tarantula)! Collects Dead of Night Featuring Devil-Slayer Brian Keene delivered as always, and so did a younger Chris Samnee.

Like other Arab revolutions in 2011, it is said that Yemen's rebellion was modeled on street protests in Tunis and Cairo. As this erudite new study explains, however, what happened in Yemen is far from being a mere echo of events elsewhere.

Artist: Chris Samnee. Publication date: November 2008 - February 2009. Abandoned by his family and his government, Sgt. Dan Sylva returns to Iraq for a third tour of duty and a descent into Hell itself.

Featured Characters: Sergeant Danny Sylva (First appearance). Supporting Characters: . Army (First appearance). Quick Reaction Force (. PVC Miles Ochse (Only appearance; dies) (Joins team). Demarkus (Only appearance; dies). Zims (Only appearance; dies). Kellerman (Only appearance; dies). Lopez (Only appearance; dies). Kennison (Only appearance; dies). Hasseron (Only appearance; dies). Januson (Only appearance; dies). Jones (Only appearance; dies).

And while Ennis and Chaykin embraced the disillusionment and the randomness of their time, writer Brian Keene and artist Chris Samnee embrace the chaos and the corporate influence of our time. Dead of Night Featuring Devil-Slayer" (hereafter called just "Devil-Slayer") isn't an allegory about our current military escapades. It's distinctly about what's going on in Iraq right now, but with a supernatural twist at the end. This isn't called "Devil-Slayer" because he's fighting metaphors

Dead of Night: Devil-Slayer.

Dead of Night: Devil-Slayer.

The reinvented Devil-Slayer takes Marvel's DEAD OF NIGHT to terrifying new heights, from award-winning horror novelist Brian Keene (The Rising, Dark Hollow) and artist Chris Samnee (DAREDEVIL: BLOOD OF THE TARANTULA)! 32 PG. Cardstock Cover/Rated T. .Issue Dead of Night Devil Slayer (2008) Published Dec 2008 by Marvel.

Brian Keene Chris Samnee June Chung Kaare Andrews Vc Joe Caramagna Virtual Calligr. Save Published Format.

Abandoned by his family and his government, Sgt. Dan Sylva returns to Iraq for a third tour of duty-and a descent into Hell itself. Dead of Night Featuring Devil-Slayer 1.

Abandoned by his fiancee, his family, his church, and his government, Sergeant Dan Sylva returns to Iraq for a third tour of duty - and a descent into Hell itself! If the demon Belathauzer and the mysterious mercenary group known as Bloodstone have their way, Iraq, the place where civilization began, may also be where civilization ends! The reinvented Devil-Slayer takes Marvel's Dead of Night to terrifying new heights, from award-winning horror novelist Brian Keene (The Rising, Dark Hollow) and artist Chris Samnee (Daredevil: Blood of the Tarantula)! Collects Dead of Night Featuring Devil-Slayer #1-4.
Ariseym
Interesting reboot of a classic character. Has very little to do with classic Devil Slayer or the Marvel Universe at all. But good quick set up.
Jwalextell
Great
Pemand
Devil-Slayer is an interesting story. It mixes action and horror with a dose of real world politics. It's a mix that works pretty well but does have a few flaws.

On the up side modern Iraq is a really good place for a horror story and military-themed horror is a rare but very interesting side of the genre. Our lead character, Dan Sylva, is an easy guy to relate to. A veteran who got shafted by the economy, he finds himself with no choice but to return to the military and Iraq. It's a good spin and a reasonable way to give the lead the considerable fighting skills he needs to survive what's coming.

Modern Iraq feels like a real place and the complex issues at work there are always in the background keeping what really is a fairly basic "chosen one" story from seeming dull. But standard story or not Keene spins his yarn well. I enjoyed reading about Dan's adventure and by the time it was done I found myself wanting to know what would happen to him next.

On the downside there's a few things that I found confusing. First, it's not made clear if this is set in the normal Marvel Universe. There are nods to characters like Dracula and Damion Hellstrom, but the info we're given on the last Devil Slayer is VERY much at odds with what was presented when the character was last seen back during Secret Invasion. Also, the badguy "military contractors" are called Bloodstone. The Bloodstone name is normally associated with goodguy monster hunters. This is never explained in the slightest.

Also, the ending glosses over a lot of things that really should have been given some room to breath. That made the ending seem rushed which was a shame as the climax is pretty well written.

Overall I found this to be a solid read. If you're in the mood for a good action/horror story Devil-Slayer is worth a try.
Thetalune
I picked this book up knowing nothing about the character and having a slight idea about what the book entailed. Turns out I was wrong about what to expect from the book, but was very pleased with how it turned out.

Devil-Slayer follows a SGT in the US Army as he returns to Iraq for another tour, as part of a QRF for on call missions. His first mission out, he takes his squad to a building to look for a Soldier who is MIA. He finds the Soldier amongst some "bloodstone" operatives and is subsequently thrown in the middle of a much larger war, one between heaven and hell. What follows is some demond and devil slaying amidst an interesting plot.

Very highly recommend this to anyone. The story is masterfully told and the artwork suits it well.
Gralmeena
After a disastrous return home from two tours in Iraq, Sergeant Dan Sylva has re-enlisted for a third tour. His first mission out, the recovery of a fellow soldier as well as “a large number of missing civilians”, doesn’t go as planned. Mainly because what Dan sees upon entering the building isn’t a group of kidnapped civilians being held by a terrorist cell but instead a mess of slaughtered bodies surrounded by a horse of demons.

Dan fights for his life, but is only saved by the intervention of a man who had previous claimed to be a reporter, but is really a magi sent to protect him and tell him about his true purpose. It seems Dan Sylva is more than just a soldier in the US Army, he’s also a shagish chultepi, or “Devil-Slayer.”

There’s a plot at work here that Dan couldn’t have dreamed of on his best day, involving angels and demons working together to bring about an early Armageddon. But after retrieving the Sword of Naram-Sin, Dan is the only human alive with the power to stop the oncoming destruction.

Honestly, I think that all sounds a lot more exciting and interesting than it really was. This book was originally published as a 4-part comic series, part of Marvel’s more adult-oriented MAX line of violent books, in 2008. Written by horror author Brian Keene with art by Chris Samnee, DEAD OF NIGHT: Devil-Slayer is “meh” at best.

The story isn’t that intriguing and once we get to the point of it all--“They use ritual sacrifice to gather energy from human souls… With enough energy, they’ll unleash the forces of Hell. With the planet overrun by demons, Heaven will mistakenly believe that Hell invaded Earth. They’ll retaliate. An orchestrated Armageddon.”--um, no, I don’t think so. It all seems very elaborate and farfetched, don’t you think? And the idea the demons are using Earth’s own wars to hide their atrocities, ok I can buy that part. But the rest of the plan feels like it all hinges on a “Three’s Company” punch line. Jack Tripper’s gonna overhear Chrissy’s date from the kitchen, talking to someone innocently on the phone, and mistake the entire context of the call for something sinister and not very wholesome at all, and he’s going to cause a big misunderstanding when he tries to do the right thing. Come on, now. Heaven is going to mistakenly believe Hell has invaded? Seriously? I’m no theologian, but I’ve read my Bible enough times to know that is possibly never going to ever happen. For one, the angel Gabriel is in league with the demons here, but isn’t the big deal about angels having beef with humans because God gave man free will, something he didn’t give to the angels? So how is Gabriel in league with ANYONE? And that’s just a minor detail in it all, one I could be totally wrong about. But you know what I’m NOT wrong about? The idea that God would look at the demons running rampant on Earth and cry in shock, “They’ve invaded! Arm the angels, we march at dawn!”

I mean, I can’t see the angels declaring war without the say-so from Capital G, so this whole plan succeeds or fails based on God’s pulling a Jack Tripper?

Ok.

But for me, that wasn’t the only con.

Devil-Slayer, at least a different version of him, Dan Sylva’s uncle Eric, has been around since 1977. For this version, however, Keene has created his own take on the character. Dan Sylva knows only that his uncle suffered from PTSD after Vietnam, but nothing about his stint as the Defender known as Devil-Slayer.

While I felt sympathy for Dan at the start--fiancee met someone else while he was away, he can’t find a job after returning to the States--that sympathy quickly turned to eye rolls reading Dan’s inner monologue captions.

“Speechless, I let the M-4 talk for me instead.”

“This guy better have some answers.”

“I hear the wind picking up outside. Storm coming. Suits my mood.”

“[The sword] feels like a part of me. Natural. Like I’ve been using it all my life. Gotta admit, I could get used to this.”

“I should be scared. But I’m not. Only thing I feel is vengeful.”

I could go on, but even just reading these to myself, I can’t do it in anything less than a gravelly voice, and my inner monologue throat is getting sore from these captions.

Do people really think like this to themselves? I mean, outside of badly scripted war movies or westerns? And 80s action films? Dan Sylva, Devil-Slayer, reads more like Dirty Harry meets Mad Max. And it’s boring. Maybe if this book had come out 20 years earlier, sure. But in 2008, I’d like to think we’ve moved beyond this sort of shallow characterization where the hero is this ridiculously overly-macho alpha male lunkhead.

To me, Sylva reads like a man who can’t get out of his own way long enough to look around and realize there are things in this world other than chest-thumping. And I just can’t buy a character like that. Not in 2008, and certainly not at the end of 2015. At 43, that type of character is just too narrowly drawn for me to take any interest in.

As for the art, since this is a comic, Samnee’s work suits the tone of the book very well, but I think June Chung’s color palette works against the art sometimes, especially when everything is tinged in red, making the human characters hard to distinguish from the demons. Samnee’s panel layout moves smoothly, telling the story very easily. Also, his detail in some of the more horrific elements works perfectly, especially when the main demon of the story reveals its true form near the end.

While I enjoyed this book from a visual standpoint, if this had been an ongoing monthly series, and I read these first four issues just to finish off the first arc, I wouldn’t have picked up issue #5. The direction would obviously have been nothing new at all, demon of the week tropes with the occasional soul-searching Sylva issue sprinkled throughout, all of it amounting to nothing because when the going gets tough, Sylva would just revert right back to letting the sword or the M-4 do the talking for him. And honestly, I’d rather just go watch PREDATOR again.

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