ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » How to Grow When Markets Don't
How to Grow When Markets Don't e-book

Author:

Adrian Slywotzky,Richard Wise,Richard Doyle,Karl Weber

Language:

English

Category:

Business

Subcategory:

Marketing & Sales

ePub size:

1755 kb

Other formats:

txt docx doc mobi

Rating:

4.7

Publisher:

Warner Business; Abridged edition (April 1, 2003)

ISBN:

1586215310

How to Grow When Markets Don't e-book

by Adrian Slywotzky,Richard Wise,Richard Doyle,Karl Weber


I've read three of Adrian Slywotzky's books during the last twelve months and I'm deeply inspired by his bright ideas on the art of profitability. This book focuses on how to profit via growth

I've read three of Adrian Slywotzky's books during the last twelve months and I'm deeply inspired by his bright ideas on the art of profitability. This book focuses on how to profit via growth. The key chapters are those that lay out the concepts behind "hidden assets" (that can be exploited to create value in new markets) and "demand innovation" (how to explore new ways to solve unmet customer needs via external analysis).

Adrian Slywotzky (Author), Richard Wise (Author), Karl Weber (Author), Richard Doyle (Narrator) .

Adrian Slywotzky (Author), Richard Wise (Author), Karl Weber (Author), Richard Doyle (Narrator), Hachette Audio (Publisher) & 2 more. However, its pre-existing relationships and distribution expertise had little to contribute to this new area, and the result was a financial and strategic failure.

Slywotzky wrote several books on profitability and growth, namely the bestselling The Profit Zone. How to Grow When Markets Don't with Richard Wise (2005).

Slywotzky wrote several books on profitability and growth, namely the bestselling The Profit Zone In 2001 he received an honorary professorship from the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

ADRIAN J. SLYWOTZKY - cited by Industry Week as promising "to be what Peter Drucker was to much of the 20th . SLYWOTZKY - cited by Industry Week as promising "to be what Peter Drucker was to much of the 20th century, the management guru against whom all others are measured"-is a director of Oliver Wyman. He is the author of the bestselling The Profit Zone (selected by BusinessWeek as one of the ten best books of 1998), Value Migration, and How to Grow When Markets Don't.

by Richard Wise, Adrian J. Slywotzky, Karl Weber. Slywotzky and co-author Rick Wise concisely frame the growth challenge faced in many industries today, and help the reader in identifying several tangible options for driving revenue and profitability, even in the current market.

Get Your Free Audiobook. How to Grow When Markets Don't. Narrated by: Richard Doyle. By: Adrian Slywotzky, Richard Wise, Karl Weber. Length: 3 hrs and 37 mins. Categories: Business, Leadership & Management. A truly eye-opening business audiobook, How to Grow When Markets Don't shows how old-line companies are creating new profits through "demand innovation. This powerful approach to recognizing the opportunities that surround a product instead of merely improving, asks: Where do customers spend the most time and money in areas related to my product or service?

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Richard Wise's books.

Discover new books on Goodreads. Richard Wise’s Followers. None yet. Richard Wise. Richard Wise’s books. Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This work offers a summary of the book HOW TO GROW WHEN MARKETS DON’T by Adrian Slywotzky & Richard Wise. For many years, the answer for growth creation was thought to be product innovation – a better product.

Slywotzky, Adrian J; Wise, Richard, 1964-; Weber, Karl, 1953 .

Slywotzky, Adrian J; Wise, Richard, 1964-; Weber, Karl, 1953-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. org on December 10, 2010.

By Adrian Slywotzky, Richard Wise and Karl Weber. PART 1: A Different Way to Grow. I. Customers Don’t Care About Our R&D : Air Liquide. A. The Growth Crisis. Air Liquide encounters a problem when customers feel clueless, and neglected with the. company’s cumbersome and centralized hierarchy.

Outlines the challenges faced by most companies to sustain growth, offering advice on how to meet specific customer needs, retain investor loyalty, make effective acquisitions and partnerships, and achieve independence from a CEO.
Akelevar
From 1990 - 2000, just 7% of publicly traded companies in the U.S. enjoyed at least 8 years of double-digit growth. Thus, growth multiples and promotion opportunities are falling. Slywotzky begins by explaining why the usual growth approaches have largely already been mined out.

Business design innovators (eg. Southwest Air, Nucor, Wal-Mart) have taken billions of dollars of shareholder value from leaders such as United Air, U.S. Steel, and Sears. For most, however, this no longer offers the desired growth. Product extensions (eg. Pepsi Blue) produce increasingly small returns in over-crowded markets. Product enhancement is another largely depleted avenue for new profit growth as they increasingly are rare, slender, and fleeting (Nintendo vs. Sony, Intel vs. AMD, Avis vs. Hertz). And because meaningful breakthroughs have become rare, customers are extending product replacement cycles - shrinking sales growth further. In the high-tech industries, the vast majority of companies and initiatives founded on breakthrough technologies fail to get off the ground - NeXT Computer, Wang, Data General, Digital, Palm are examples. International markets increasingly hold declining opportunity for significant new growth - emerging markets are mostly as mature, competitive, and saturated as the U.S., generally plagued by inefficient distribution channels, economic and political instability, and protectionist laws. Worse yet, they're increasingly producing world-class competitors (Samsung, Hyundai). Finally, M&A has already reduced the number of viable acquisition targets.

Cardinal Health found a way past these blocks by providing complete pharmacy management services - including staff and systems, and automated drug administration that also automated portions of ordering and inventory management, as well as hospital billing. Simultaneously it also implemented pre-packed surgery packs, sterilized and tailored to the individual surgeon and operation.

McKesson, a competitor, instead attempted to grow via buying HBOC, a major supplier of enterprise software to hospitals, though the business was already slowing. However, its pre-existing relationships and distribution expertise had little to contribute to this new area, and the result was a financial and strategic failure.

Customer value chain opportunities include follow-on services such as installation, maintenance, financing, training, and outsourced operations. G.E. is a leader in this tactic. Home Depot's providing financing and construction is another example.

Harley-Davidson takes another approach, sponsoring rider rallies, motorcycle magazines, high-margin accessories, as well as financing.

A prerequisite for demand innovation is great performance in the core business.

In most cases outsourcing is a pure cost-saving ploy operating largely as before (with less flexibility) and little profit.
Aiata
I've read three of Adrian Slywotzky's books during the last twelve months and I'm deeply inspired by his bright ideas on the art of profitability. This book focuses on how to profit via growth.

The key chapters are those that lay out the concepts behind "hidden assets" (that can be exploited to create value in new markets) and "demand innovation" (how to explore new ways to solve unmet customer needs via external analysis).

This is the universe of HIDDEN ASSETS that may be leveraged in a growth strategy:
1) Traditional Intellectual assets (intellectual property, competency/skills, and brand).
2) Customer relationships (reach/many, interaction/deep or frequent contact, insight/knowledge, authority/reputation).
3) Strategic real estate (unique value chain position, competitive market position, portal/gateway).
4) Networks (third-party relationships/partners, installed base/post-sale owners, user community, and deal flow/preferential access to potential transactions/M&As).
5) Information (market window/superior insight, technical know-how, software and systems, by-product information).

I found many of the case stories very inspiring, although the well-explained out-of-the-box story of "Cardinal Health" stood out as the most exciting.

The book draws on Slywotzky's previous books. It pursues the eternal theme ... that the path to profitability lies in truly understanding your current and future customers.

Being a business development manager, I search for relevant tools to apply the growth ideas to my own business. The cases in the book are very good and on the website for this book - demandinnovation.com -, you'll find the core ideas in a graphical form as well as an excellent 32-page companion workbook on "Getting Started".

I also highly recommend Slywotzky's "Profit Zone" (1997/2002) and "Art of Profitability" (2002). Note that these books present the same 23 profit models, first as a standard business strategy book, then as an easy-to-read novel.

If you're interested in other strategy books on Growth, let me draw your attention to "Blue Ocean Strategy" by Kim & Mauborgne (2005), "Profitable Growth" by Charan (2004), and "Beyond the Core" by Zook (2004).

Peter Leerskov,
MSc in International Business (Marketing & Management) and Graduate Diploma in E-business

e-Books related to How to Grow When Markets Don't