ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » Estimates of Productivity Change by Industry: An Evaluation and an Alternative
Estimates of Productivity Change by Industry: An Evaluation and an Alternative e-book

Author:

Edward F. Denison

Language:

English

Category:

Business

Subcategory:

Economics

ePub size:

1516 kb

Other formats:

mobi txt mbr lit

Rating:

4.7

Publisher:

Brookings Institution Press (March 1, 1989)

Pages:

91

ISBN:

0815718004

Estimates of Productivity Change by Industry: An Evaluation and an Alternative e-book

by Edward F. Denison


Home Browse Books Book details, Estimates of Productivity Change by Industry: A. .Government figures show that from 1948 to 1973 productivity increased at the same rate in the manufacturing and nonmanufacturing portions of American business.

Home Browse Books Book details, Estimates of Productivity Change by Industry: A.Estimates of Productivity Change by Industry: An Evaluation and an Alternative. By Edward F. Denison. The same government figures indicate a dramatic shift in the 1980s, when productivity increased far more in manufacturing industries than in nonmanufacturing. Denison's analysis challenges the reality of this reported change.

Estimates of productivity change by industry. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Estimates of Productivity Change by Industry: An Evaluation and Alternative. March 1990 · The Economic Journal. According to characteristics of tea industry information service, this paper have built service quality evaluation index system for tea industry information service quality, R-cluster analysis and multiple regression have been comprehensively used to contribute evaluation model with a high practice and credibility. Proved by the experiment, the evaluation model of information service quality has.

Denison, Edward A. (1989). Estimates of Productivity Change by Industry: An Evaluation and Alternative. Assessing the Productivity of Information Technology Equipment in . Manufacturing Industries. Brookings Institution. Exact and Superlative Index Numbers. Journal of Econometrics, May/June, 4, 116–145.

Government figures show that from 1948 to 1973 productivity increased at.of Productivity Change by Industry : An Evaluation and an Alternative.

book by Edward Fulton Denison. Estimates of Productivity Change by Industry : An Evaluation and an Alternative. by Edward Fulton Denison. 1. 0 (7 used & new offers).

by Edward F. 9 (11 used & new offers). 2. 0 (10 used & new offers). Denison and J. Estimates of Productivity Change by Industry. Explanations of declining productivity growth (Brookings general series reprint).

Edward Fulton Denison (December 18, 1915, Omaha – October 23, 1992, Washington . was an American economist. Denison earned a bachelor's degree in economics in Oberlin College in 1936, a master's degree in Brown University in 1938, and a doctorate from Brown in 1941.

We propose an alternative measure of productivity growth rate, the chain . weighted by their relative productivity levels

We propose an alternative measure of productivity growth rate, the chain index productivity growth rates, which better approximates the ideal index. Estimates from a companion paper indicate that the Baumol effect for the United States in the period 1977-2000 was actually slightly positive rather than negative as generally supposed. weighted by their relative productivity levels.

For example, a comparison of productivity between two firms in an industry, between two industries within or between countries, or between countries.

Productivity Measurement: Alternative Approaches and Estimates (WP 03/12). Productivity Measurement: Alternative Approaches and Estimates (WP 03/12). Issue date: Sunday, 1 June 2003. For example, a comparison of productivity between two firms in an industry, between two industries within or between countries, or between countries. Section . discusses issues associated with the measurement of the labour input. Consequently some authors prefer to define the resulting productivity measure as multifactor productivity (MFP) due to it including multiple inputs but not all possible (ie, total) inputs.

Government figures show that from 1948 to 1973 productivity increased at the same rate in the manufacturing and nonmanufacturing portions of American business. The same government figures indicate a dramatic shift in the 1980s, when productivity increased far more in manufacturing industries than in nonmanufacturing. Denison's analysis challenges the reality of this reported change. Denison focuses on the meaning and reliability of productivity series for industries within the business economy. His analysis divides into three parts. First, he finds that a large part of the difference between manufacturing and nonmanufacturing growth rates of output per hour stems from the computer industry. He argues that the effect of recent rapid productivity growth in computer production is greatly overstated because the weighting system used to combine products in output measurement exaggerates the importance of computers. Use of an output measure that does not deduct depreciation has the same effect. Denison also questions the way that output of computers is measured. Denison next examines the way changes in output per hour are allocated among industries. His evaluation leads to two major conclusions. One is that the information underlying the estimates is insufficient to warrant confidence in indicated differences among industries. The other is that, quite apart from the computer, the estimated increase in output per hour in the U.S. manufacturing in recent years is almost surely overstated and the increase in nonmanufacturing is correspondingly understated. The size of bias has, in all likelihood, increased over time. Denison recommends that the government introduce an alternative way of dividing the economy for productivity measurement, one that measures productivity in the production of different types of final goods instead of by industry. He describes a methodology that could provide such estimates. The results, Denison contends, are more enlightening and the problems encountered in estimating productivity by industry can be avoided.


e-Books related to Estimates of Productivity Change by Industry: An Evaluation and an Alternative