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» » In The Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives
In The Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives e-book

Author:

L.J. Ganser,Steven Levy

Language:

English

Category:

Business

Subcategory:

Biography & History

ePub size:

1981 kb

Other formats:

docx txt lit mobi

Rating:

4.7

Publisher:

Brilliance Audio; Library edition (May 17, 2011)

ISBN:

1455807931

In The Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives e-book

by L.J. Ganser,Steven Levy


No other book has ever turned Google inside out as Levy does with In the Plex.

They followed this brilliant innovation with another, as two of Google’s earliest employees found a way to do what no one else had: make billions of dollars from Internet advertising. No other book has ever turned Google inside out as Levy does with In the Plex.

That was before one pioneering work documented the underground computer revolution that was about to change our . ways similar to the way Google works its AdWords program. In China was to report as much In The Plex. Load more similar PDF files.

That was before one pioneering work documented the underground computer revolution that was about to change our world f. Artificial Life: A Report from the Frontier Where Computers Meet Biology. This enthralling book alerts us to nothing less than the existence of new varieties of life. Some of these species can move and eat, see, reproduce, and die. Some behave like birds or ants.

He has also written about Apple (Insanely Great and The Perfect Thing) and is the author of the classic book Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution. This issue of privacy, highlighted in the middle of the book, returns with a fury towards the conclusion when Levy examines Google’s involvement with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Электронная книга "In The Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives", Steven Levy. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "In The Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Levy traces how Google’s intricately developed, intrepid beginnings and gradual ascent over a competitive marketplace . Outstanding reportage delivered in the upbeat, informative fashion for which Levy is well known.

Levy traces how Google’s intricately developed, intrepid beginnings and gradual ascent over a competitive marketplace birthed an advertising-fueled ’money machine’ (especially following its IPO in 2004), and he follows the expansion and operation of the company’s liberal work campus (’Googleplex’) and its distinctively selective hiring process (Page still signs off on every new hire). To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

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Few companies in history have ever been as successful and as admired as Google, the company that has transformed the Internet and become an indispensable part of our lives. How has Google done it? Veteran technology reporter Steven Levy was granted unprecedented access to the company, and in this revelatory book he takes readers inside Google headquarters ― the Googleplex ― to show how Google works. While they were still students at Stanford, Google cofounders Larry Page and Sergey Brin revolutionized Internet search. They followed this brilliant innovation with another, as two of Google’s earliest employees found a way to do what no one else had: make billions of dollars from Internet advertising. With this cash cow (until Google’s IPO nobody other than Google management had any idea how lucrative the company’s ad business was), Google was able to expand dramatically and take on other transformative projects: more efficient data centers, open-source cell phones, free Internet video (YouTube), cloud computing, digitizing books, and much more. The key to Google’s success in all these businesses, Levy reveals, is its engineering mind-set and adoption of such Internet values as speed, openness, experimentation, and risk taking. After its unapologetically elitist approach to hiring, Google pampers its engineers ― free food and dry cleaning, on-site doctors and masseuses ― and gives them all the resources they need to succeed. Even today, with a workforce of more than 23,000, Larry Page signs off on every hire. But has Google lost its innovative edge? It stumbled badly in China―Levy discloses what went wrong and how Brin disagreed with his peers on the China strategy―and now with its newest initiative, social networking, Google is chasing a successful competitor for the first time. Some employees are leaving the company for smaller, nimbler start-ups. Can the company that famously decided not to be evil still compete? No other book has ever turned Google inside out as Levy does with In the Plex.
Gamba
I went into this book thinking I was going to obtain insight into how the Google founders think and how Google approaches business. I was worried that the author, apparently given inside access and being one who writes professionally depending on this kind of access, would have a compromised objectivity by painting only a rosy picture. Then as I read on, it felt at times like I was reading an advertisement for why one should work at Google and something written to avoid offending the corporate Google and its employees.

Even Google mistakes are cast in a positive upbeat light. No real discussion of blunders like the Logitech Google relation with Google TV.

Wasn't explicitly looking for the bad....but just looking for something truthful and insightful. Google and its founders success are obvious. They've done great things and the founders and employees have done excellent ground breaking work. And the book is written well in the sense that it's easy to read and conveys information in the form of stories versus more dry treatments. However, it reads only like something a fan would write about their idol...and there are discrete instances where I even cringed at how much of a fanboy book this was.

It's unfortunate but a reality that it's hard to obtain inside access to companies in order to write about them and then not write anything but a glowing story. Otherwise...no one else will let you in. Not to mention that it's written about contemporary living powerful people and a corporation...so it would be intimidating to write anything more blunt. It's no wonder that you see books on the likes of Ford and Edison long after their time that are more of an exposure of reality....and we will probably have to wait 50-100 years to hear what really makes Google tick, how the founders think, and how the company works. Which is a shame because it could be helpful to entrepreneurs who really would like to learn from such folks and not just be fed fluff. The real deal, warts and all, the good and bad, will have to wait.
Still In Mind
This book describes the initial growth of Google, and does a good job of describing how the Google culture (kind of like Intel's chip production allocation culture) generally tries to be a data-driven culture that operates by collecting lots of data (eg user queries) and then analyzing the data to determine how to proceed. In this way, the culture de-emphasizes individual human opinions in favor of aggregate statistical results, where they are available.

But I have mixed feelings about the book. Much of it reads like so many of the other gooey, sugary fan books of various Silicon Valley companies where stereotypes are emphasized because it makes a "better" story because of the images that are invoked. (eg. It's cool to do all the anti-traditional (dare I say almost juvenile?) things (like scavenger hunts, etc) normally associated with tech start-ups and their people). It seems to me that ever since the late 1970s too many tech-company books have spread the "it's cool to do X" gooey company philosophies around, and this book seems to be no different.

I think the strength of the book is the discussion of how search grew up, and the descriptions of the technical / algorithmic solutions and infrastructures that were required to implement the Google that we know today. I found the main weakness of the book to be all the tedious descriptions of how wonderful the corporate anti-traditional culture was, and how special it was (really, how could it be, after 30+ years of engineer - driven tech companies before Google?).

I would recommend this book to people who are interested in a layman's-level description of how search grew up, the issues that arose, and the technical / infrastructure solutions that were developed. The scale and technical sophistication of the Google infrastructure (like Amazon and it's AWS infrastructure) just boggles the technical mind, and it is quite interesting to read about it. But I really think the gooey cult stuff was overdone in the book.
Bu
Subtitled _How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives_ this is basically the biography of a company. Right from Google's creation and through to the failure of Buzz with all the highs and lows in between.

Since Google is a company of the internet age there were areas where I skimmed, thinking that I knew all about this. More interesting to me was the behind the scenes information. It was interesting to see how the the viewpoints of senior Googlers differed from the common interpretation of their actions.

The section on China was particularly revealing with lots of description of the friction and disagreements within Google itself about whether to engage with China and when to pull out.

Another bit of particular interest to me was comparing the struggle that Google had once it became an established tech giant and the struggles the Obama administration had.

In both cases idealism and a certain naivety came into hard conflict with entrenched interests. And both groups discovered that while the facts are indeed the facts. The facts won't stop people from misinterpreting everything you do and seeing the worst in you.

I've always had a soft spot for Google and tend to think that at lot of the criticisms levied against them are rather ignorant or fail to recognize the realities of the world. This book reinforced that belief.

It is a bit of a dry read. Perhaps because the people are secondary to the company in the story of Google. It took me a while to read because I found it easier to dip in and out than to read whole chapters at a time. But it is fact with insight.

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