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» » Danny Dunn and the Automatic House
Danny Dunn and the Automatic House e-book

Author:

Jay Williams

Language:

English

Category:

Children

Subcategory:

Science Nature & How It Works

ePub size:

1244 kb

Other formats:

lrf doc mobi rtf

Rating:

4.3

Publisher:

Simon Pulse (May 1, 1983)

ISBN:

0671457535

Danny Dunn and the Automatic House e-book

by Jay Williams


Book 9 of 15 in the Danny Dunn Series.

Book 9 of 15 in the Danny Dunn Series. I read all these in elementary school some fifty years ago now and I remember vividly the sense of wonder they inspired. Here was a young kid in early 1960's America puzzling out the ways of cold-war science and technology as it was then emerging, stumbling in adventures and misadventures in which some of the implications of this technology were teased out.

Danny Dunn and the Homework Machine. All books were purchased from a school house that closed doors in the 40's. Danny Dunn and the Universal Glue.

Danny and his friends learn that in addition to the automated locks, everything is only a fake sample and the windows cannot be broken. They are trapped inside with no food or telephone, and the Fair does not open for three days!

Danny and his friends learn that in addition to the automated locks, everything is only a fake sample and the windows cannot be broken. They are trapped inside with no food or telephone, and the Fair does not open for three days! Kids Adventures & Detectives Sci-Fi Young Adult. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Danny and his friends get involved in the world of robots. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone.

This one, Danny Dunn and the Automatic House, is not space-related .

This one, Danny Dunn and the Automatic House, is not space-related, but seems nearly as dated as those of space travel. I had forgotten the simplicity of the robot "Scuttler" and control systems, of push-button control panels that truly had physical buttons to push, and of punch-cards. Jay Williams' novel The Forger examines commercialism and art, and the relation of art to real life. His interest in history is reflected in the non-fiction books he wrote: The Middle Ages, Knights of the Crusades, The Spanish Armada, and Joan of Arc, as well as his young adult Landmark book on World War II, The Battle for the North Atlantic.

Danny Dunn and the Automatic House is the ninth novel in the Danny Dunn series of juvenile science fiction/adventure books written by Raymond Abrashkin and Jay Williams. The book was first published in 1965. Professor Bullfinch develops the "House of the Future" in which all controls are automatic, and plans to debut it at an upcoming Science Fair. This includes temperature controls and other standard functions, but also items such as washing machines, food preparation and normal housework.

Danny Dunn is the name of a fictional character and protagonist of a series of American juvenile science fiction/adventure books. Co-authors Raymond Abrashkin and Jay Williams wrote these books beginning in 1956

Danny Dunn is the name of a fictional character and protagonist of a series of American juvenile science fiction/adventure books. Co-authors Raymond Abrashkin and Jay Williams wrote these books beginning in 1956. These stories by Raymond Abrashkin and Jay Williams were set in the fictional American town of Midston. The plots featured characters who were interested in science and mathematics.

Danny uses a computer that Professor Bulfinch has created for NASA to prepare his homework, despite Professor Bullfinch's warning that Danny is to leave the machine alone

Danny uses a computer that Professor Bulfinch has created for NASA to prepare his homework, despite Professor Bullfinch's warning that Danny is to leave the machine alone. With his friend Joe Pearson and his new neighbor, Irene Miller, Danny has some success with the machine before it is sabotaged. Can Danny figure out what is wrong with the computer and fix it? And will their teacher learn what's really going on with homework?

Danny Dunn and the Homework Machine - is the third novel in the Danny Dunn series of juvenile science fiction/adventure books written by Raymond Abrashkin and Jay Williams. The book was first published in 1958 and originally illustrated by Ezra Jack Keats.

Danny Dunn and the Homework Machine - is the third novel in the Danny Dunn series of juvenile science fiction/adventure books written by Raymond Abrashkin and Jay Williams. Danny Dunn and the Universal Glue - is the fifteenth and final novel in the Danny Dunn series of juvenile science fiction/adventure books written by Raymond Abrashkin and Jay Williams. The book was first published in 1977.

Authors: Jay Williams, Abrashkin Abrashkin . Danny Dunn and the Anti-Gravity Paint Danny Dunn on a Desert Island Danny Dunn and the Homework Machine Danny Dunn and the Weather Machine Danny Dunn on the Ocean Floor Danny Dunn and the Fossil Cave Danny Dunn and the Heat Ray Danny Dunn, Time Traveler Danny Dunn and the Automatic House Danny Dunn and the Voice from Space Danny Dunn and. the Smallifying Machine Danny Dunn and the Swamp Monster Danny Dunn, Invisible Boy Danny Dunn Scientific Detective Danny Dunn and the Universal Glue DEDICATION This book is for the little Foxes-Jane and John.

The story of how robots and automation get involved in the lives of Danny, his friends, and a college professor
Uranneavo
Both social mores and tech in the book are definitely decades old. Fun to reread if it was a childhood favorite, as it was for me (though the series was dated even in the 1970s, for instance when Danny routinely carried his friend Irene’s books home from school. It’s also fun to read just to see how most of the home’s gee-whiz automatic features are either common now or things we don’t have because they’re clearly impractical, for instance how the whole house spins to catch the good sunlight.
monotronik
We loved this book. It was enjoyable to see a 1950s or ‘60s conception of what a futuristic house would be like. My seven-year-old thoroughly enjoyed the book. Some of the inventions of the future are remarkably accurate, while others are quite far off.
Stonewing
Okay. I picked up four Danny Dunn titles from Amazon recently but will review only one. What I say here applies to the entire series of Danny Dunn books. I read all these in elementary school some fifty years ago now and I remember vividly the sense of wonder they inspired. Here was a young kid in early 1960's America puzzling out the ways of cold-war science and technology as it was then emerging, stumbling in adventures and misadventures in which some of the implications of this technology were teased out. Here were adventures involving computerized houses, weather making machines, anti-gravity paint instead of pirates, or werewolves, or mad scientists, super-heroes, or GI Joes (not that I didn't enjoy all those kinds of stories too) and this made things all contemporary and relevant and tangible to me, fueled my interest in science and melded it with my need for adventure and mystery. There was an innocence to Danny's adventures and his science, but reading it now it is uncannily prescient about many of the ways tech has in fact shaped our current culture. There's no hint of the ways in which such science would come to reek of capitalism and entrepreneurial aggrandizement (Silicon Valley and all its Wardens), much like you'd not deduce para-militarism from Boy Scout expeditions and the quest for badges. The virtues of this should stand as a corrective and assist in recovering that sense of science and tech as an idyllic, utopian exploration of the world for solutions to problems and a real grasp of what 'wonder' might look like. Innocence dissembles with time and circumstance, for all of us certainly, but honesty and good faith don't necessarily. The Dunn books stand firmly on this ground and however dated read like a remedy to more overdetermined, heavy handed moral tomes that we'd science to magic and both to power.
Uylo
Great product and transaction
FEISKO
Midston University, as part of a convention, builds (as suggested by Danny Dunn) a dream future house. Danny, Irene, and Joe check out the house before it opens. The gadgets are interesting, though they don't project how much computers would change things for us all - on that level. Some things in the house aren't quite meant to be (as always, the book shows technology's practical limits), and that's how they get in trouble - locked in because the voice-activated door malfunctions. They use a little ingenuity, though...

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