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» » How the Bible Works: An Anthropological Study of Evangelical Biblicism (Cognitive Science of Religion)
How the Bible Works: An Anthropological Study of Evangelical Biblicism (Cognitive Science of Religion) e-book

Author:

Brian Malley

Language:

English

Category:

Bibles

Subcategory:

Bible Study & Reference

ePub size:

1549 kb

Other formats:

lit doc docx azw

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

AltaMira Press (April 30, 2004)

Pages:

184

ISBN:

0759106657

How the Bible Works: An Anthropological Study of Evangelical Biblicism (Cognitive Science of Religion) e-book

by Brian Malley


by examining how a particular set of scrip- tures, the Bible, is perceived and used by a group of American evangelical Christians. He is concerned in particular with the cognitive and social processes that make of the Bible a living and active force in these Christians’ lives.

by examining how a particular set of scrip- tures, the Bible, is perceived and used by a group of American evangelical Christians. He is concerned in particular with the cognitive and social processes that make of the Bible a living and active force in these Christians’ lives

To understand this phenomenon of evangelical Biblicism, anthropologist and biblical scholar Brian Malley looks not to the words of the Bible but to the . Brian Malley studied comparative religion at Western Michigan University (.

To understand this phenomenon of evangelical Biblicism, anthropologist and biblical scholar Brian Malley looks not to the words of the Bible but to the Bible-believing communities. For as Malley demonstrates, it is less the meaning of the words of the Bible itself than how 'the Bible' provides a proper ground for beliefs that matters to evangelicals. 1994) and anthropology at the University of Michigan (P. He currently lectures in psychology at the University of Michigan. His main interests are religion and the intersection of culture and cognition.

Cognitive science of religion series Creekside Baptist Church What is "the Bible"? Interpretation and tradition Biblical authority The structure of biblicism.

Cognitive science of religion series. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-165) and index. Formatted Contents Note: Creekside Baptist Church What is "the Bible"? Interpretation and tradition Biblical authority The structure of biblicism. Uniform Title: Bible Evidences, authority, etc. Rubrics: Evangelicalism United States Psychology.

How the Bible Works book. Start by marking How the Bible Works: An Anthropological Study of Evangelical Biblicism as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. How the Bible Works: An Anthropological Study of Evangelical Biblicism.

Brian Malley studied comparative religion at Western Michigan University (. Speaks of evangelicals as objects of historical curiosity. Dismisses, it seemed to me, the important question of whether or not the Bible actually can carry divine authority

Brian Malley studied comparative religion at Western Michigan University (. Series: Cognitive Science of Religion. Paperback: 184 pages. Dismisses, it seemed to me, the important question of whether or not the Bible actually can carry divine authority. The thing I liked the most was his careful rhetorical analysis of a portion of a real-live sermon.

Although a cognitive science of religion was rst proposed in 1980 (Guthrie), it was not until the following decade that systematically . Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press. Martin, Luther H. (2003).

Although a cognitive science of religion was rst proposed in 1980 (Guthrie), it was not until the following decade that systematically cognitive theories of religion began to be proposed. These theories focused largely on religious rit-ual (Lawson-McCauley 1990), religious ideas (Guthrie 1993; Boyer 1994), religious persistence (Whitehouse 1995; 2000), and the relation-ship of these practices and ideas to evolutionary theory (Mithen 1996). Guthrie, Stewart (1980). A cognitive theory of religion.

In How the Bible Works, a volume in the Altamira Cognitive Science of. Religion series, Brian Malley takes . Religion series, Brian Malley takes up Smith’s challenge to seek a deeper un-. derstanding of scripture in general by examining how a particular set of scrip . A basic anthropological fact is that, although hunger is a constant experience in human history, not everything that from a biochemical point of view could be nutritious, in fact is eaten.

My principle contribution to the Cognitive Science of Religion has been an ethnography of an interpretive tradition, How the Bible Works, in which I developed a cognitively informed model of evangelical Christians' use of the Bible. As extraordinary and fascinating as the Biblicist tradition is, I have always wanted to explore interpretive traditions more broadly, in terms of cognitive theory. So I am seizing my chance. I grew up in a fundamentalist Christian environment. To understand this phenomenon of evangelical Biblicism, anthropologist and biblical scholar Brian Malley looks not to the words of the Bible but to the Bible-believing communities

Brian Malley studied comparative religion at Western Michigan University (. To understand this phenomenon of evangelical Biblicism, anthropologist and biblical scholar Brian Malley looks not to the words of the Bible but to the Bible-believing communities.

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Akir
Did his homework as a churchgoer and scholar. Writes in a stylistically formalized way. Speaks of evangelicals as objects of historical curiosity. Dismisses, it seemed to me, the important question of whether or not the Bible actually can carry divine authority.

The thing I liked the most was his careful rhetorical analysis of a portion of a real-live sermon. He showed how the Bible is used, well in this case I think, to demonstrate contemporary relevance for Americans.
Qutalan
This book really made me think through how the Bible functions in churches and my own experience is that the church studied by the author is typical of Protestant churches in general. One point that I found interesting to ponder is 'what does it mean when we say that the Bible teaches such and such' - what does the word 'Bible' refer to? It clearly doesn't refer to the original texts nor does it refer to any specific physical instance of a Bible or to any particular version so what does it refer to? It isn't an easy question to answer. Interviiewees recognized that there were differences in literalness between different version yet still considered all of them to be Bibles. It isn't something you think about until someone draws it to your attention but once you start thinking about it, it does indeed seem an enigma. And I think that is one of the strengths of this study: to make the familiar seem unfamiliar so that you can look at it with new eyes and perhaps realize that you don't fully understand what you had previously taken for granted.
Coron
I read this book for Dr. Malley's Introduction to Anthropology course at the University of Michigan, and I was impressed. His knowledge of how the Bible is seen by churchgoers is second to none, and throughout the book the reader comes to "know" the people a the Creekside Baptist Church, though that name is a pseudonym. I wouldn't recommend this book for coffee-table reading, as there are lots of technical details; it is better suited for a reader in the academic field.

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