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» » Mass Destruction: The Men and Giant Mines That Wired America and Scarred the Planet
Mass Destruction: The Men and Giant Mines That Wired America and Scarred the Planet e-book

Author:

Timothy J. LeCain

Language:

English

Category:

Business

Subcategory:

Industries

ePub size:

1832 kb

Other formats:

doc lrf lrf docx

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

Rutgers University Press; None ed. edition (June 22, 2009)

Pages:

280

ISBN:

0813545293

Mass Destruction: The Men and Giant Mines That Wired America and Scarred the Planet e-book

by Timothy J. LeCain


In "Mass Destruction" author Timothy LeCain skillfully delivers a unique, insightful perspective and timely look at the economic wonder that is America - an America whose adolescence at the turn of the 20th century lead to unequaled technology and wealth, too often at the tragic.

In "Mass Destruction" author Timothy LeCain skillfully delivers a unique, insightful perspective and timely look at the economic wonder that is America - an America whose adolescence at the turn of the 20th century lead to unequaled technology and wealth, too often at the tragic expense of many lives lost in the depths of the earth in large scale mines. One of those is Daniel Jackling, the Henry Ford parallel whom history has.

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Mass Destruction book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Mass Destruction book. The place: The steep mountains outside Salt Lake City  . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Mass Destruction: The Men and Giant Mines That Wired America and Scarred the Planet as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Mass Destruction is the compelling story of Daniel Jackling and the development of open-pit hard rock mining, its role in the wiring of an electrified America, and its devastating environmental effects.

Published by: Rutgers University Press. Mass Destruction is the compelling story of Daniel Jackling and the development of open-pit hard rock mining, its role in the wiring of an electrified America, and its devastating environmental effects. This new method of mining, complimenting the mass production and mass consumption that came to define the "American way of life"in the early twentieth century, promised infinite supplies of copper and other natural resources.

September 2010 · The Journal of American History.

Professor Timothy J Lecain. Professor Timothy J Lecain. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Mass Destruction : The Men and Giant Mines That Wired America and Scarred the Planet.

ONE In the Lands of Mass Destruction (page 1). Read. TWO Between the Heavens and the Earth (page 24). THREE The Stack (page 64).

Picturing Medical Progress From Pasteur to Polio: A History of Mass Media Images and Popular Attitudes in America. Maya Creation Myths: Words and Worlds of the Chilam Balam. Rutgers University Press, 2009. Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 2010.

The award-winning book, Mass Destruction: The Men and Giant Mines that Wired America and Scarred the Planet, tells the story of two .

The award-winning book, Mass Destruction: The Men and Giant Mines that Wired America and Scarred the Planet, tells the story of two enormous open pit copper mines, the Berkeley Pit in Butte and the Bingham Pit in Utah. Born and raised in Missoula, LeCain vividly remembers visiting the Berkeley Pit as a young boy.

Mass destruction mining soon spread around the nation and the globe, providing raw materials essential to the mass production and .

Mass destruction mining soon spread around the nation and the globe, providing raw materials essential to the mass production and mass consumption that increasingly defined the emerging "American way of life. But, what were the consequences? Timothy J. LeCain deftly analyzes how open-pit mining continues to affect the environment in its ongoing devastation of nature and commodification of the physical world. The nation's largest toxic Superfund site would be one effect, as well as other types of environmental dead zones around the globe.

The place: The steep mountains outside Salt Lake City. The time: The first decade of the twentieth century. The man: Daniel Jackling, a young metallurgical engineer. The goal: A bold new technology that could provide billions of pounds of cheap copper for a rapidly electrifying America. The result: Bingham's enormous "Glory Hole," the first large-scale open-pit copper mine, an enormous chasm in the earth and one of the largest humanmade artifacts on the planet. Mass Destruction is the compelling story of Jackling and the development of open-pit hard rock mining, its role in the wiring of an electrified America, as well its devastating environmental consequences.

Mass destruction mining soon spread around the nation and the globe, providing raw materials essential to the mass production and mass consumption that increasingly defined the emerging "American way of life." At the dawn of the last century, Jackling's open pit replaced immense but constricted underground mines that probed nearly a mile beneath the earth, to become the ultimate symbol of the modern faith that science and technology could overcome all natural limits. A new culture of mass destruction emerged that promised nearly infinite supplies not only of copper, but also of coal, timber, fish, and other natural resources.

But, what were the consequences? Timothy J. LeCain deftly analyzes how open-pit mining continues to affect the environment in its ongoing devastation of nature and commodification of the physical world. The nation's largest toxic Superfund site would be one effect, as well as other types of environmental dead zones around the globe. Yet today, as the world's population races toward American levels of resource consumption, truly viable alternatives to the technology of mass destruction have not yet emerged.


Agarus
In "Mass Destruction" author Timothy LeCain skillfully delivers a unique, insightful perspective and timely look at the economic wonder that is America - an America whose adolescence at the turn of the 20th century lead to unequaled technology and wealth, too often at the tragic expense of many lives lost in the depths of the earth in large scale mines. LeCain illuminates this fascinating view into early industrial America - and particularly the American West - through numerous compelling real-life characters. One of those is Daniel Jackling, the Henry Ford parallel whom history has largely forgotten. Entrepreneurial to the extreme, Jackling foresaw something no other industrialist of his time could - the "need for speed" in providing the one material modern industrial society could not survive without, copper. Jackling advanced the mass destruction methods that lead to huge open pit mines, enormous belching smelters, "dead zones" of environmental destruction, and ultimately the means of acquiring the raw materials America needed in its quenchless thirst for growth and progress.

Not just a past history, this important and timely work gets to the very core of our place in nature, the economy, and civilization itself.

Painstakingly researched and brilliantly told, this story of blind faith in technology, the men who preached it, and the consequences to humankind, will leave you with a new appreciation for the shiny red metal we call copper - and for the sacrifices made by the people who provided it in places like Butte, Montana and Bingham, Utah. Rather than a lament over another environmental disaster, LeCain digs deeper, finding insights into the very idea of progress, faith in technologic solutions to environmental problems, and the consequences of the culture of mass destruction. Every American should read this book.
Meri
Great book. I bought it for an environmental studies class and it ended up being a great reference for papers and discussions. I couldn't sell it just in case I need to lend it to someone or feel the need to give it a reread.
Anarasida
This is a fascinating book about not only mining but history. A must read for anyone remotlely interested in history and the envirnoment.
Ferne
Well researched but not high drama. I don't know what i expected but I was not overwhelmed with the content.
Gabar
Nowadays, as a professor of mine expressed two semesters ago, we don't read Edward Gibbon to learn about the Roman Empire. Rather, we read his The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire to gain insight into the period in which Gibbon practiced history, the late eighteenth century. Historians are products of their society, and thus their own writings tell not just of their chosen historical period but of the author's own time. Likewise, we can read Mass Destruction: The Men and Giant Mines that Wired America and Scarred the Planet not simply as a story of the mass destruction method of copper mining, the development of technologies, the lives of players big and small, and the conflicts between miner/smelter and farmer, but of Lecain's own excursion into fatherhood. Sift through Mass Destruction and one finds several references to children, from a wheelbarrow of sand "that is too fine even to be used in a children's sandbox" (160) to "ore-trains, like children's toys seen from afar" (199). At one point, LeCain references his partner role, for "if electricity gave birth to the modern age, then copper was its midwife - or at least a very supportive birthing coach" (28). Whether noting LeCain's references to children in making comparisons has any value, it shows how an author is embedded within his or her own text.

This work combines the history of technology, history of advertising and consumerism, history of industry, history of war, environmental history, and a lesson in chemistry to make sense of copper mining and smelting in American history, in Utah and Montana. Mass Destruction is clearly intended for a broad audience: academics and the general public alike will find value in its pages. For the general reader, the book consists of wonderful descriptions of places and processes, interjected with anecdotal historical tidbits. Further, LeCain, as a historian with a conscience, surely wants the reader to come away from reading Mass Destruction conscious of the environmental effects of the processes that produced their objects of consumption. Vacuum cleaners, cars, and homes are all essentially products of nature. Novel in LeCain's approach to the topic, then, is his breakdown of the technology/nature dichotomy. Analyzing the subterrestrial mines, terrestrial pits, and towering, Isengard-like smelter stacks of various mining operations in envirotechnical terms, LeCain argues that there is no distinct line between what is and what is not manmade. LeCain offers, as part of this envirotechnical system, a pedagogical challenge: "might an outdoor science school offer [LeCain is at MSU-Bozeman; Bozeman is home to the Montana Outdoor Science School], in addition to discussions of the hunting habits of the great horned owl and the role of fire in serotinous pine tree propagation, lessons on the complex natural and social history of the trucks and SUVs that likely brought many of the students and teachers to the camp?" (11). Might LeCain be concerned for the educational future of his own children? Not least the extent of the natural world within the technological world in which they will likely live? I see in Mass Destruction a historian's commentary on not only the past but the world in which we all are headed.

Also interesting in Mass Destruction is the notion of verticality: that mining engineers and geologists created new ways of seeing underground space, whether in seeking the location of veins of copper or working to solve the problem of ventilation and heat. This joint endeavour to understand space that cannot at first be seen led to Anaconda's combining their geological and mining engineering departments. While engineers sought profit, and the geologist knowledge of subterranean spaces, they both benefited from each other.

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