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» » Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence, and the Poverty of Nations
Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence, and the Poverty of Nations e-book

Author:

Ray Fisman,Edward Miguel

Language:

English

Category:

Business

Subcategory:

Business Culture

ePub size:

1458 kb

Other formats:

rtf docx txt doc

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

Princeton University Press; Revised ed. edition (January 24, 2010)

Pages:

256

ISBN:

0691144699

Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence, and the Poverty of Nations e-book

by Ray Fisman,Edward Miguel


In their new book Economic Gangsters, authors Raymond Fisman and Edward Miguel try to understand what motivates people to break the law, the consequences of their actions and the implications for prevention.

In their new book Economic Gangsters, authors Raymond Fisman and Edward Miguel try to understand what motivates people to break the law, the consequences of their actions and the implications for prevention. Their effort stands out among many others for their cool-headed application of economic cost-benefit analysis to this shady human behavior.

Raymond Fisman and Edward Miguel’s new book Economic Gangsters explores some of the developing world’s most persistent problems. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text.

Электронная книга "Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence, and the Poverty of Nations", Ray Fisman, Edward Miguel. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence, and the Poverty of Nations" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Fisman, Raymond; Miguel, Edward. Fighting for economic development - Suharto, Inc. - The smuggling gap - Nature or nurture? understanding the culture of corruption - No water, no peace - Death by a thousand small cuts - The road back from war - Learning to fight economic gangsters - Epilogue : doing better this time.

by Raymond Fisman & Edward Miguel

by Raymond Fisman & Edward Miguel. Just as there is no loss of basic energy in the universe, so no thought or action is without its effects, present or ultimate, seen or unseen, felt or unfelt No doubt tº is us -y, Ar-Rahiq Al-Makhtoom (The Sealed Nectar) is a book of great value and praiseworthy work on the . .Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture.

Miguel and Raymond Fisman published a study in 2006 which compared the number of parking violations per . In 2008 Miguel and Fisman co-authored the book, Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence and the Poverty of Nations.

Miguel and Raymond Fisman published a study in 2006 which compared the number of parking violations per UN diplomat in New York to Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index. The results found a strong correlation between political corruption and parking tickets, highlighting the role of cultural norms and legal enforcement in corruption.

Meet the economic gangster. Economic Gangsters : Corruption, Violence, and the Poverty of Nations. by Ray Fisman and Edward Miguel.

Fisman and Miguel examine the dark side of economic globalization and the negative impact that it has on many development countries. You are in the United States store.

Fighting for economic development Suharto, Inc. The smuggling gap Nature or nurture? understanding the culture of corruption No water, no peace . Download book Economic gangsters : corruption, violence, and the poverty of nations, Raymond Fisman and Edward Miguel. The smuggling gap Nature or nurture? understanding the culture of corruption No water, no peace Death by a thousand small cuts The road back from war Learning to fight economic gangsters Epilogue : doing better this time. Personal Name: Miguel, Edward. Rubrics: Corruption Economic aspects Political corruption Smuggling.

Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence, and the Poverty of Nations. Raymond Fisman, Edward Miguel. Скачать (pdf, . 8 Mb).

Meet the economic gangster. He's the United Nations diplomat who double-parks his Mercedes on New York City streets at rush hour because the cops can't touch him--he has diplomatic immunity. He's the Chinese smuggler who dodges tariffs by magically transforming frozen chickens into frozen turkeys. The dictator, the warlord, the unscrupulous bureaucrat who bilks the developing world of billions in aid. The calculating crook who views stealing and murder as just another part of his business strategy. And, in the wrong set of circumstances, he might just be you.

In Economic Gangsters, Raymond Fisman and Edward Miguel take readers into the secretive, chaotic, and brutal worlds inhabited by these lawless and violent thugs. Join these two sleuthing economists as they follow the foreign aid money trail into the grasping hands of corrupt governments and shady underworld characters. Spend time with ingenious black marketeers as they game the international system. Follow the steep rise and fall of stock prices of companies with unseemly connections to Indonesia's former dictator. See for yourself what rainfall has to do with witch killings in Tanzania--and more.

Fisman and Miguel use economics to get inside the heads of these "gangsters," and propose solutions that can make a difference to the world's poor--including cash infusions to defuse violence in times of drought, and steering the World Bank away from aid programs most susceptible to corruption.

In a new postscript, the authors look at how economists might use new tools to better understand, and fight back against, corruption and violence in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. Take an entertaining walk on the dark side of global economic development with Economic Gangsters.


Eseve
Eight years ago, as I crossed the Uganda-Kenya border, I was sequestered in a shack, interrogated, threatened with prison, and ultimately required to pay a bribe by border guards. After that harrowing experience, I returned to my hotel and recounted the story to the first friendly face I saw: my sympathetic colleague Ted Miguel. Ted and his colleague Ray spent the succeeding years studying violence and corruption in poor countries; and this sweet book is the latest fruit of those labors.

What can economics tell us about corruption and violence around the world? More, perhaps, than you'd expect. Ray and Ted use surprise changes in a dictator's health to measure the value of political connections in Indonesia, rainfall to capture the effect of recessions on violence in Africa, and tricks in the trade data to reveal smuggling. (That's not to mention the parking tickets - Chapter Four.) They present their clever research in surprisingly clear English, and they draw on the related research of other economists as well. They really know how to tell a story: I was captivated by the opening recounting of Kenyan author Ngugi's woes and delighted by the creative policy making of Antanas Mockus, mayor of Bogota.

It's hard not to compare popular economics books today to Freakonomics: Gangsters has the advantages of Ted and Ray's witty, pleasant voice, more of a thematic focus, and none of the self-adulation that took away some Freakonomics' shine.

Despite the focus on corruption and violence, ultimately the book is presenting a miscellany of work that is related but isn't (and perhaps cannot be) circumscribed into a larger theory. Occasionally I found myself wishing a central theory like you find in Malcolm Gladwell's books. But then again, those theories usually aren't convincing for exactly the reason that Ted and Ray don't have one: they are careful and big, broad theories are not. I really enjoyed the clear policy recommendation of Rapid Conflict Prevention Support in Chapter 6, and I look forward to more clear recommendations in the next book. Again, Ted and Ray are careful and tend not to recommend policies that don't have clear evidence to stand on. Not all scholars are comfortable laying out strong recommendations on limited evidence; two books by scholars who are more comfortable are The Bottom Billion and The End of Poverty. (As I recall, that's also the self-definition given by an economic hit man!) The main policy recommendation, ultimately, is more evidence-based policy making, particularly randomized trials of development programs (but with a healthy view of the realistic scope for these kinds of trials).

This book won't just show you that economists can be clever (although it will show you that): It shows that economics, cleverly applied, can illuminate some of the most intractable development problems of our time. I strongly recommend it. And if you don't trust me, Publishers Weekly said that in this "surprisingly spry" read, "fascinating insights abound" [1]. Take it from both of us and learn something.

[1] Publishers Weekly, 6 October 2008.
Zyniam
This book is a useful addition to other books examining the development question. In addition to takes head on the issues of corruption and violence which can lay waste to the best laid plans. The correlation between the weather and violence is interesting but when seen against the more harsher climes of the north shouldn't the African be able to adapt and thrive? With corruption isn't it that our elite have little to no experience in wealth creation and therefore see corruption as means to an end beyond just greed?
The search continues. But I am more than glad to have happened on this offering.
spacebreeze
These two authors have come together to provide the reader with a nuanced and complicated view of development. Mainly, because development is complicated. They provide specific stories, research, and ideas about how some problems can be solved. They start us on the path of finding a broader theory by figuring out piece by piece what works. Insightful, though provoking, and incomplete; which is exactly as it was designed.
Геракл
This book should get an award for the most misleading title of the year. It is a beach ball approach to global corruption and should be read with milk and cookies on the side of the pool. Chapter 2 "SUHARTO" (one of the most corrupt regimes and war criminals of the 20th century, mind you); is completely negligent on the points of authentic history. The attitude presented can be summed up by a two line quote from page 39. "Corruption in Suharto's Indonesia wasn't some petty shakedown by underpaid policemen or labor inspectors trying to make ends meet. It was big business." If you are doing serious research, that is the type of insight you can expect from the entire book. If you are looking for true leads in the world of black market politics and dirty money pools; don't waste your time here. The only thing more misleading than the title are the 'pre-release' editorial reviews loaded with praises that are carefully crafted to sell a book that fails to rise to any level of competency.
Puchock
OK but not great,
Gavidor
Book is awesome. It's scary to read and apply this information to today's world this book has opened my eyes
Samowar
Great.
Great Book. Highly recommended.

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